ARCHIVED - PART III – Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP)

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Table of Contents

ISSN 2292-5384

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The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

2014-15 Estimates

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I - Government Expenditure Plan - provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II - Main Estimates - supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III - Departmental Expenditure Plans - consists of two components:

  • Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)
  • Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat website.Footnote i

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1st (See Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests – from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PAC - Report 15Footnote ii), in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGO - Report 7Footnote iii), in 2012 – to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

  • In Section II, financial, human resources and performance information is now presented at the Program and Sub-program levels for more granularity.
  • The report’s general format and terminology have been reviewed for clarity and consistency purposes.
  • Other efforts aimed at making the report more intuitive and focused on Estimates information were made to strengthen alignment with the Main Estimates.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization’s purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d’être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome(s)

This Section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, Programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled “Planning Highlights”. This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department’s strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In  this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary Vs. Non-budgetary Expenditures
Budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to crown corporations. Non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Expected Result
An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.
Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada Outcomes
A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.
Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)
A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.

An MRRS provides detailed information on all departmental programs (e.g.: program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government’s priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.
Planned Spending
For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a Treasury Board (TB) submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include  amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014-15 Main Estimates.
Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results, and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of a department’s programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Spending Areas
Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areasFootnote iv (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs) each comprised of three to five Government of Canada outcomes.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the department's mandate, vision, and core functions.
Sunset Program
A time-limited program that does not have on-going funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration).
Whole-of-Government Framework
A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their Programs to a set of high level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.

Minister’s Message

Minister pictureAs Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, it is my pleasure to present to Parliament the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

Every day, CBSA officers help ensure that Canada’s border is both safe and effective. They prevent guns, drugs, illegal immigrants and terrorists from entering the country.  But they also work with business to ensure the smooth movement of travel and trade. CBSA officers deal daily with over 275,000 law-abiding travellers, and nearly $1.5 billion of commercial goods.

For 10 years now, the CBSA has been on the front lines of Canada’s fight for security and has helped ensure our prosperity. In that time, it has evolved into a fully integrated border services organization that strives for continuous improvement in all facets of border management. 

As the Minister responsible for the CBSA, I am proud of the work done by the men and women of the CBSA and I look forward to another year of excellent service.

The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Steven Blaney, P.C., M.P.

Deputy Head: Mr. Luc Portelance

Ministerial portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Year established: 2003

Main legislative authorities: Canada Border Services Agency Act; Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border.

Responsibilities

The CBSA is an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which is responsible for integrated national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border management operations. Specific responsibilities include the following:

  • administering legislation that governs the admissibility of people and goods into and out of Canada;
  • identifying, detaining, and removing people who are inadmissible to Canada;
  • interdicting illegal goods at Canada’s border;
  • protecting food safety, plant and animal health, and Canada’s resource base;
  • administering trade legislation and agreements, including the enforcement of trade remedies that protect Canadian industry;
  • administering a fair and impartial redress mechanism; and
  • collecting duties and taxes on imported goods.

Examples of Acts
Administered by the CBSA

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canada Border Services Agency Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Customs Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Food and Drugs Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Special Import Measures Act

CBSA Service Locations
 

The CBSA provides services at multiple points across Canada and abroad, including the following:

  • 117 land border crossings
  • 73 sufferance warehouses
  • 27 rail offices
  • 225 airports
  • 439 marine reporting sites
  • 12 ferry terminals
  • 10 cruise ship operations
  • 218 commercial vessel clearance facilities
  • 3 mail processing centres
  • 48 international offices

