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ARCHIVED - Part III - Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

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2012–13 Estimates

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Message From the Minister

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P. Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

On July 15, 2013 I was proud to be named Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness by Prime Minister Stephen Harper.  Ensuring our border is safe and effective is important to our Government.  I am pleased to present the CBSA’s 2012–13 Departmental Performance Report.

As a Government, we are committed to implementing policies that keep our borders open to legitimate travel and trade, but closed to criminals, terrorists and human smugglers.  And we can see that our policies are working.  Last year, the CBSA processed more than 100 million law-abiding travellers , seized over $300 million in illegal drugs, and removed over 18, 000 illegal immigrants, including nearly 2,000 serious criminals.

The CBSA is also responsible for significant portions of the Beyond the Border Action Plan.  This past year saw the implementation of many initiatives that will keep Canada safe and prosperous.

Amongst the many successes of the past year, Canadians had a sobering reminder of the risks faced every day by our frontline officers when, for the first time in Canadian history, a border services officer was shot in the line of duty. Thankfully, the officer is well on her way to recovery. This incident showed the strength and character of our frontline personnel, while highlighting the importance of our Government’s policy of arming border services officers.

I am proud of the work done by CBSA officers to keep Canadians safe, and I look forward to another successful year.

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness


Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d'être

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the free flow of people and goods, including food, plants, animals and related products across the border.

Responsibilities

Created in 2003, the CBSA is an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which is responsible for integrated national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border management operations. Specific responsibilities include the following:

  • Administering legislation that governs legitimate trade and travel;
  • Detaining people who may pose a threat to Canada;
  • Identifying and removing people who are inadmissible to Canada, including those involved in terrorism, organized crime, war crimes or crimes against humanity;
  • Interdicting illegal goods entering or leaving Canada;
  • Protecting food safety, plant and animal health, and Canada's resource base;
  • Promoting Canadian economic benefits by administering trade legislation and agreements, including the enforcement of trade remedies that protect Canadian industry from the injurious effects of dumped and subsidized imported goods;
  • Administering a fair and impartial redress mechanism; and
  • Collecting applicable duties and taxes on imported goods.

Examples of Acts Administered by the CBSA

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canada Border Services Agency Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Customs Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Food and Drugs Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Special Import Measures Act

CBSA Service Locations

The CBSA provides services at multiple points across Canada and abroad, including the following:

  • 117 land border crossings
  • 27 rail offices
  • 224 airports
  • 439 marine reporting sites
  • 12 ferry terminals
  • 10 cruise ship operations
  • 3 mail processing centres
  • 48 international offices
  • 73 sufferance warehouses
  • 218 commercial vessel clearance facilities

 


Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture

CBSA's strategic outcome and Program Activity Architecture for 2011–12
High resolution (jpg, 115 KB)

Organizational Priorities

Summary of Progress Against Priorities

Priority

  • Modernize the Agency's business processes.

Type

  • New

Program Activities

  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination
  • Criminal Investigations
  • Immigration Enforcement
  • Recourse
  • Revenue and Trade Management

Summary of Progress

In 2012–13, the Agency made significant progress in modernizing its business processes. The CBSA advanced its major transformation projects including: expanding the use of self-service kiosks at airports, advancing the electronic reporting of trade data (eManifest) as well as the assessment and collection of revenue (CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management Initiative). It worked in collaboration with the Canada Post Corporation (CPC) to improve the processing of postal imports. The Agency enhanced the Recourse Program monitoring process through implementing a new quality assurance methodology and by conducting a quality assurance review of the Enhanced Complaints Mechanism responses. It also advanced the arming and training of frontline officers and inaugurated its new state-of-the-art facilities in Rigaud, Quebec.

In 2012–13, the Agency continued to work with partners to improve the integrity of Canada's immigration and refugee programs through undertaking sustainable policy and program work to support the implementation of the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act, Balanced Refugee Reform Act, and the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act. It also implemented the Assisted Voluntary Returns and Reintegration pilot program that has increased voluntary compliance for removals. Additionally, the CBSA continued to improve the timeliness of removals for failed refugee claimants, removing over 8,000 additional failed refugee claimants during 2012–13 as part of its Refugee Reform Backlog Reduction Strategy.

The Agency also implemented tools to refocus the criminal investigations activity onto the cases of highest risk and priority, which supported the removal of a record number of inadmissible people from Canada (over 18,800) of which 1,975 were serious criminals. Moreover, the modernization of business processes strengthened operations, resulting in, for example, 2,374 weapons seizures, 2,556 tobacco seizures, intelligence-led seizures valued at $71 million, targeted seizures valued at $43.4 million, and crime seizures totaling almost $9.3 million.

The Agency continued to work with other border management administrations under its international capacity building program in 2012–13, collaborating with key stakeholders and participating in international fora to ensure assistance is provided to regions identified as Government of Canada and CBSA priorities. Finally, the Agency continued to support the Government of Canada's Free Trade Agreement negotiations throughout the year.

 

Priority

  • Implement ‘Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness' with the United States (U.S.).

Type

  • New 

Program Activities

  • Risk Assessment
  • Secure and Trusted Partnerships
  • Admissibility Determination
  • Immigration Enforcement

Summary of Progress

The Agency continued to play a key role in moving forward the Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness, a major transformational initiative for the Government of Canada that focuses on improving the facilitation of trade and travel across Canada's border with the U.S. and on protecting Canada's population from border-related risks. The CBSA led the development and implementation of 10 major Beyond the Border deliverables and contributed to 18 others.

The CBSA conducted extensive engagement activities with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. CBP) and other key partners to ensure the successful implementation of initiatives. Substantial progress has been made on all CBSA-led Beyond the Border initiatives. For example, the CBSA implemented a number of enhancements to the NEXUS program and completed the first phase of the Entry/Exit pilot to share routine biographic data on third-country nationals and permanent residents of both the U.S. and Canada. Finally, the CBSA launched three pilots to target high-risk cargo that is destined to the U.S. as part of the Integrated Cargo Security Strategy.

Please refer to the Beyond the Border Horizontal Initiative Report for a whole-of-government summary of progress made on the Action Plan to date, annexed to Public Safety Canada's Departmental Performance Report.

 

Priority

  • Implement the Change Agenda.

Type

  • Ongoing 

Program Activities

  • Admissibility Determination
  • Internal Services

Summary of Progress

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to implement its Change Agenda, a multi-year transformational initiative launched in 2009, to set the foundation for a more dynamic, responsive and service-oriented organization. Promoting a culture of service excellence, the Change Agenda's activities are centred on three themes: frontline service delivery, people management, and management excellence.

In 2012–13, the Agency improved frontline service delivery to Canadians. It decreased border wait times, despite repeated year-over-year highs in traveller volumes, and collected over $25.6 billion in revenue. This achievement was supported through the implementation of the CBSA's Service Improvement Plan as well as the implementation of the National Peak Period Strategy. In addition, the CBSA continued to consistently engage with stakeholders and enhance its professional standards through the development and implementation of a Professional Integrity Program and the introduction of the new CBSA Code of Conduct for its workforce.

The Agency continued to improve people management. It launched a new Officer Induction Training Program that integrates arming training in a streamlined national model to renew its workforce. The CBSA also developed national training standards for ten operational communities to focus on the skills and abilities required by employees to legally exercise the Agency's roles and responsibilities in a safe and secure manner.

Finally, among the important strides the Agency took in 2012–13 to advance management excellence was the further implementation of the CBSA Functional Management Model (FMM), notably through its functional 2013–16 integrated business planning process. The Agency developed tools to support managers in the implementation of the FMM, including the FMM Toolkit on the Ten Elements of Program Management Excellence and an outreach strategy to raise awareness of FMM across the Agency. It also further embedded risk management into the Agency's strategic and operational planning process, by conducting risk assessments and updating the Agency's risk toolkit, including the launching of an online risk management course.

Risk Analysis

Risk Table

Risk

Risk Response Strategy

Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Link to Organizational Priorities

Irregular Migration
The risk that the Agency will be unable to prevent irregular migration or intercept irregular migrants.

  • Establish a harmonized approach to pre-screening of travellers en route to Canada.
  • Improve the integrity of Canada’s immigration and refugee programs.
  • Establish an integrated entry and exit information system in conjunction with a similar system in the U.S.
  • Implement advance screening of travellers prior to their departure for Canada.
  • Collaborate with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to enhance sharing of information on travellers, immigration applicants and asylum seekers.

 

  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination
  • Immigration Enforcement
  • Criminal Investigations

Implement ‘Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness’ with the U.S.

Terrorism
The risk that terrorists and/or materials to support terrorist activities will enter or transit Canada.

  • Implement advance electronic reporting of cargo, conveyance, crew, and importer trade data.
  • Develop a joint Integrated Cargo Security Strategy to address risks associated with shipments arriving from offshore based on informed risk management.
  • Establish a harmonized approach to pre-screening of travellers en route to Canada.
  • Establish an integrated entry and exit information system in conjunction with a similar system in the U.S.
  • Collaborate with CIC to enhance sharing of information on travellers, immigration applicants and asylum seekers, as well as implement the Management Action Plan in response to the recommendations arising from the Office of the Auditor General of Canada Issuing Visas audit.

