2015–16 Departmental Performance Report - Canada Border Services Agency
Archived - Analysis of Sub-Programs

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Strategic Outcome:

International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Intelligence

Description

The Intelligence Program collects, analyzes and distributes actionable intelligence regarding people, goods, shipments or conveyances bound for or leaving Canada to help the CBSA and other law enforcement partners identify people, goods, shipments or conveyances that may be inadmissible or pose a threat to the security of Canada. CBSA officers located within Canada, at ports of embarkation or at posts abroad assess information collected from a wide range of sources. In addition, the CBSA provides timely, accurate, strategic, operational and tactical intelligence advice to government authorities, like-minded counterpart nations and stakeholders related to threats to national security, including information on terrorism, weapons proliferation, war crimes, organized crime, smuggling, immigration fraud and irregular migration, fraudulent documentation, and border enforcement. Intelligence products such as lookouts, alerts, scientific reports, and threat and risk assessments inform, support and enhance the Agency's screening and targeting capabilities and other CBSA programs (such as Admissibility Determination, Criminal Investigations and Immigration Enforcement). A lookout is reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence on actual or suspected infractions or criminal activities that may result in the interception of inadmissible people. A lookout takes the form of an electronic file record. A lookout "hit" will "flag" or identify particular individuals, including corporations, and specific goods, conveyances or shipments. A lookout "hit" requires a mandatory referral to a secondary examination.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible people Interception rate: Number of CBSA liaison officer interceptions of improperly documented travellers prior to their arrival by air to Canada, measured against improperly documented arrivals to Canada 70.00% 83.00%Sub-Program 1.1.1: Intelligence - Footnote *
Reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible goods, shipments and/or conveyances Ratio of the value of intelligence-led seizures to the value of non-intelligence-led seizures 9:1 15:1Sub-Program 1.1.1: Intelligence - Footnote **

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Targeting

Description

The Targeting Program identifies people and goods bound for Canada that may pose a threat to the security and safety of the country. The CBSA uses a number of automated advance information sources from carriers and importers to identify people, goods and conveyances that may pose a threat to Canada. Advance Passenger Information and Advance Commercial Information provide the CBSA with electronic pre-arrival information on people and goods that can be used to perform risk assessments in advance of their arrival in Canada. Known threats are identified when there is a match against an enforcement database entry. People and goods that are identified as posing a threat to Canada are referred for verification and examination upon their arrival at a port of entry.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Air passengers that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival Average percentage of air passengers targeted for examination that led to a result 25.00% 33.40%
Marine containers and contents that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival Percentage of marine containers targeted for contraband and Food, Plant and Animal (FPA) examination that yielded a result 1.5% 2.40%Sub-Program 1.1.2: Targeting - Footnote *

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Security Screening

Description

The Security Screening Program is responsible for the security screening of foreign nationals who have been referred to the CBSA by a CIC visa officer abroad or in Canada, and who are seeking to come to Canada as a permanent resident, temporary resident (e.g., visitor) or refugee, or are already in Canada and seeking to remain as a temporary or permanent resident.

The CBSA is responsible for ensuring that there are no security concerns related to the individual seeking entry to Canada (e.g., counter-terrorism, counter-espionage, war crimes, crimes against humanity and organized crime) and, based on a thorough screening exercise (including the review of information and intelligence from a wide variety of internal and external sources), makes a recommendation to CIC on the admissibility of the individual. This program is also responsible for determining the admissibility of senior diplomats being posted to Ottawa to ensure that they meet the admissibility requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Persons who may be a national security concern are found to be inadmissible to Canada   Percentage of all negative CBSA recommendations to Citizenship and Immigration relating to Permanent Residents that result in a finding of inadmissibility 95.00% 83.00%Sub-Program 1.1.3: Security Screening - Footnote *
Percentage of all negative CBSA recommendations to Citizenship and Immigration relating to Temporary Residents that result in a finding of inadmissibility 95.00% 99.00%

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Trusted Traveller

Description

The Trusted Traveller Programs are designed to simplify the border clearance process for pre-approved, low-risk travellers entering Canada. The CBSA offers two programs for travellers, NEXUS and CANPASS. These programs streamline (expedite and simplify) border clearance. NEXUS is a joint initiative with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in the air, land and marine modes of transportation, while CANPASS is a Canadian suite of programs for clients entering Canada by plane, corporate and private aircrafts, and private boats. Both programs are available to citizens or permanent residents of Canada and/or the U.S. and enable members to cross the border faster when travelling to Canada and, in the case of NEXUS, when travelling to the U.S.