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

1. Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks

  • 1.1 Program: Risk Assessment
    • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Intelligence
    • 1.1.2 Sub-program:  Targeting
    • 1.1.3 Sub-program:  Security Screening
  • 1.2 Program: Secure and Trusted Partnerships
    • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Trusted Traveller
    • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Trusted Trader
  • 1.3 Program: Admissibility Determination
    • 1.3.1 Sub-program:  Highway Mode
    • 1.3.2 Sub-program:  Air Mode
    • 1.3.3 Sub-program:  Rail Mode
    • 1.3.4 Sub-program:  Marine Mode
    • 1.3.5 Sub-program:  Postal
    • 1.3.6 Sub-program:  Courier Low Value Shipment
  • 1.4 Program: Criminal Investigations
  • 1.5 Program: Immigration Enforcement
    • 1.5.1 Sub-program:  Immigration Investigation
    • 1.5.2 Sub-program:  Detentions
    • 1.5.3 Sub-program:  Immigration Hearings
    • 1.5.4 Sub-program:  Removals
  • 1.6 Program: Recourse
  • 1.7 Program: Revenue and Trade Management
    • 1.7.1 Sub-program:  Anti-dumping and Countervailing
    • 1.7.2 Sub-program:  Trade Policy
    • 1.7.3 Sub-program:  Trade Compliance
  • Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority

Secure the Border Strategically

Type

New

Programs

Risk Assessment
Secure and Trusted Partnerships
Admissibility Determination
Criminal Investigations
Immigration Enforcement

Description

Why is this a priority?

The timely use of high-quality information coupled with fully implementing an integrated approach to the management of border-related risks to enable better enforcement results are key for the Agency’s success in protecting Canada’s population throughout the border continuum. This approach to border management has allowed the CBSA to effectively partner with its United States (U.S.) counterparts through Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives to further strengthen border security, promote economic competitiveness and facilitate the movement of low-risk travellers and goods.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The CBSA will continue to enhance its ability to risk assess, determine admissibility, investigate criminal activities, and enforce immigration. To ensure that the border remains strategically secured for both the traveller and commercial streams, the CBSA will continue to implement the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Strengthening the Agency’s ability to intercept inadmissible people by continuing to modernize the tasks it uses to manage risks away from the border will include the following highlights:

  • A common approach to screening travellers prior to their departure to Canada will be used and Advance Passenger Information/Passenger Name Record (API/PNR) compliance and data quality will be improved.
  • The integration of the CBSA’s intelligence, criminal investigations, and inland enforcement responsibilities will be enhanced to leverage commonalities and improve decision making to achieve greater efficiency, effectiveness and results.
  • The CBSA will constantly monitor and assess the effectiveness and impact of Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, including initiatives that support the Government of Canada’s reform of the refugee determination system.

Through the commercial business stream, the Agency will maintain its high operational standards while striving to build upon a solid commitment to improve facilitation without compromising security. In doing so, the CBSA will continue to capitalize on existing partnerships to improve the facilitation of goods across the border for Canadians and stakeholders while employing effective tools to determine admissibility.

The complexity and broad scope of the Agency’s mandate often require solutions that touch upon both commercial and traveller streams. In responding to this organizational reality, the Agency will:

  • Continue the implementation of the National Targeting Business Model.
  • Continue to support finalization of a new agreement with the U.S. to cover land, marine and rail pre-clearance.
  • Continue to implement the Advance Commercial Information (ACI) requirements for cargo, conveyance, crew, and importer advance trade data to facilitate the risk assessment of shipments before arrival in Canada (eManifest).

Priority

Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

Type

New

Programs

Risk Assessment
Secure and Trusted Partnerships
Admissibility Determination
Recourse
Revenue and Trade Management

Description

Why is this a priority?

The CBSA remains committed to strengthening the Agency’s ability to minimize delays for low-risk travellers and goods while optimizing measures to intercept inadmissible goods and people in all modes of travel. By leveraging modern technology and smart information processes, the CBSA will continue to efficiently manage increasing traveller and commercial volumes, as well as improve service for Canadians.


What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The CBSA will enhance the benefits of trusted programs that help trusted businesses and travellers move efficiently across the border.

In addition, the CBSA will continue to strive for client service excellence through the following:

  • Jointly plan investments and enhance client service along the Canada–U.S. border under the Beyond the Border Action Plan.
  • Continue the expansion of Automated Border Clearance to facilitate the entry of returning Canadian Citizens.
  • Continue to modernize and optimize systems and processes that support the assessment and collection of importer revenues, and reporting on revenue information and trade data, under the CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM) project.
  • Ensure that Canadian importers have ready access to information about Canada’s trade legislation, regulations and policies in order to promote self-compliance.
  • Implement the Recourse Modernization Initiative (RMI) to ensure the Agency’s recourse functions are streamlined and have a focus on client service.