 

  • Risk Assessment
  • Secure and Trusted Partnerships
  • Admissibility Determination
  • Immigration Enforcement

 

Implement ‘Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness’ with the U.S.

Modernize the Agency's Business Processes.

Immigration Enforcement
The risk that inadmissible individuals posting significant criminal and/or security threats will not be removed from Canada in a timely fashion.

  • Improve the integrity of Canada’s immigration and refugee programs by implementing the CBSA components of initiatives aimed at reducing the abuse of the refugee determination system, and combating immigration fraud and human smuggling.
  • Establish an integrated entry and exit information system in conjunction with a similar system in the U.S.
  • Collaborate with CIC to enhance sharing of information on travellers, immigration applicants and asylum seekers.

 

  • Immigration Enforcement
  • Criminal Investigations

Implement ‘Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness’ with the U.S.

Modernize the Agency's Business Processes.

The three external risks that ranked highest in terms of risk exposure for the Agency are: Terrorism, Irregular Migration, and Immigration Enforcement.

Canada and the U.S. have been identified as targets by Al-Qaeda, and have faced the emergence of homegrown terrorists, sympathizers and affiliates of transnational terrorist entities. Intercepting national security threats at any point along the travel continuum will remain an essential priority of the CBSA and its partners in the domestic and international intelligence and enforcement communities.

The Government of Canada's counter-terrorism strategy, in place since 2012, sets out basic principles and elements to serve as a means of prioritizing and evaluating the Government's efforts against Terrorism. Many initiatives undertaken within the Beyond the Border Action Plan will contribute to mitigating this risk, including the Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) program, the Entry/Exit Initiative and the Integrated Cargo Security Strategy.

In terms of Irregular Migration, the desirability of Canada as a primary destination for irregular migrants remains high, due to factors such as: a relatively stable economy, its multicultural make-up, and high refugee acceptance rate. The CBSA has undertaken proactive measures to reduce the risk of this threat occurring, including enhancing information sharing with both domestic and international enforcement and intelligence partners, through the expanded profile of the Agency's International Network. Once fully implemented, a number of initiatives in the Beyond the Border Action Plan will also contribute to mitigating this risk. These include the IAPI, Entry/Exit, and the Biometrics programs.

Finally, the success of the “Wanted by the CBSA” program highlights the value of Immigration Enforcement to the Canadian public. This initiative contributed to the apprehension of 37 high-profile individuals, with 25 of those individuals removed in 2012. To date this program has led to the successful removal from Canada of 32 criminal foreign nationals. This protects Canadians by directly reducing risk exposure to serious criminality within our borders. The implementation of the Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration pilot program in the Greater Toronto Area has also served to increase the Agency's ability to manage low-risk removals. These initiatives, among others, over the course of 2012, have allowed the Agency to remove over 18,800 inadmissible individuals from Canada, representing a 27% increase from 2009.

Summary of Performance

The tables below provide a summary of the Agency's overall performance and demonstrate linkages between resources and results. It depicts the CBSA's total financial resources, total authorities and actual spending for the 2012–13 fiscal year, in addition to a summary of the total planned and actual human resources for the Agency.

Financial Resources – Total Departmental ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
201213

Planned Spending
201213

Total Authorities
(available for use) 201213

Actual Spending
(authorities used)
201213

Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending)

1,776,020

1,776,020

2,087,623

1,707,356

68,664

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents - FTEs)

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

14,034

14,641

(607)

Performance Summary Tables

Performance Summary Table
Strategic Outcome and Programs ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.

Program

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates 2012–13)

Planned Spending

Total Authorities
(available for use) 2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used) 

Alignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
[ i ]

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2012–13

2011–12

2010–11

Risk Assessment

154,899

154,899

139,254

138,242

215,859

121,512

117,258

118,419

A safe and secure world through international engagement

Secure and Trusted Partnerships

45,989

45,989

46,555

38,965

82,167

31,564

33,247

32,389

A safe and secure world through international engagement

Admissibility Determination

663,844

663,844

630,829

608,458

738,620

586,294

582,713

662,137

A safe and secure Canada

Criminal Investigations

23,752

23,752

23,620

23,578

24,614

26,442

27,185

19,983

A safe and secure Canada

Immigration Enforcement

160,981

160,981

144,658

141,756

197,266

150,469

150,516

91,489

A safe and secure Canada

Recourse

10,246

10,246

9,971

9,673

10,454

11,118

12,674

11,132

A fair and secure marketplace

Revenue and Trade Management

69,967

69,967

74,836

63,918

83,373

73,463

75,965

68,384

A fair and secure marketplace

Strategic Outcome
Sub-Total

1,129,678

1,129,678

1,069,723

1,024,590

1,352,353

1,000,862

999,558

1,003,933

 

Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ thousands)

Internal Services

Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 2012–13)

Planned Spending

Total Authorities (available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2012–13

2011–12

2010–11

 

646,342

646,342

610,430

514,602

735,270

706,494

835,739

691,619

Sub-Total

646,342

646,342

610,430

514,602

735,270

706,494

835,739

691,619

The decline of actual spending that began in 2012–13 and in future years for planned spending amounts can be attributed to the implementation measures related to the Deficit Reduction Action Plan.

Total Performance Summary Table ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome(s) and Internal Services

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates 2012–13)

Planned Spending

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2012–13

2011–12

2010–11

 

1,776,020

1,776,020

1,680,153

1,539,192

2,087,623

1,707,356

1,835,297

1,695,552

Total

1,776,020

1,776,020

1,680,153

1,539,192

2,087,623

1,707,356

1,835,297

1,695,552

The Agency has seen a minimal fluctuation by Program in both actual spending from 2010–11 to 2012–13 and planned spending from 2012–13 to 2014–15. Most variances can be attributed to the decrease in overall Agency funding moving forward as a result of the savings measures announced in Budget 2012. Other items contributing to the decrease are the transfer of funding to Shared Services Canada, Strategic Review and cost containment measure cuts, and the economic and fiscal statement realignment between fiscal years.

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend

Note: The CBSA does not have any sunsetting items for fiscal years 2013-14 to 2015-16.

The CBSA will achieve Budget 2012 savings of $143.4 million by fiscal year 2014–15 through efficiency measures and program reductions that align resources to its core mandate, scaling back where the need is reduced, transforming how it works internally, and by consolidating and streamlining programs and processes. With these changes, the CBSA will focus on supporting management excellence and accountability. In the first year of implementation, the CBSA's savings target is $31.3 million. Savings will increase to $72.8 million in 2013–14 and will result in ongoing savings of $143.4 million by 2014–15.

As a result of Budget 2012, the CBSA is implementing its plan to:

  • streamline and simplify our approach to internal services through the use of more technology and less cumbersome processes;
  • optimize programs to get better results at reduced costs;
  • transform programs in order to eliminate red tape, provide better services to Canadians, and reduce costs; and
  • adjust frontline service delivery where adjustments can be made without impacting service levels.

The CBSA will also receive increased funding based on the December 7, 2011 announcement of ‘Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness' with the U.S.. The CBSA has an interest in 28 different Action Plan deliverables spanning each of the 32 initiatives under the four principles in the Plan.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CBSA's organizational Votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on Public Works and Government Services Canada's website [ ii ].

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

The FSDS outlines the Government of Canada's commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets.

The CBSA ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. The Agency contributes to the following FSDS 2010–2013 themes as denoted by the visual identifiers and associated programs below.

Theme III: Protecting NatureTheme III: Protecting Nature

Admissibility Determination Program

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Begining with GovernmenTheme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Begining with Government

Internal Services

During 2012–13 the CBSA considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals [ iii ]. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, departmental initiatives were found to have positive environmental effects on the 2010–2013 FSDS goals and targets in Themes III – Protecting Nature, and IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. Further information on the results of the SEAs are available in the Agency's Sustainable Development Strategy 2011–2013[ iv ].

For additional details on the Agency's activities to support sustainable development and SEA, please see Section II of the Departmental Performance Report and the CBSA website. For complete details on the FSDS, please visit the Environment Canada departmental website[ v ].

Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

The CBSA has one strategic outcome supported by seven programs. The strategic outcome and seven supporting programs focus on the Agency's mandate and responsibility to support Canada's national security priorities, and facilitate the movement of legitimate people and goods, including food, plants and animals, across the border.

The analysis of performance results is presented at the program level in order to facilitate the reporting on the Agency's commitments contained in the 2012–13 CBSA Report on Plans and Priorities. Moving forward, the Agency will report its performance results at the lowest level of its Program Alignment Architecture.

Strategic Outcome and Supporting Program Activities

Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.

Description: The strategic outcome focuses on the Agency's mandate and responsibility to support Canada's national security priorities, while facilitating the legitimate cross border movement of people and goods, including food, plants, animals and related products.