Applicants to the programs must pass various assessments (e.g., security checks, interviews and risk assessments) specific to the program before being granted membership. NEXUS and CANPASS Air members can use iris recognition technology for passage processing at designated airports, and NEXUS members use Radio Frequency Identification technology for processing at designated highway ports of entry. Members of NEXUS or the CANPASS Private Boat, CANPASS Corporate Aircraft or CANPASS Private Aircraft programs entering Canada by private aircraft, corporate aircraft or private boat must report their arrival in advance and make their declarations to the CBSA Telephone Reporting Centre.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Border clearance is streamlined and expedited Percentage of NEXUS applicants are informed of their success in reaching the interview within 30 business days of receipt of a complete application. 95.00% 100.00%
Trusted travellers are low-risk Percentage of Trusted Traveller members examined who are found to be in compliance with border legislation, regulations and program criteria 97.00% 99.97%

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Trusted Trader

Description

The Trusted Trader Program simplifies many of the border requirements for pre-approved, low-risk participants so that shipments can be processed more quickly and efficiently at the border. Importers approved under the Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) benefit from a streamlined accounting and payment process as well as an expedited clearance option for qualified goods. Members of the Partners in Protection program benefit from enhanced supply chain security as well as lowered examination rates. In addition, members of these Trusted Trader Programs have the option of utilizing the Free and Secure Trade (FAST) lanes to transport eligible imported goods into Canada. FAST is a joint initiative between the CBSA and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

To become a member of the Trusted Trader Programs, applicants must undergo an in-depth risk assessment. Once granted membership, CSA importers can use their own business systems and processes to forward trade data to the CBSA and remit payment of duties and taxes through their own financial institutions. In addition, CSA importers can also apply for trade compliance benefits which allow approved importers the flexibility to completely self-assess and audit their revenue reporting and trade requirements.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Impact of border processing on trusted programs members is minimized Percentage of Trusted Trader shipments examined at border 1.00% 0.30%

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Highway Mode

Description

The Highway Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at 117 designated land ports of entry while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards. Border services officers conduct interviews of persons and drivers of commercial carriers and then make a decision to allow the entry of a person or shipment or refer them for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) and/or examination (e.g., physical search of a vehicle, further investigation of admissibility).

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods, and carriers and exporters are required to report their goods.

Examinations may be performed with the use of specialized tools (e.g., gamma ray imaging Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System, ion scanners and detector dogs) and may include a full or partial offload of the goods to detect the presence of prohibited or restricted goods (e.g., narcotics or weapons). People and/or goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty, seizure or denied entry to Canada.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
People who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at land ports of entry Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at highway portsSub-Program 1.3.1: Highway Mode - Footnote * 4.00% 5.34%
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at a highway port of entry Percentage of people examined at a highway port of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 1.30% 1.75%
Percentage of imported commercial goods examined in the highway mode that result in seizure action 0.02% 0.03%

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Air Mode

Description

The Air Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at designated airports while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Upon arrival, border services officers conduct interviews of persons seeking entry into Canada, aided by electronic pre-arrival risk-assessment information submitted by the airlines. CBSA officers make a decision to admit the person or refer them for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) or examination.

For private and corporate aircraft and general aviation traffic reporting through the Telephone Reporting Centre, various checks are conducted by means of the telephone reporting system. Border services officers make a decision to admit people or refer them for further processing or examination.