Working internationally remains important in continuing the development and implementation of regulations and systems to meet World Customs Organization and the World Trade Organization standards as well as the commitments made under the Beyond the Border Action Plan for Low Value Shipments.

Priority

Advance Global Border Management

Type

New

Programs

Risk Assessment
Secure and Trusted Partnerships
Revenue and Trade Management

Description

Why is this a priority?

International trade growth and global migration are best dealt with by leveraging solid relationships with key international partners. Through bilateral relations and engagement through multilateral fora, the CBSA will exchange information and intelligence, align processes to achieve greater efficiencies, mutual goals, objectives, and capitalize on opportunities to exchange and implement best practices,  as well as conducting capacity-building projects with partner countries.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The CBSA will focus efforts beyond Canadian borders by:

  • Building and maintaining effective international partnerships through theCBSA’s International Network.
  • Strengthening international relationships with border management agencies, administrations and organizations to promote facilitation and security for trade and travel.
  • Supporting the Government of Canada's free trade negotiations.

Priority

Strengthen Organizational Resilience

Type

New

Programs

Internal Services

Description

Why is this a priority?

A motivated, knowledgeable and innovative workforce is crucial at the CBSA to provide excellent frontline service delivery. The CBSA will continue to strengthen its organizational resilience in order to deliver on its mandate in a timely basis and maintain the confidence of Canadians and stakeholders.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

The Agency will continue to strive for:

  • Well-designed and agile business – Employing efficient and effective business models that align with strategic priorities and available resources to achieve Agency goals.
  • Frontline service delivery – Entrenching service excellence across the spectrum of border services provided by the Agency.
  • Modern, responsive and enabling infrastructure – Maintaining modern technologies, information systems and physical assets to increase productivity and improve decision making.
  • Employee excellence – Ensuring a motivated, knowledgeable and innovative workforce that continually improves border integrity and security.

In 2013, the Agency successfully completed its Change Agenda Initiative: a four-year plan to modernize enterprise management and improve program delivery. Mindful of changing business requirements, the CBSA’s senior management reset the Agency’s strategic priorities. Ensuring alignment with Government of Canada priorities, an Agency-wide internal process was launched and a revised set of four strategic priorities was established:

  • To secure the border strategically;
  • To streamline and simplify the border experience;
  • To advance global border management;
  • To strengthen organizational resilience.

Building upon the three strategic priorities that have guided Agency business since fiscal year 2011-12: 1) Implement the Beyond the Border Agreement with the United States; 2) Modernize the Agency's business; and 3) Implement the Change Agenda, these strengthened strategic priorities will allow the Agency to maintain its high operational standards. The major initiatives that fell under the former strategic priorities such as eManifest, Entry-Exit, CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM), and Postal Modernization, will all continue under the new strategic priorities.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks

The Agency works to achieve its strategic outcome in a complex and dynamic operating environment, driven largely by factors beyond its control. Current global economic rebalancing, international trade, human migration, dynamic travel patterns, advancements in information technology, and changing workforce entail risks to which the CBSA will be responding in the coming years. Integrating risk management practices allow the CBSA to achieve its priorities to secure the border strategically, streamline and simplify the border experience, and advance global border management.

The CBSA faces various risks, many of which remain present from year to year, in pursuing its strategic outcome. However, variances in risk exposure levels can be observed due to changes in the nature of the risk drivers as well as efforts made to strengthen or add control. The table below identifies three of the Agency’s top risks, as evaluated by senior management and found in the CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile: the Agency’s overarching, enterprise-level risk document. The risk response strategies presented include activities that are ongoing or planned for 2014–15 to help mitigate these risks.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to PAA*

Contraband

The risk that commercial quantities of contraband will enter or transit Canada.