Supporting Programs:

  • Risk Assessment
  • Secure and Trusted Partnerships
  • Admissibility Determination
  • Criminal Investigations
  • Immigration Enforcement
  • Recourse
  • Recourse

Programs and Sub-Programs

Program: Risk Assessment

Program Description:

The Risk Assessment program “pushes the border out” by seeking to identify high-risk people, goods and conveyances as early as possible in the travel and trade continuum to prevent inadmissible people and goods from entering Canada. This benefits the travelling public and the trade community by enabling the Agency to focus its examination and interdiction activities on high-risk people and goods, thereby facilitating the entry of low-risk travellers and goods. The Agency uses automated risk assessment systems and intelligence to identify potential risks to the security and safety of people and goods.

Financial Resources – Risk Assessment ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

154,899

154,899

215,859

121,512

33,387

Human Resources (FTEs) – Risk Assessment

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

1,068

1,201

(133)

Performance Results – Risk Assessment

Expected Result

Performance Indicators

Target

Actual Result

Potential threats to the safety and security of Canada are identified and considered prior to arrival 

Percentage of threats that led to a result

3.1%

Not available*

*The actual result is not available due to system constraints. The Agency will be in a position to report on this indicator by the end of 2014.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities [ vi ]

Supporting Initiative: Develop a harmonized approach to screening inbound cargo arriving from offshore that will result in increased security and the expedited movement of secure cargo across the Canada-U.S. border, under the principle of “cleared once, accepted twice.”

As part of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, Canada and the U.S. have commenced the development of an integrated, multimodal customs and transportation security regime to reduce duplication and move activities away from their shared border. Once implemented, this regime will enhance the security supply chains, starting at the earliest possible point, ensuring the integrity of the “screened” cargo through to its destination. The initiative includes the mutual recognition of air cargo systems, the integration of advance data requirements for advance security screening and, finally, a joint strategy to address health, safety and security risks associated with inbound shipments from offshore.

In 2012–13, the CBSA, in collaboration with its U.S. counterparts, developed a common set of data elements to report on for all modes of transport to advance security screening of cargo. In addition, the CBSA developed an Integrated Cargo Security Strategy to address health, safety and security risks associated with inbound cargo shipments from offshore and to support expedited crossings at the border. As part of the Strategy several pilots were launched (e.g. Prince Rupert, Montréal, Pre-Load Air Cargo Targeting, and Tamper Evident Technology). The Strategy has been communicated to all key stakeholders.

Finally, in 2012–13, the CBSA established a Canada–U.S. working group (comprising the U.S. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. CBP and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency), which conducted a feasibility study concerning the interdiction of high-risk wood packaging material at the first point of arrival in North America. To support the study, the CBSA included wood packaging material inspections as a component of the in-transit pilots for Prince Rupert and Montréal. Early results of these pilots will be included in the study.

Supporting Initiative: Implement advance electronic reporting of cargo, conveyance, crew, and importer trade data to facilitate the risk assessment of shipments before arrival in Canada (eManifest)

The eManifest Program is designed to change the commercial import process to reflect the Agency's integrated risk management approach and keep pace with the changing global security environment. When fully implemented, carriers, freight forwarders, and importers in all modes of transportation will be required to provide the CBSA with advance trade data electronically, before the goods arrive in Canada, to enable advance screening. This will “push the border out” by initiating the screening process prior to the arrival of goods at the border. It will also facilitate the flow of goods across the border by reducing at-the-border controls.

In 2012–13, the Agency made substantial progress in implementing eManifest. The CBSA deployed an electronic system for rail carriers to provide advance cargo and conveyance data on commercial goods coming into Canada and actively engaged the largest carriers, which have begun transmission. The Agency also conducted stakeholder outreach to encourage highway carriers to voluntarily transmit eManifest data prior to the mandatory implementation date. Moreover, work was undertaken to deploy electronic systems that will allow freight forwarders in all modes of transportation to transmit advance house bill data to the CBSA. Finally, all business requirements have been defined to develop an electronic solution enabling importers to transmit advance trade data.

Supporting Initiative: Implement enhanced screening of travellers prior to their departure for Canada, using a common approach to screening

Introduce advance passenger information systems

In 2012–13, the CBSA, in collaboration with Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), initiated the development of an enhanced approach for identifying and interdicting inadmissible persons and security threats prior to their boarding a plane destined for Canada. The approach focuses on the implementation of two initiatives: the Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) initiative under CIC's leadership and the Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) initiative under the CBSA's.

Under the Agency's IAPI initiative, the air carrier will provide passenger data to the CBSA prior to flight departure. The CBSA's existing Advance Passenger Information / Passenger Name Record program is currently used to identify high-risk air travellers while they are en route to Canada. The IAPI initiative builds on the existing program and allows the CBSA to mitigate risk and increase security while simultaneously facilitating access to Canada for legitimate travellers.

Over the past year, the Agency began to identify the business requirements towards developing the system required to deploy the IAPI initiative in collaboration with other government departments (OGDs). Regulatory work has also begun to enable the implementation of the IAPI initiative. Consultations continue to be held regularly with the airline industry.
Once implemented, the eTA and IAPI initiatives will enable enhanced screening of travellers prior to their departure for Canada and will allow “board/no board” decisions to be made before the departure of inbound flights.

Once implemented, the eTA and IAPI initiatives will enable enhanced screening of travellers prior to their departure for Canada and will allow “board/no board” decisions to be made before the departure of inbound flights.

Implement a biographic traveller information-sharing capability with the U.S.

In 2012–13, the CBSA, in partnership with CIC, successfully negotiated the Immigration and Information Sharing Treaty between Canada and the U.S., signed on December 13, 2012. By entering into force, the Treaty allows for the systematic exchange of biographic (by fall 2013) and biometric information (by fall 2014). This Treaty will facilitate the sharing of information to improve immigration admissibility determination and the verification of the identities of travellers as well as reduce identity fraud, enhance screening decisions, and support a variety of administrative and enforcement actions.

Supporting Initiative: Modernize the processing of postal imports by introducing advance electronic information, targeting and risk assessment activities while addressing outdated infrastructure in order to facilitate the timely flow of legitimate mail across the border.

The CBSA and the CPC are collaborating to update the infrastructure and systems used to process international mail. This will lead to establishing an electronic information network to enhance risk management, facilitating the movement of low-risk mail items, and creating an enhanced international mail infrastructure that ensures the secure and efficient movement of international mail. By leveraging the use of advance electronic information to support targeting and risk assessment practices, the CBSA will have the opportunity to pursue new and more effective ways of intercepting high-risk goods.

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued physical upgrades to mail processing facilities to adequately address health, safety and security concerns related to the clearance of private and commercial cross-border shipments. The Agency completed all business and IT deliverables within the feasibility and planning phase of this initiative and continued to work closely with the CPC on the construction of the new CBSA Mail Centre in Vancouver, scheduled to be completed in 2014. The Agency has also begun consultations with the CPC to develop automated risk and rating systems.

Supporting Initiative: Implement a new Targeting Business Model and establish the National Targeting Centre

The CBSA's targeting process distinguishes between high-risk and low-risk goods and travellers in order to enhance security while facilitating the flow of goods and people across the border. The CBSA has committed to creating a robust, effective and efficient targeting program. To achieve this commitment, in 2012–13, the Agency established the Targeting Program Functional Authority and developed and implemented a new Targeting Business Model. More specifically, these initiatives strengthened the targeting program through, for example, standardizing targeting processes, as well as improving the Agency's response time to emergency situations and intelligence threats.

In 2012–13, the CBSA also established a 24/7 National Targeting Centre (NTC) located in the National Capital Region. The transition of the Agency's targeting functions to the NTC has begun, including completing the transition of air passenger, air cargo, and marine cargo targeting functions. The Agency also established the national targeting policy, designed and implemented a national standardized training framework, and established an on-site intelligence section at the NTC to provide intelligence support to the targeting officers through target and trend analysis. In addition, an agreement between the CBSA and the U.S. CBP was formalized, whereby a liaison officer is embedded within each partner's respective targeting centre. This single-tier approach for all risks reduces duplication and enhances the Agency's ability to identify border-related risks and prevents inadmissible people and goods from entering Canada.

Program: Secure and Trusted Partnerships

Program Description:

Through the Secure and Trusted Partnerships program, the CBSA works closely with clients, OGDs and international border management partners to enhance trade chain and traveller security while providing pre-approved, low-risk travellers and traders with streamlined and efficient border processes. The CBSA develops and administers programs and cooperative agreements with its partners to ensure alignment with international standards (e.g. World Customs Organization SAFE Framework of Standards) and promotes best practices in global border management. By increasing membership in trusted traveller and trader programs, the CBSA is able to improve its capacity to mitigate risk in advance and focus examination efforts on identifying travellers and traders of unknown or higher risk.