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods, and carriers and exporters are required to report their goods. More specifically, air carriers are required to submit electronic pre-arrival information related to their goods for import. Those goods meeting the requirements of border-related legislation are released at the airport or at a designated sufferance warehouse, while those goods identified as being potentially inadmissible are held for an examination.

To assist border services officers in their examinations, detection tools such as detector dogs and ion scanners may be used. People and goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty, seizure or denied entry to Canada.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
People and their goods that are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at air ports of entry Percentage of people examinedSub-Program 1.3.2: Air Mode - Footnote * who are found inadmissible at air ports of entry 3.54% 1.47%Sub-Program 1.3.2: Air Mode - Footnote **
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at airports of entry Percentage of people examinedSub-Program 1.3.2: Air Mode - Footnote * at air ports of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 1.60% 1.19%Sub-Program 1.3.2: Air Mode - Footnote ***
Percentage of imported commercial goods examined in the air mode that result in seizure action 0.07% 0.13%

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Rail Mode

Description

The Rail Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at a rail port of entry or rail yard, while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Rail operators are required to report train, passenger and/or cargo information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers may conduct onboard interviews of travellers seeking entry into Canada upon arrival at the border to determine their admissibility or whether further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) or examination (e.g., physical search of baggage, further investigation of admissibility) is required.

In the commercial stream, border services officers review the electronic information submitted by the rail carrier and the importer/exporter, and make a decision to release the cargo or refer it for an examination at the rail yard.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at rail ports of entry Percentage of people examined at rail ports of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 0.01%Sub-Program 1.3.3: Rail Mode - Footnote * 1.03%
Percentage of imported commercial goods examined that result in seizure action in the rail mode 0.01% 0.00%

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Marine Mode

Description

The Marine Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at a marine port of entry, while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Prior to arrival in the traveller stream, border services officers receive information regarding the passengers and crew aboard cruise ships, ferries, tour boats, private small vessels in the Trusted Traveller Program and commercial vessels. At large cruise ship offices and certain ferry terminals, passengers are processed using Integrated Primary Inspection Line. For those private vessels reporting through the Telephone Reporting Centre, various checks are conducted by means of the telephone reporting system. Border services officers make decisions to admit people or refer them for further processing or examination.

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods. Carriers and exporters are required to report their goods; marine carriers are required to submit advance electronic information for imports and have the option for exports. To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as Remote Operated Vehicles and the Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System are used. In major ports, 100 percent of marine containers are scanned for the presence of radiological material using radiation portals. People and goods that are found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to enforcement action which may include a monetary penalty, seizure, or being denied entry to Canada.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
People who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at marine ports of entry Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at a marine port of entry 2.6% 1.00%Sub-Program 1.3.4: Marine Mode - Footnote *
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at marine ports of entry Percentage of people examined at a marine port of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 1.3% 1.89%
Percentage of imported commercial goods examined at the first point of arrival that result in seizure action in the marine mode 0.13% 0.28%

Sub-Program 1.3.5: Postal

Description

The Postal Program identifies and intercepts international mail items valued at less than Can$2,500 that are inadmissible to Canada while ensuring that admissible mail items are processed within established service standards, and applicable duties and taxes are assessed and collected. Mail items valued at Can$2,500 or higher are processed in the regular commercial import stream.

The Postal Program operates at three CBSA Mail Centres in Canada. Border services officers conduct an inspection of international mail items to determine whether further processing (e.g., assessment and payment of duties and/or taxes) and/or a physical examination is required. Mail items that do not require CBSA intervention are released to Canada Post for delivery.

To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as X-ray and detector dogs may be used. Mail items found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be seized on behalf of other government departments. Importers are advised of their appeal rights, and Canada Post is advised that the item has been taken from the mail stream. All other items that are deemed admissible, after examination, are released to Canada Post for delivery.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Mail that is non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA is intercepted at a Postal centre Percentage of examined international mail items that are seized 2.50% 3.32%

Sub-Program 1.3.6: Courier Low Value Shipment

Description

The Courier Low Value Shipment (LVS) Program identifies and intercepts courier importations that are inadmissible to Canada. The importations, conducted by approved courier participants, enter at designated sufferance warehouses. This provides a streamlined reporting, release and accounting process for most courier importations valued at less than Can$2,500. Mail items valued at Can$2,500 or higher are removed from the Program and processed in the regular commercial process.