  • Passenger information system enhancements and scenario-based targeting: A three-step phased approach to enhance targeting scenarios through system and program improvements.
  • Advance information compliance monitoring and data quality improvements: Multiple activities ongoing to systematically monitor Advance Commercial Information and Advance Passenger Information / Passenger Name Record to develop strategies to improve compliance.
  • Postal Modernization Initiative: The implementation of a postal risk assessment framework to allow for pre-arrival data to be risk assessed; improved process flows; and enhanced application of detection technology.
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination

Terrorist Activities

The risk that individuals/groups with links to terrorism, or materials to support terrorist activities, will enter, exit, or transit Canada.

  • Passenger information system enhancements and scenario-based targeting: A three-step phased approach to enhance targeting scenarios through system and program improvements.
  • Risk rules and indicators for commercial goods: Increased flexibility to input, refine or remove targeting indicators for commercial goods.
  • Advance information compliance monitoring and data quality improvements: Multiple activities ongoing to systematically monitor Advance Commercial Information and Advance Passenger Information / Passenger Name Record to develop strategies to improve compliance.
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination

IT Systems

The risk that IT systems will not enable current and future business activities.

  • Continue to support and implement Beyond the Border Action Plan technology projects.
  • Continue the decommissioning of aging and legacy business applications, including the replacement of aging revenue and cash management systems under CARM.
  • Leverage alternate forms of service delivery and third-party fully managed service delivery for services that can be better managed outside the Agency.
  • Internal Services
* Some risks are linked to additional programs of the Program Alignment Architecture. This table identifies the programs with the greatest linkages to the risk.
Descriptions of Key Risks:
Contraband:
Over the past two decades, cross-border organized crime such as drug trafficking, currency trafficking and the illegal movement of firearms, tobacco and vehicles has become increasingly sophisticated and presents enforcement complexity as it reaches beyond national jurisdictions. Ongoing collaboration with law enforcement partners, the use of automated targeting systems, and the work accomplished by a variety of enforcement teams are examples of controls in place to help reduce the Contraband risk. However, the fact that the number and quantity of drug seizures has been climbing in recent years has led to the determination that the level of exposure to the contraband risk has increased from previous years.
Terrorist Activities:
Terrorism is recognized as a national security threat to Canada. Canada has been identified as a target by certain extremist groups and it is home to sympathizers and affiliates of trans-national terrorist entities. The existence of ‘insider threats' has been identified as an emerging national security trend. The overseas detection work of CBSA liaision officers, heightened screening of CBSA personnel, as well as improved targeting capacity as a result of the implementation of the National Targeting Centre are a few of the current controls that contribute to mitigating the Terrorist Activities risk. However, there is a need for continued vigilance as the occurrence of a terrorist act either in or associated with Canada would have major repercussions.
IT Systems:
The CBSA’s business is increasingly dependent on the use of various forms of technology. To keep pace with evolving business needs and technology, the Agency requires planned and ongoing investments in systems and tools. As such, the Agency continues to invest with its service provision partners to ensure current and future business activities are supported on a 24/7 basis.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
1,736,391,109 1,736,391,109 1,654,565,664 1,556,684,904

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents—FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
13,751 13,600 13,421

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Program(s) (dollars)

Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks

Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2011-12
Expenditures
2012-13
Expenditures
2013-14
Forecast Spending
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
Risk Assessment 117,258,228 121,511,557 118,505,011 155,301,134 155,301,134 140,296,656 140,608,297
Secure and Trusted Partnerships 33,246,592 31,564,355 37,789,844 42,062,245 42,062,245 41,432,038 40,635,411
Admissibility Determination 582,713,148 586,293,558 700,470,363 681,725,979 681,725,979 647,713,847 594,877,995
Criminal Investigations 27,184,823 26,441,935 30,818,340 23,391,775 23,391,775 23,391,775 23,391,775
Immigration Enforcement 150,516,396 150,469,520 166,982,682 164,911,279 164,911,279 158,549,531 138,751,772
Recourse 12,674,105 11,118,094 11,723,366 9,832,518 9,832,518 9,832,518 9,832,518
Revenue and Trade Management 75,965,178 73,463,331 82,036,107 73,918,165 73,918,165 69,117,374 66,928,881
Strategic Outcome Subtotal 999,558,470 1,000,862,350 1,148,325,713 1,151,143,095 1,151,143,095 1,090,333,739 1,015,026,649
Internal Services Subtotal 835,738,480 706,493,658 769,401,557 585,248,014 585,248,014 564,231,925 541,658,255
Total 1,835,296,950 1,707,356,008 1,917,727,270 1,736,391,109 1,736,391,109 1,654,565,664 1,556,684,904