Financial Resources – Secure and Trusted Partnerships ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

45,989       

45,989

82,167

31,564

14,425

Human Resources (FTEs) – Secure and Trusted Partnerships

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

499

397

102

Performance Results – Secure and Trusted Partnerships

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Increased capacity to focus on high-risk people at the ports of entry

Percentage of trusted traveller passages out of all passages

 

8%

7.82%

Increased capacity to focus on high-risk goods at the ports of entry

Percentage of trusted trader passages out of all passages

Larger than 5%

Not available*

*The actual result is not available due to system constraints. The Agency is in the process of developing new tools to enable reporting on this indicator, which are expected to be in place by the end of 2013–14.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to review its Pre-border programs to create greater efficiencies. As part of this review, which included an examination of the Agency's trusted travellers and traders programs processes, policies and procedures, gaps and opportunities for program improvements were identified and analyzed. As the review goes forward, the Agency will ensure that program changes will be aligned and harmonized with the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Supporting Initiative: Enhance the Benefits of Programs that Help Trusted Businesses and Travellers Move Efficiently Across the Border 

Increase harmonized benefits to NEXUS members

The Trusted Traveller programs are designed to expedite the border clearance process for pre-approved, low-risk travellers entering Canada. The NEXUS program streamlines the border clearance process and is a joint initiative with U.S. CBP in the air, land and marine modes of transportation.

In 2012–13, under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, the CBSA undertook a number of enhancements to the NEXUS program. Specific activities included: working with U.S. CBP to increase benefits to NEXUS membership; streamlining the membership renewal process; attracting new members through a joint Canada-U.S. marketing campaign; extending NEXUS eligibility to Canadian and U.S. citizens who do not reside in either country; and developing a plan to incorporate third-country trusted traveller programs. Finally, the Agency undertook work to allow Canadian NEXUS members to be included in a U.S. Transportation Security Administration risk-based screening program at a number of U.S. airports, mirroring the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority activities at Canadian airports.

Increase benefits to participants of Partners in Protection and Customs Self Assessment by developing a framework for trusted trader programs

Trusted Trader programs simplify many border requirements for imports from pre-approved, low-risk participants so that shipments can be processed in a more efficient manner. In 2012–13, under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, the CBSA continued to work toward the harmonization of Canada's Partners in Protection (PIP) program with the U.S. Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) program in order to strengthen benefits and expand membership. Key areas of progress included the development of a joint application process that will allow current members of either program, as well as new applicants, to obtain a harmonized membership for both programs using a single application process. The PIP and C-TPAT programs developed harmonized policies to ensure both programs are delivered consistently.

In 2012–13, the CBSA also expanded the Customs Self Assessment (CSA) program by implementing new trade-related benefits that allow approved CSA importers to voluntarily demonstrate that their business systems, internal controls and self-testing processes are effective and reliable at ensuring their trade program compliance. The implementation of this trade compliance benefit aligns CSA benefits with those available to U.S. importers who are members of the Importer Self Assessment (ISA) program.

Finally, in 2012–13, the CBSA conducted a review of the volume and infrastructure at the ten busiest commercial ports to determine possible areas for expansion of its Free and Secure Trade (FAST) commercial benefit with the goal of facilitating a greater number of low-risk shipments at the border and optimizing benefits for trusted traders. This review will support the identification of future investments in FAST sites.

Supporting Initiative: Implement physical infrastructure upgrades including potential use of shared plazas/facilities

Enhance facilities to support Trusted Trader/Traveller programs

As a result of the implementation of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, the CBSA and U.S. CBP will, wherever feasible, align the number of NEXUS lanes and/or booths at ports of entry to accommodate the expected increase in NEXUS membership. In 2012–13, the CBSA opened five new NEXUS lanes at the following locations: Sarnia, Ont.; Fort Erie, Ont.; Douglas, B.C.; Abbotsford, B.C.; and Pacific Highway, B.C. In addition, a six-month pilot project was launched in October 2012 at specific locations to allow for the use of FAST lanes or booths for all members of the CBSA's trusted trader programs. Key progress related to this pilot project included the installation of the required technology to monitor the traffic patterns of the FAST pilot participants and the collection of baseline data. Once the pilot project has concluded, the CBSA will complete a review of its FAST lane capacity to determine if future investments are required to support the expansion of the program.

Supporting Initiative: Accelerate implementation of the Single Window Initiative and align it as much as possible to the U.S. Single Window equivalent

The Single Window Initiative is a CBSA-led interdepartmental initiative to improve service to the trade community by providing a single Government of Canada window through which businesses can electronically submit all information required to comply with commercial import regulations. The initiative responds to calls for action by the trade community to simplify processes at the border, reduce the paper burden, and integrate Government of Canada information requirements into the import process.

Under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, Canada and the U.S. will align their respective single window programs for imports entering their territory. Each country will seek to integrate the requirements of all government partners into their Single Window systems using a common design based on World Customs Organization (WCO) principles. The Single Window Initiative will leverage all the infrastructure improvements made through eManifest to not only streamline and improve the importation process for businesses but also to provide opportunities to develop Government of Canada coordinated risk assessment processes.

In 2012–13, the CBSA worked with U.S. CBP to identify opportunities to simplify the cross-border movement of commercial goods between the two countries and to fully implement and align their single window programs. The CBSA and the U.S. CBP worked together to complete a Canada-U.S. Data Alignment exercise, a CBSA-U.S. CBP Joint Trade Outreach Strategy and a CBSA-U.S. CBP Goods Identification Strategy.

In addition, the CBSA, in collaboration with the nine participating OGDs and the import community, began to identify the essential regulatory data requirements to be collected under the Single Window Initiative, as well as border process improvements for imported goods and the use of commodity/product identification codes to more accurately verify commercial goods. Another key area of progress included the design of the Integrated Import Declaration to enable the collection of data required to streamline business processes across departments and agencies, allowing the Government of Canada to maximize operational efficiencies while fulfilling its regulatory mandate.

Finally, the CBSA continued to engage with the WCO in the standardization of global trade documents in electronic format and worked towards full harmonization with the WCO Data Model, which is expected to be completed by the spring 2014.

Supporting Initiative: Implement Strategic Framework for Engagement with the U.S.

In 2012–13, the CBSA implemented the Strategic Framework for Engagement with the U.S. to support the advancement of the Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives and to strengthen the Agency's relationships with U.S. government partners and stakeholders.

Supporting Initiative: Strengthen International Capacity Building Partnerships

Under its international capacity building program, and in coordination and collaboration with key stakeholders such as the WCO, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the Canadian International Development Agency, in 2012–13 the Agency successfully conducted, with other border management administrations, 94 activities that contribute to the efforts of mitigating threats to Canada.

More specifically, throughout 2012–13, 12 modernization initiatives took place under the auspices of the Haiti Revenue Mobilization Project with an emphasis on giving Haiti Customs the tools to ensure its long-term sustainable development, including: targeting abilities to ensure appropriate referral following primary examination; post-import control units; training skills for trainers; protocol and guideline drafting to help provide tools to develop new arrangements with partners; key competency skills for managers; and sponsoring a candidate to participate in the WCO Fellowship program. In addition, contributing to the Government of Canada's efforts to combat human smuggling in South East Asia, the Agency worked with Thailand in the areas of intelligence analysis, document integrity and border controls, and with Indonesia in enhancing vessel rummaging techniques. The Agency also provided strategic and technical assistance to the Afghanistan-Pakistan Co-operation Process including chairing three Customs Data Exchange Technical Working Group meetings and carrying out a Needs Assessment Mission on processing at the Torkham border crossing (between Pakistan and Afghanistan).

In 2012–13, the CBSA also continued with the implementation of its capacity building co-operation partnership with Mexico Customs by sharing expertise on recruit training and enforcement-related technical assistance. The Agency continued engagement with Columbia to identify fraudulent documents and imposters and mitigate threats to border security. The CBSA also successfully concluded an aviation security project (air cargo and air passenger interdiction) in Central America and the Caribbean that was managed in cooperation with the Organization of American States Inter-American Committee Against Terrorism. Finally, the CBSA established a public-private sector partnership to deliver a two-year capacity building project on marine commercial targeting in Panama that will continue into 2013–14.

Program: Admissibility Determination

Program Description:

Through the Admissibility Determination program, the CBSA develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships that enable border services officers to intercept people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada, and to process legitimate people and goods seeking entry into Canada within established service standards. In addition, the Agency develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships to control the export of goods from Canada.

In the traveller stream, border services officers question people upon arrival to determine if they and their personal goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Border services officers will then make a decision to grant entry or refer a person for further processing (e.g. payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document), and/or for a physical examination.

In the commercial stream, carriers and importers are required to provide information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers review the status of pre-arrival decisions and/or the provided accompanying documentation to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Based on this determination, a border services officer may refer the goods for further processing, examination and/or scientific or engineering analysis. Upon further examination, goods may be seized or penalties imposed. With some exceptions, all goods being exported from Canada must be reported “in writing” to the CBSA.