To participate in the Courier LVS Program, a courier company must be pre-approved by the CBSA. Prior to the arrival of a courier shipment, the CBSA reviews the electronic information submitted by the courier to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of the Program and applicable legislation and/or if a physical examination is required. If a physical examination is required, the item is presented to a border services officer upon arrival. To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as targets and detector dogs may be used. Goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty or seizure.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Courier shipments that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted Percentage of courier shipments examined that are seized 0.25% 0.14%Sub-Program 1.3.6: Courier Low Value Shipment - Footnote *
Percentage of courier shipments examined that are removed from the Courier Low Value Shipment Program and transferred to the regular import stream because the goods were prohibited, restricted, controlled or non-compliant 7.00% 6.18%Sub-Program 1.3.6: Courier Low Value Shipment - Footnote **

Sub-Program 1.5.1: Immigration Investigation

Description

The Immigration Investigations Program investigates, reports and arrests foreign nationals and permanent residents already in Canada who are or may be inadmissible to Canada as defined by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Investigation techniques can include data analysis of information collected regarding an individual's immigration application, physical surveillance to locate fugitive inadmissible persons, and field searches of residences and belongings for evidence. Depending on the type of inadmissibility and the status of the person in question, inadmissibility reports are reviewed by either a Minister's Delegate or the IRB. When a person fails to appear for an immigration proceeding such as an examination, admissibility hearing or removal interview, a warrant for their arrest may be issued. Warrants may also be issued against a foreign national or permanent resident where a CBSA inland enforcement officer has reasonable grounds to believe that they are inadmissible to Canada.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Immigration investigations are conducted against foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada Percentage of immigration investigations initiated that result in a person being identified as inadmissible to Canada 55.00% 60.00%
Percentage of immigration warrants executed/cancelled as a result of active investigation activities conducted by the CBSA 90.00% 95.00%
Timely investigation of foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada Percentage of immigration investigations finalized within one year of being initiated 95.00% 88.00%Sub-Program 1.5.1: Immigration Investigation - Footnote *

Sub-Program 1.5.2: Detentions

Description

The Detentions Program detains and/or monitors the conditions of release of foreign nationals or permanent residents where there are reasonable grounds to believe the individual is inadmissible to Canada and where the individual is a danger to the public, poses a flight risk or where their identity is not established. Foreign nationals and permanent residents may also be detained upon entry into Canada for an examination or where the individual is suspected of being inadmissible for security reasons. They are entitled to an IRB hearing after being detained for 48 hours, 7 days and 30 days. The CBSA has three immigration holding centres in Canada located at Vancouver, Toronto and Montréal.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Foreign nationals and permanent residents that may pose a risk to the safety and security of Canada are detained Percentage of foreign nationals and permanent residents who may be inadmissible to Canada or who may be ready for removal who are detained according to their assessed level of risk 85.00% 83.00%Sub-Program 1.5.2: Detentions - Footnote *

Sub-Program 1.5.3: Immigration Hearings

Description

The Immigration Hearings Program ensures that the Government of Canada's interests are represented at immigration proceedings before the IRB of Canada which determines the immigration and detention status of foreign nationals and permanent residents already in Canada, in accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. CBSA hearings officers are responsible for representing the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of CIC at immigration proceedings before the IRB. This function ensures that foreign nationals and permanent residents who are inadmissible to Canada are denied status, and removal orders are issued where appropriate.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The position of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of CIC with respect to immigration status is represented and upheld at administrative proceedings before the IRB Percentage of decisions rendered by Members of the IRB and outcomes that align with the priorities of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of CIC 70.00% 75.00%