Financial Resources – Admissibility Determination ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

663,844

663,844

738,620

586,294

77,550

Human Resources (FTEs) – Admissibility Determination

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

6,641

6,360

281

Performance Results – Admissibility Determination

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

 Targets

Actual Results

People and goods that are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at ports of entry or within Canada

Percentage of people examined who are inadmissible and/or arrested

0.50%

2.3%

Percentage of goods examined that are seized 0.30% 0.05%*

Legitimate people and goods entering Canada at a land port of entry are processed within established service standards

Percentage of people and goods reaching the primary inspection booth within the time standards (10 minutes on weekdays; 20 minutes on weekends and holidays)
 

 

 

95%

96.94%

*The amount of goods seized can fluctuate as the movement of illicit goods remains out of the control of the CBSA

 

Selected Enforcement Statistics

2012–13
Performance

2011–12
Performance

Drug seizures 10,624 10,187
Prohibited weapons seized, including firearms 4,754 4,380
Tobacco seizures 2,551 2,308
Value of currency seized (value is approximate in $ thousands) 25,000 27,000
Meat, meat products, animals and animal products interceptions 35,914 31,311

Soil, plants and plant products interceptions

7,994 15,182
Contribution to Sustainable Development – Admissibility Determination Program

Theme III: Protecting NatureTheme III: Protecting Nature

The Admissibility Determination Program contributes to Theme III of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy – Protecting Nature. The Food, Plant and Animal Program within this program activity plays a vital role in preventing and managing the risks associated with the introduction of invasive alien species. In partnership with other key departments and agencies, the CBSA coordinates a rapid and effective response to the threat posed by invasive alien species to our nation's ecosystems and resource-based economies.

For more information on how the CBSA is Managing threats to ecosystems refer to the CBSA's Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report 2012-13[ vii ].

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Supporting Initiative: Establish an integrated entry and exit information system, in conjunction with a similar system in the U.S., that permits the record of an entry into one country to be used to establish an exit record from the other

As part of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, in 2012–13 the CBSA and U.S. CBP worked together to advance the establishment of an integrated entry and exit information system, with particular focus on the land border environment, in which a record of an entry into one country will be used to establish a record of exit from the other. The new entry-exit system will record the biographical data on travellers entering and exiting Canada.

In 2012–13, the Agency developed and launched the Phase I pilot project to exchange data with the U.S. on third-country nationals, lawful permanent residents of the U.S., and permanent residents of Canada. The information was securely exchanged and successfully reconciled against existing entry records already held for those individuals.

Supporting Initiative: Implement physical infrastructure upgrades including potential use of joint U.S./Canadian facilities

Develop a joint Border Infrastructure Investment Plan with the U.S. and implement physical infrastructure upgrades at select ports of entry

Port of entry facilities are integral to the CBSA's border operations. Physical capacity, systems and proper equipment are required to ensure that the CBSA can reliably process the volume of goods and people entering Canada within the Agency's border wait time standards. To meet both existing and future program needs, the CBSA is undertaking infrastructure replacements and upgrades.

In 2012–13, the CBSA (in collaboration with Transport Canada) developed a joint Border Infrastructure Investment Plan with the U.S. that identified the scope, required funding, schedule, and roles and responsibilities. The Agency has also announced physical infrastructure upgrades at four key border crossings (Emerson, Man.; Lacolle, Que.; North Portal, Sask.; and Lansdowne, Ont.).

Coordinate plans for physical infrastructure upgrades at small and remote ports of entry

In 2012–13, the CBSA and U.S. CBP worked together to develop and coordinate plans for physical infrastructure upgrades at small and remote ports of entry. A joint workplan for the development and implementation of consensus recommendations was included as an Annex to the Border Infrastructure Investment Plan.

Supporting Initiative: Improve client service and the efficiency of processes for travellers by expanding the use of self-service kiosks (Automated Border Clearance) at airports

The Automated Border Clearance (ABC) program is designed to process increased volumes of travellers, and offers a secure and viable alternative for border processing through the use of self-service kiosk technology for eligible passengers travelling on valid Canadian passports or valid Canadian permanent resident cards. The self-service kiosks read the required information from Canadian passports or permanent resident cards and process the declaration cards. The kiosk issues a receipt upon completion of the transaction that must be presented with the travel document to a designated border services officer for verification of the traveller's documents and confirmation of traveller's identity.

In 2012–13, the Agency expanded the Vancouver ABC  pilot project to Montréal's Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport and Toronto's Pearson International Airport Terminal 3. To date, over 2 million travellers have used ABC kiosks, reducing processing and border wait times.

Supporting Initiative: Enhance bi-national port operations committees

Building on the 20 land border bi-national port operations committees (BPOC) already established across the country, in June 2011, the CBSA and U.S. CBP jointly established eight additional committees at the major international airports in Canada that provide U.S. preclearance. Both the existing and new bi-national port operations committees play an important role in improving how the CBSA and U.S. CBP manage travel and trade flows and expedite the processing of travellers and goods. Also in 2012–13, an evaluation of the port operations committees was conducted resulting in the drafting of the BPOC Joint Review Plan, now in the consultation phase. This will lead eventually to the expansion of the committee model to additional land ports of entry.

Supporting Initiative: Advance excellence in frontline service delivery by improving service consistency through the Service Improvement Plan, integrity and professional standards, and consistent engagement with stakeholders

Service Improvement Plan 2012–13

In 2012–13, the Agency continued to enhance its culture of service excellence through the development and implementation of an Operational Service Improvement Plan (SIP) that included establishing cross-Agency Service Improvement Working Groups for the Air, Land, Trade, Marine, and Postal modes. Initiatives that were implemented in 2012–13 as part of the SIP included: implementing 13 new service standards (e.g. a Carrier Code service standard, a deliverable for the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan); standardizing the primary inspection line at all major airports; expanding the use of facilitative programs such as ABC; improving clients secondary experience by offering cash payment locations and point review in airports; standardizing and streamlining cruise ship processing at first point of arrival; improving clearance processing for low-risk shipments and importers; launching client service training initiatives; measuring client satisfaction through a feedback card at primary inspection lines; and implementing new technology (i.e. Trade Reporting and Extraction System) to improve the trade process.

Program: Criminal Investigations

Program Description:

Under the Criminal Investigations program, the CBSA protects the integrity of border-related legislation and contributes to public safety and Canada's economic security by investigating and pursuing the prosecution of travellers, importers, exporters and/or other persons who commit criminal offences in contravention of Canada's border-related legislation.

CBSA investigators review potential border legislation violations and gather evidence using a variety of investigative techniques, including search warrants and production orders. These violations include criminal offences under the Customs Act, Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, various food, plant and animal legislation, and other border-related legislation. In conjunction with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the CBSA pursues the prosecution of individuals or business entities who violate Canada's border-related legislation.

Financial Resources – Criminal Investigations ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

23,752

23,752

24,614

26,442

(2,690)

Human Resources (FTEs) – Criminal Investigations

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

280

273

7

Performance Results – Criminal Investigations

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Concluded prosecutions that result in a conviction

Percentage of concluded prosecutions that result in a conviction

85%

93%*

*Exceeded the target due to a fluctuation in complex cases.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Supporting Initiative: Implement management tools to refocus criminal investigations activity on the cases of highest risk and priority

In 2012–13, as per the recommendations of a diagnostic review of the Criminal Investigations program and the result of the Go Forward Strategy and Action Plan, the Agency implemented management tools focused on complex and high-risk cases that enabled tracking of the investigative process, resulting in a more effective and efficient program. The tools implemented included: a new national directive highlighting the national investigative priorities that focus on violations posing the highest risk to the safety of Canadians, economic security of Canada, and the integrity of Canada's immigration system; a new framework to guide CIC on the level of information required to support successful prosecutions; a revised referral policy that increases the threshold frontline officers must meet before referring a case to criminal investigations; and the use of embedded intelligence analysts within the Criminal Investigations program to assist in the targeting of high-risk complex cases.

In 2012–13, the CBSA also developed and implemented new performance indicators (e.g. percentage of success rates of referrals for prosecutions accepted by Crown Prosecutors) to monitor results to ensure that resources are focused on high-risk and high-priority violations of border legislation. The new performance indicators enable the Agency to measure the entire investigative continuum of criminal non-compliance between the referral and the opening of an investigation to the final verdict.

Finally, the Agency continued to conduct competency-based training to support investigators in completing complex investigations through acquiring forensic interview skills, major case management coordination and complex search warrant drafting capabilities.

Program: Immigration Enforcement

Program Description:

The Immigration Enforcement program determines whether foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada are identified and investigated, detained, monitored and/or removed from Canada.

Foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada believed to be inadmissible are investigated and may have a report written against them by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Depending on the type of inadmissibility, the merits of the report are reviewed by either a Minister's Delegate or an independent decision maker at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRBC), where a CBSA hearings officer represents the Minister of Public Safety. Subsequent to this review, a removal order may be issued against the foreign national or permanent resident in question. Removal orders issued against refugee claimants are conditional and do not come into force until the claim is abandoned, withdrawn or denied by the IRBC.

Financial Resources – Immigration Enforcement ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

160,981

160,981

197,266

150,469

10,512

Human Resources (FTEs) – Immigration Enforcement

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

1,130

934

196

Performance Results – Immigration Enforcement

Expected Result

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Immigration enforcement actions are focused on high-priority foreign nationals and permanent residents who pose a safety and/or security risk to Canada

Percentage of criminals removed annually out of all removals from Canada

11%

10%*

Percentage of criminals removed from Canada compared to the annual average criminal population in the removals inventory 100% 105%

Failed refugee claimants are removed from Canada in a timely manner

Percentage of failed refugee claimants removed from Canada within 12 months of a negative decision from IRB

 

80%

 

100%

*Although this target was not met, the overall number of criminals removed from Canada increased in 2012–13 by 3% compared to 2011–12.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Supporting Initiative: Improve the integrity of Canada's immigration and refugee programs by implementing the CBSA components of initiatives aimed at reducing the abuse of the refugee determination system and combating immigration fraud and human smuggling

Improve timeliness of removals for failed refugee claimants

On December 15, 2012 changes to Canada's refugee determination system were enacted under the Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act (Bill C-31) and the Balanced Refugee Reform Act (Bill C-11). These changes now enable more rapid processing of refugee claims, including speedier determination of refugee status by the Immigration and Refugee Board. In 2012–13, the Agency enhanced the systems and processes it relies on in its efforts to close the door on those who would abuse Canada's refugee determination system, and also took steps to facilitate voluntary departures of failed claimants. These important advances will reduce the inventory of outstanding removal orders against failed refugee claimants, and will allow the CBSA to emphasize removals of individuals deemed to pose a risk to public safety or national security.

In June 2012, the CBSA launched the Assisted Voluntary Returns and Reintegration (AVRR) pilot program in the Greater Toronto Area with the objective to encourage failed claimants to voluntarily leave Canada. This cost-effective and timely alternative to traditional removals assists low-risk claimants to voluntarily return to their countries of origin under conditions that afford them increased anonymity. In 2012–13, 1,602 individuals departed Canada under the AVRR pilot program.

Also in 2012–13, the CBSA's preparations for implementing refugee reforms included working with CIC and Shared Services Canada to introduce an electronic file sharing mechanism that allows the CBSA and CIC to share refugee claimant documents. A joint triage process for refugee claimants began in October 2012, and is expected to continue supporting the refugee determination process.

Other systems enhancements included several upgrades to the Agency's National Case Management System, including improved database management and automation of processes for refugee removals, Refugee Protection Division decisions, AVRR, Designation of Foreign Nationals and Pre-removal Risk Assessments.

Enhance Canada's capacity to deal with inadmissible foreign nationals

In 2012–13, the CBSA commenced an evaluation of possible alternative arrangements for performing the escorted removal function. The assessment will include the analysis of the current cost as well as a review of the current escort function policy and program to determine if cost savings can be obtained by improving the current process. Once completed, the evaluation will highlight potential cost savings and/or program improvement.

Supporting Initiative:  Collaborate with Citizenship and Immigration Canada to enhance the sharing of information on travellers, immigration applicants and asylum seekers to improve admissibility decisions.

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to collaborate with CIC to enhance the sharing of information on travellers, immigration applicants and asylum seekers to improve admissibility decisions, including such initiatives as systematic biographic and biometric information sharing (including asylum claimants) and criminal removals information sharing. In addition, both organizations worked closely to negotiate the Immigration Information Sharing Treaty with the U.S., signed in December 2012.

In 2012–13, the CBSA undertook a number of collaborative initiatives, including: the finalization of appendices on information management and technology, information sharing, shared services and human resources for CIC-CBSA's Memorandum of Understanding; the development of a joint CBSA-CIC agenda on mutual intelligence and enforcement priorities; the development of a CIC-CBSA vision for the replacement of the Field Operations Support System; and finally, to ensure program integrity and support for the CBSA's enforcement mandate, the renegotiation with the Government of Ontario of the CIC-CBSA Memorandum of Understanding for information sharing.

Program: Recourse

Program Description:

The Recourse program provides the business community and individuals with an accessible mechanism to seek an impartial review of service-related complaints, program decisions and enforcement actions taken by the CBSA. This program activity ensures that their decisions are fair, transparent and accurately reflect the Agency's policies and the Acts administered by the CBSA.

Individuals can complete a written submission if they disagree with an enforcement action or a program decision made by the CBSA or wish to submit a complaint or compliment about services. Clients are provided with a timely acknowledgement of their correspondence, before CBSA officials conduct a thorough review, taking into consideration the legislation administered by the Agency, CBSA policies, the client's point of view and, where necessary, technical opinions from CBSA experts or legal advice from the Department of Justice Canada. Individuals who are not satisfied with the CBSA's review can appeal to the appropriate court, tribunal or external review body.

The Recourse program also facilitates the review of external complaints of discrimination filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and assists the Department of Justice Canada representing the Agency on appeals to the Federal Court, various tribunals and other external bodies.

Financial Resources – Recourse ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

10,246

10,246

10,454

11,118

(872)

Human Resources (FTEs) – Recourse

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

100

112

(12)

Performance Results – Recourse

Expected Result

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual Results

Initial contact with the appellant is timely

Percentage of enforcement appeals acknowledged within 15 days

85%

68%*

Timely decisions made in support of border services legislation

Percentage of undecided enforcement appeals over 18 months of age

 

Less than 20%

 

 

9%

 

Decisions rendered by Recourse are consistent with border-related legislation

Percentage of Recourse decisions upheld by the courts or tribunals

 

85%

 

80%

* Actions have been taken to improve the actual results of this indicator for 2013–14, including improving the internal processing of appeals and launching the new e-appeals form on the CBSA website to provide clients with an instant acknowledgement of their appeal.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Supporting Initiative: Enhance the Recourse program monitoring process

In 2012–13, the CBSA enhanced the Recourse program monitoring process by developing and implementing a new quality assurance methodology and conducting a quality assurance review of the Enhanced Complaints Mechanism responses. In addition, the Agency reviewed and improved the Recourse program's key performance indicators and service standards.

A feedback mechanism has also been developed to provide the results of the Agency's decisions and litigation, and of the Enhanced Complaints Mechanism to program managers. This feedback process will help to improve the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the Agency by ensuring that program managers have access to timely and relevant information on Recourse decisions.

Supporting Initiative: Reduce backlog of outstanding files related to appealed enforcement actions

In 2012–13, the CBSA was successful in achieving its previously committed goals to reduce to zero the backlog of workable appeals older than two years and to reduce the overall backlog of appeals to 2,500 or fewer. The number of workable appeals older than two years has been reduced to zero. As for the inventory of backlog files, it has been reduced to 1,580 during 2012–13 from 4381 appeals in 2010. Going forward, this achievement will enable the Recourse program to process its files in a more efficient, consistent and timely manner.

Program: Revenue and Trade Management

Program Description:

The Revenue and Trade Management program ensures that duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are collected in compliance with Canadian trade and imports reporting requirements. For the purposes of this program description, “duties” means any duties or taxes levied or imposed on imported goods under certain Acts that the CBSA is responsible for administering. This program administers international and regional trade agreements, and domestic legislation and regulations governing trade in commercial goods. Through its work on free trade negotiations, it helps to strengthen international rules related to trade and open new markets for Canadians.

Financial Resources – Revenue and Trade Management ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

69,967

69,967

83,373

73,463

(3,496)

Human Resources (FTEs) – Revenue and Trade Management

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

861

875

(14)

Performance Results – Revenue and Trade Management

Expected Result

Performance Indicators

Targets

Actual results

Duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are collected in accordance with trade policies

TBD

TBD

$25.6 billion*

 

*Amount of duties and taxes collected in 2012–13 by the CBSA.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The CBSA achieved the following progress against the commitments made in its 2012–13 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Supporting Initiative: Modernize the assessment and collection of revenue from importers to improve accuracy and minimize time delays

Improve accuracy and minimize time delays through the CBSA's Assessment and Revenue Management initiative

The CBSA collected more than $25 billion in duties, taxes and fees in 2012–13. To better account for this massive flow of cash, and to properly serve Canadians, the CBSA needs a more efficient and effective revenue management system to replace the current outdated one. The CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM) initiative, a multiyear transformational project enabled by information technology, will allow the Agency to streamline its procedures and automate the many labour-intensive processes required to collect, assess, manage and report on revenues effectively. The CARM initiative will address concerns raised by the Office of the Auditor General regarding the need to modernize revenue collection by replacing antiquated systems, reducing the use of paper forms and manual processes, and providing an e-commerce solution for clients.