Sub-Program 1.5.4: Removals

Description

The Removals Program ensures that foreign nationals and permanent residents with an enforceable removal order are removed from Canada. Once a person is removal-ready, an interview is conducted to ensure that a travel document is available and that a pre-removal risk assessment is offered by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Where a valid travel document is not available, CBSA inland enforcement officers liaise with foreign embassies to secure the required travel documents. The CBSA may have to make further arrangements for removal, which could include arranging for travel (e.g., purchasing an airline ticket or chartering a plane for high-risk individuals in exceptional cases), providing escorts (e.g., to respond to airline and transit country requirements), and liaising with CBSA staff abroad (migration integrity officers) to ensure smooth passage from Canada to the final destination.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Timely removal of foreign nationals subject to an enforceable removal order Average number of days to facilitate a removal of a failed claimant from Canada pre-Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act (PCISA) 650 1,708Sub-Program 1.5.4: Removals - Footnote *
Average number of days to facilitate a removal of a failed claimant from Canada post-Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act (PCISA) 365 125

Sub-Program 1.7.1: Anti-Dumping and Countervailing

Description

The Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Program is responsible for the administration of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA). Its role is to provide assistance to Canadian producers who face unfair foreign competition from dumped or subsidized goods in the Canadian marketplace. SIMA provides measures of redress against such goods when they have caused injury to the Canadian industry, and is in keeping with Canada's international obligations as a signatory to the World Trade Organization. Protecting Canadian industry against the injury from dumped or subsidized imports requires a two-track approach, with the CBSA responsible for determining whether imports are being dumped or subsidized, and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal making the decision of whether these imports have caused injury to Canadian production.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance IndicatorsSub-Program 1.7.1: Anti-Dumping and Countervailing - Footnote * Targets Actual Results
Canadian industry is protected from economic injury caused by the subsidizing and dumping of imported goods Number of Canadian jobs protected as a result of applying the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA) 33,000 36,787
Value of Canadian production protected as the result of applying SIMA $7 billion $8.26 billion

Sub-Program 1.7.2: Trade Policy

Description

The Trade Policy Program is responsible for interpreting the legislation and regulations that govern the tariff classification, origin and value of imported goods, and the related assessment of duties and taxes, so as to ensure that persons engaged in the importation of goods into Canada fully understand all of the trade-related requirements in order to promote self-compliance. The Program also administers Canada's trade incentive initiatives (e.g., duties deferral, customs warehouses, remissions, and drawbacks) which assist Canadian businesses in remaining competitive in international markets. Further, the Program is responsible for the negotiation of the origin procedures that are included in all of Canada's free trade agreements, which serve to strengthen international trade rules and open new markets for Canadians. Finally, the program is responsible for representing the views of Canadian businesses in international trade fora, such as the World Customs Organization and the World Trade Organization, in order to ensure a fair and accessible global trading environment.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Importers have access to interpretations, rulings, advice and guidance on trade-related issues Percentage of trade-related policies reviewed and revised, as required 20.00% 30.00%
Percentage of advance rulings released within 120 calendar days of receipt of full information 95.00% 70.00%Sub-Program 1.7.2: Trade Policy - Footnote *

Sub-Program 1.7.3: Trade Compliance

Description

The Trade Compliance Program works to ensure that Canadian importers accurately account for the commercial goods that they bring into Canada and pay all of the duties and taxes owing. Compliance activities include random verifications, selected using a statistical model, that are used to measure the rate of compliance by product type and/or industry. The results also provide valuable information that often lead to more focused, risk-based verifications in instances where non-compliance is suspected. These trade compliance activities are supported by robust monitoring and administrative penalty programs that are aimed at maintaining a level playing field for all Canadian importers by making certain that the rules apply equally to everyone and that the appropriate duties and taxes are paid in full.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Importers are in compliance with Canadian trade laws Percentage of revenue-based, targeted compliance verifications that yield a positive result for the CBSA (i.e., $1000 or more owing to the Government of Canada) 65.00% 43.00%Sub-Program 1.7.3: Trade Compliance - Footnote *
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