Building on the extensive preparatory work undertaken in recent years, work continued toward the 2014 implementation of the first component of the CARM initiative, the Accounts Receivable Ledger (a client-based accounting and revenue management system that provides the opportunity for commercial clients to receive electronic monthly statements of account that consolidates all their CBSA transactions). Key advancements in the CARM initiative included: receiving the trade communities endorsement on the Agency's approach for client identification; adopting the business number as the unique identifier for all CBSA commercial clients; implementing the eServices strategy to improve services provided to commercial clients; developing a decommission strategy for the replacement of legacy systems; and commencing an impact assessment on trade applications to define IT solutions. In addition, the Office of the Auditor General commended the work that was done by the CBSA in successfully resolving the outstanding Revenue Ledger reconciliations for the past 10 years.

Supporting Initiative: Support the Government of Canada's Free Trade Agreement negotiations

Through its work on free trade negotiations, the Agency helps to strengthen international rules related to trade and to open new markets for Canadians by increasing the opportunities for, and the predictability of, export sales. This work contributes to the creation of jobs and boosts Canadian profits that, in turn, stimulate the economy. This program activity also helps to increase imports, making more products available at more affordable prices.

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to participate in Free Trade Agreement negotiations with international partners including: India, Morocco, the Caribbean Community, Ukraine, Costa Rica, Honduras, the European Union, Trans-Pacific Partnership, South Korea, and Japan. In addition, the Agency successfully implemented the Canada-Jordan Free Trade Agreement and undertook policy work to prepare for the implementation of amendments to the Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement.

Internal Services

Internal Services is a group of related activities and resources that is administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. The main activities are governance and management support (management and oversight, communications, legal services), resource management services (human resources management, financial management, information management, information technology, travel, and other administration services) and asset management services (real property, materiel, acquisitions). The CBSA's Internal Services supports the achievement of the Agency's strategic outcome.

Financial Resources – Internal Services ($ thousands)

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates) 2012–13

Planned Spending
2012–13

Total Authorities
(available for use)
2012–13

Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13

Difference

646,342

646,342

735,270

706,494

(60,152)

Human Resources (FTEs) –  Internal Services

Planned
2012–13

Actual
2012–13

Difference
2012–13

3,456

4,490

(1,034)

Contribution to Sustainable Development – Internal Services

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Begining with Government

Internal Services plays a significant role in helping the Agency meet its commitments under Theme IV of the Federal Sustainable Development targets – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. This theme is comprised of targets all sharing the goal of greening government operations.

The Agency has made important achievements in all priority areas including: green buildings, greenhouse gas emissions, electronic and electrical waste, printing units, paper consumption, green meetings and green procurement.

For details on the CBSA's activities related to these target areas, please refer to the 2012–13 CBSA Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report[ viii ].

Implementing the Change Agenda

In 2012–13, the Agency completed the last year of a four-year transformation under its Change Agenda initiative, focusing on frontline service, human resources management, and management excellence.

Supporting Initiative: Advance excellence in frontline service delivery by improving service consistency through the Service Strategy and commitments, integrity and professional standards, and consistent engagement with stakeholders

Develop the Port of Entry Capacity Check Program

The CBSA has developed the Port of Entry Capacity Check (PCC) tool to advance excellence in frontline service delivery. The PCC enables port of entry capacity to be assessed across three elements of operations: people management; frontline service and operational management; and control. The PCC supports continuous improvement by enabling the highest priority capacity needs to be identified and targeted for improvement at each individual port of entry. The Agency continued in 2012–13 with PCC assessments of eight small, medium, and large ports of entry across the country.

Improve the emergency preparedness of the Agency

The CBSA recently introduced an operational exercise strategy that aligns with the operational priorities of the Agency and those of domestic U.S. partner organizations. This effort combined with the issues management process and the changes taking place in the recently renovated facility for the Border Operations Centre allows the Agency to better predict, monitor, react and recover from significant events that will impact border travel and service delivery.

In 2012–13, the Agency completed regional operational business resumption and business continuity plans. These plans will ensure that the economic prosperity and the competitive advantage of Canada is maintained during an emergency by keeping the border open and by supporting trade through predictable border services. The CBSA also conducted emergency exercises in all regions. Six of the seven CBSA regions tested and validated their business resumption and continuity plans to ensure their effectiveness. The Prairie Region will complete this testing in 2013–14.

Integrity and professional standards

In 2012–13, the Agency began the development and implementation of a Professional Integrity Program. More specifically, in 2012–13, the Agency developed the Professional Integrity Program Management Framework as well as the content for online and instructor-led professional integrity awareness material and communication products. The CBSA also delivered several in-person awareness sessions and continued outreach to law enforcement agencies within Canada and abroad to share related material, best practices, lessons learned, and program progress. These steps along with enhanced security screening standards and other measures better align the CBSA with the standards in place in other Canadian and international law enforcement agencies.

Increase frontline official languages service delivery capacity in regions with serious gaps

The linguistic rights of the public are established in the Official Languages Act and its related Regulations and policies. The Act and policies are based on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and provide for the delivery of service from federal institutions in English and French, Canada's two official languages. The CBSA, as a representative of the Government of Canada, is committed to communicating with and serving the public in the official language of choice in designated offices and facilities.

In 2012–13, the Agency continued to provide language training to border services officers in regions with a clear need for bilingual frontline service staff. The CBSA also used targeted staffing mechanisms (e.g. assignments and deployments of bilingual officers) in vulnerable regions, and recruited 25 bilingual officers through the new Officer Induction Training Program and placed them in areas with bilingual needs.

The Agency further increased its bilingual capacity in 2012–13 by developing and implementing planning tools for the determination of bilingual capacity requirements at ports of entry to support shift-planning, as well as by developing an integrated Official Languages Training Strategy to provide and secure the efficient and consistent delivery of official languages training across the CBSA.

Reinforcing the CBSA Brand

The Branding Initiative helps to reinforce the identity and culture of the CBSA by providing a unifying image and collective sense of purpose for the Agency and its employees to embrace. Along with enhancing its organizational culture, branding also helps increase the public's recognition and trust of the CBSA by positioning the Agency as an organization known for the quality of its workforce and the contributions it makes to Canadian security and prosperity.

In 2012–13, the Agency undertook a number of activities in support of the branding initiative including, for example, implementing the name tags program and developing a new design of rank structure. The Agency also continued to support the Ceremonial Program and outreach activities with the tourism and business communities in 2012–13.

Finally, in 2012–13, the Agency opened the new arming training facilities at the CBSA College. This provided the Agency the opportunity to reinforce the CBSA brand by increasing the Agency's visibility. The College has fully implemented the wearing of new CBSA accoutrements on uniforms.

Improving the usability of the CBSA's Internet site and increasing the use of social media to enhance frontline service delivery

In 2012–13, the CBSA successfully completed and launched its mobile website, which improved the accessibility of information on the Agency's programs and services. The Agency also completed an inventory of all files on the website and developed a strategy to archive or convert all content to the new Government of Canada mandated usability template by July 2013. The CBSA increased the effectiveness of its website's search engine, and implemented a more sophisticated statistical reporting tool for the Web to make better decisions on content placement and promotion on the CBSA website.

Finally, in 2012–13, the CBSA formally moved its social media activities and channels (e.g. Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter) out of the pilot phase and regularized it as an ongoing activity within the Agency. The CBSA's social media communications activities continued to exceed expectations. Memberships have consistently surpassed targets. Moving forward, the CBSA will continue to look for new ways to promote its program services, using video, images and text where appropriate.

Consistent engagement with stakeholders

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to regularly consult with its stakeholders about its strategies, policies, operational programs and administrative procedures. It engaged with the Border Commercial Consultative Committee and the Air Consultative Committee members throughout the fiscal year. More specifically, in 2012–13, three meetings were held with each group, contributing to the Agency's ongoing dialogue with key stakeholders. All meetings were well attended. These meetings serve to promote collaboration between the CBSA and its stakeholder community on border matters to the benefit of Canada and the Canadian economy, and to enable the Agency to communicate important messages on enhancements to its programs and services in a timely and consistent fashion.

In addition, in 2012–13, the CBSA established the link to Service Canada's Consulting with Canadians website. This allows CBSA members to post information about consultations and advisory committees, and helps to ensure that the CBSA meets the Government of Canada's policy to inform Canadians and clients of opportunities to participate in public consultation and citizen engagement activities. This website has enabled the Agency to post items for consultation in support of developing or amending programs, policies and initiatives.

Finally, the Agency responded to a total of 67 event invitations from stakeholders in 2012–13. The CBSA also documented, through the stakeholder engagement reporting process, more than 220 stakeholder engagement activities that took place across Canada. Many of these activities were communicated with government partners to assist with government-wide coordination of stakeholder engagement initiatives.

Supporting Initiative: Improve people management by reinforcing the alignment between human resources services and program/operational requirements and by supporting the development of management capacity

The implementation of a new induction model for the CBSA

In 2012–13, the CBSA developed and implemented the new Officer Induction Training Program for all entry-level officers. The online portion of the pilot course was launched in December 2012 and the residential phase commenced in January 2013.

The new CBSA's Officer Induction Training Program uses an integrated induction model that includes a national recruitment process, a renewed online and residential training program for recruits and a structured developmental curriculum following graduation. Collectively, these elements better prepare officer trainees to fulfill their role as CBSA officers within the context of the Agency's mandate.

The new program enables the Agency, through strategic recruitment, to attract and retain quality candidates that possess the right mix of experience, skills and abilities to form part of the future CBSA workforce and meet the Agency's goals.

Arming Initiative

In 2012–13, the CBSA developed and implemented the 2012–16 Arming Implementation Plan that provided the blueprint for the successful completion of the Arming Initiative, including accelerating the pace at which arming training is provided. In 2012–13, the Agency completed construction and opened a state-of-the-art arming training facility at the CBSA College in Rigaud, Quebec and centralized regional training campuses, which increased the Agency's training capacity while increasing efficiencies.

Also, in 2012–13, other key achievements related to the Arming Initiative included: launching an electronic system for national incident management reporting; completing an Arming program CSA to better assess the effectiveness of controls of the Arming program; and working closely with Public Safety Portfolio partners to find efficiencies (e.g. developed common training standards and increased the use of training-related technology and share-training infrastructure).

The CBSA also incorporated arming elements into the Port Program Assessment to ensure regional compliance with Use of Force equipment policies and implemented phase two of the Arming Policy Review.

Supporting Initiative: Improve the delivery of the CBSA's programs to ensure national consistency through comprehensive program reviews, integrated planning, functional program management, and performance monitoring

Continue to functionalize Agency programs

The Functional Management Model has been gradually introduced since 2009 as part of the Agency's Change Agenda to improve national program consistency and to link program performance and risk considerations to the establishment of program priorities and the efficient management of resources. The model is organized around 10 functional programs that are aligned to the Agency's Program Alignment Architecture and account for all of the Agency's resources and expenditures. Finally, the Agency functionalized the 2013–16 Integrated Business Planning process which included identifying priorities and funding requirements for each program through the development of Resource Allocation Models.

Maturing the Enterprise Risk Management Program

The Agency established the Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) program to ensure a more consistent, systematic and disciplined approach to managing risks to better inform the decision-making process. This approach is in line with the expectations of good management identified by Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and the Office of the Auditor General.

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to mature its ERM program by ensuring that Agency-wide decisions are supported by complete and integrated risk information. The Agency completed Branch and functional program risk assessments and associated risk profiles to support the development of the 2013 CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile. In addition to providing risk management training to senior managers, the CBSA continued to build and maintain risk management capacity across the Agency through the promotion of its tools.

Advance Strategic Resource Management within the Agency

In 2012–13, the CBSA continued to mature its Strategic Resource Management Framework. The Agency introduced a new process to allocate budgets for 2013–14 by functional program. This, in turn, assisted the Agency's senior management in the decision-making process, leading to the internal reallocation of resources to the highest-priority activities and the areas of greatest risk. In 2012–13, the CBSA also worked on refining its financial system requirements to improve the timeliness and accuracy of reporting within the Agency. Finally, in 2012–13, the Agency provided users monthly training on its financial forecasting tool.

Modernize the Agency's information technology systems and information management

In 2012–13 the CBSA continued to implement its multiphase plan to mitigate the risks related to aging information technology risks as identified in the 2010 Spring Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 1, “Aging Information Technology Systems”[ ix ] and a subsequent Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat identification exercise. The CBSA is working closely with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and Shared Services Canada and other key service providers on assessing its business applications and technology platforms to align with the Government of Canada strategic technology vision and direction. The Agency continued to modernize its information technology systems and information management. Examples include: commencing the deployment of a Functional Information Classification Structure, planning the deployment of the GCDOCS (Government of Canada approved common system) technology, completing a National File Storage analysis and plan, and continuing the implementation of an Information Management Awareness Strategy.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

For financial reporting purposes, the activities of the Agency have been divided into two sets of financial statements: Agency Activities and Administered Activities. The financial statements for Agency Activities include those operational revenues and expenses that are managed by the Agency and used in running the organization. The financial statements for Administered Activities include those net revenues that are administered for entities other than the Agency, such as the federal government, a province or territory, or another group or organization. The purpose of the distinction between Agency and Administered Activities is to facilitate, among other things, the assessment of the administrative efficiency of the Agency in achieving its mandate.

Financial Statements

Agency Activities

Canada Border Services Agency
Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013
($ thousands)

 

2012–13
Planned
Results

2012–13
Actual

2011–12
Actual

$ Change (2012–13 Planned vs. Actual)

$ Change (2012–13 Actual vs. 2011–12 Actual)

Total expenses

1,945,657

1,824,784

1,877,490

120,873

(52,706)

Total revenues

18,792

14,896

11,999

3,896

2,897

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

1,926,865

1,809,888

1,865,491

116,977

(55,603)

Departmental net financial position

 

335,603

269,329

 

66,274

The decrease of $52.7 million in total expenses mainly relates to a decrease in salary and employee benefits, and a decrease in professional and special services due to the creation of Shared Services Canada.
The change in net financial position is a result of the change in expenses, revenues and government funding and transfers.

The change in net financial position is a result of the change in expenses, revenues and government funding and transfers.

Agency Activities

Canada Border Services Agency
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013
($ thousands)

 

2012–13

2011–12

$ Change

Total net liabilities

453,932

420,705

33,227

Total net financial assets

137,752

103,611

34,141

Departmental net debt

318,823

319,729

(906)

Total non-financial assets

654,426

589,058

65,368

Departmental net financial position

335,603

269,329

66,274

The increase of $33.2 million in total net liabilities is mainly attributed to an increase in accrued liabilities. The increase of $34.1 million in total net financial assets is mainly attributable to an increase of $30.9 million in Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is due to timing differences in salary payments at year-end. The increase of $65.4 million in total non-financial assets is related to an increase in tangible capital assets that in turn is attributable to an increase in assets under construction related mainly to eManifest. The change in net financial position reflects the changes in assets and liabilities.

Administered Activities

Canada Border Services Agency
Condensed Statement of Administered Revenues (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013
($ thousands)

 

2012–13
Actual

2011–12
Actual

$ Change
(2012–13 Actual vs. 2011–12 Actual)

Total tax revenue

25,593,064

25,113,359

479,705

Total non-tax revenue

26,405

24,388

2,017

Less: bad debt

35,895

53,146

(17,251)

Net results

25,583,574

25,084,601

498,973

Note: The Canada Border Services Agency Administered Activities are not subject to produce future oriented financial statements. Therefore, no 2012–13 planned results are presented in this statement.

Revenues reported within the Administered Activity financial statements were $25,619 million for 2012–13, an increase of $481 million (2 percent) over the total revenues of $25,138 million for 2011–12. These results are supported by trade data from Statistics Canada that show a year-over-year increase in imports of 2 percent.

Canada Border Services Agency
Condensed Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013
($ thousands)

 

2012–13

2011–12

$ Change

Total administered assets

3,332,849

3,305,513

27,336

Total administered liabilities

288,197

297,351

(9,154)

Net amount due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) on behalf of the Government of Canada          

3,044,652

3,008,162

36,490

Total administered liabilities and net amount due to the CRF on behalf of the Government of Canada

3,332,849

3,305,513

27,336

The results from the Statement of Administered Assets and Liabilities remain stable year over year, showing an increase in total assets of 0.83 percent over the total assets recorded in 2011–12, and a decrease in total liabilities of 3 percent over the total liabilities recorded in 2011–12. The decrease in total liabilities is mainly attributed to a decrease in the accounts payable to other federal government departments and agencies.

2012–13 Financial Highlights Charts – Agency Activities

Asset by Type

Tangible capital assets represent the largest portion at $643 million (81 percent) of total assets.

Liabilities by Type

Employee future benefits represent the largest portion at $231 million (51 percent) of total liabilities.

Expenses by Major Program

The program activities included in the category “Other” are: Secure and Trusted Partnerships, Criminal Investigations, and Recourse.

Revenues by Major Program

For Secure and Trusted Partnerships, the main source of revenue is from registration fees of NEXUS, a joint Canada-U.S. program that simplifies border crossings for pre-approved, low-risk travellers.

For Revenue and Trade Management, the revenues are from various services the Agency provides such as food inspection and other border services, collection of provincial tax and levies, and operation of customs bonded warehouses.

201213 Financial Highlights Charts – Administered Activities

Assets by type

Cash and taxes receivable represent the largest portion at $3,330 million (99.91 percent) of total assets.

Liabilities by type

Amounts payable to other federal government departments and agencies represent the largest portion of liabilities at $266 million (92 percent) of total liabilities.

Revenues: Where Funds Come From

Most of the revenues, $20,338 million (79 percent) were generated from excise taxes on imported goods.

Financial Statements

The CBSA's financial statements are available on the Agency's website at http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/agency-agence/reports-rapports/fs-ef/2013/dpr-rpp-eng.html.

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2012–13 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the CBSA website[ x ].

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations [ xi ] publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

For more information on the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and its activities, please visit the CBSA's website at http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca. Links to other websites of interest are provided below.

 


 

Endnotes