The 2013–14 forecasted spending is higher than the 2013–14 Main Estimates of $1,680 million due to additional funding received during the year through supplementary estimates for delivering the Beyond the Border Action Plan. The planned spending from 2014–15 to 2016–17 does not reflect any supplementary funding and carry forward adjustments.

The 2014–15 Main Estimates of $1,736 million represents an increase of $56 million or 3% from the 2013–14 Main Estimates, mainly as a result of new initiatives under the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

In 2015–16, the planned spending will decrease by $81.8 million compared with the previous year. The major contributing factors for this decrease are the completion of the eManifest project ($31.3 million) and Postal Modernization ($7.1 million). In addition, the project definition phase for the CARM project will be completed resulting in a reduction of funding in 2015–16 ($12.7 million). The reduction is also attributable to the Agency delivering on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan. In particular, the Integrated Cargo Security Initiative ($15.1 million) will have completed the marine container examination facility in Vancouver. The Entry/Exit Initiative ($8.9 million) will have implemented the Entry/Exit information systems to facilitate the exchange of data between Canada and the U.S. 

The planned spending in 2016–17 decreases by $97.9 million compared to 2015–16. A large portion of the reduction is attributed to the following items: Arming of Border Services Officers ($49.8 million), Refugee Reform ($10.3 million), 2015 Pan and Parapan American Games ($4.6 million), and activities associated with cessation and vacation of refugee claims related to Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act ($4.5 million). The reduction is also attributable to the Agency delivering on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan by 2015–16. Efficiency gains due to the implementation of Postal Modernization will return $5.2 million to the consolidated revenue fund.

The CBSA has completed a review of its FTE, budget allocation and expenditures for Internal services. The preliminary findings demonstrate that some expenditures reported under Internal services should be budgeted and charged to other program activities. Adjustments to Estimates documents will be made in the future to reflect the findings. Noticeable changes will be seen in the 2013–14 Departmental Performance Report, while the planned spending by Program will be updated as part of the 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities and 2015–16 Main Estimates.

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014-15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area Footnote v (dollars)

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada
Outcome
2014-15
Planned
Spending









International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks
Risk Assessment International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 155,301,134
Secure and Trusted Partnerships International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 42,062,245
Admissibility Determination Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 681,725,979
Criminal Investigations Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 23,391,775
Immigration Enforcement Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 164,911,279
Recourse Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 9,832,518
Revenue and Trade Management Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace 73,918,165

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 83,750,683
Social Affairs 870,029,033
International Affairs 197,363,379
Government Affairs -

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

department spending clip

The CBSA total actual spending has decreased from $1,835 million in 2011–2012 to $1,707 million in 2012–13. This decrease is mainly attributed to the CBSA’s contribution to the Government of Canada’s commitment in Budget 2011 to deliver a balanced budget, as well as reduced spending as a result of the creation of Shared Services Canada.

The CBSA increase in spending from 2012–13 to 2013–14 is mainly due to the delivery on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This Plan establishes a new long-term partnership built upon a perimeter approach to security and economic competitiveness with the U.S. The CBSA has also increased its forecasted spending to account for collective agreement impacts for the tentative agreement signed between Treasury Board and the Public Service Alliance of Canada for the Border Services Group.

The CBSA planned spending will decrease beginning in 2014–15 and following years mainly due to the planned reduction in funding requirements for initiatives included in the Beyond the Border Action Plan. The CBSA will continue to undertake its transformation agenda and focus on improving effectiveness and funding efficiencies to be more agile in responding to the changing economic climate.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CBSA’s organizational appropriations, please see the 2014-15 Main Estimates publicationFootnote vi

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)

The 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS)Footnote vii, tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013–16 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act.

The CBSA contributes to Theme III - Protecting Nature and Canadians, and Theme IV - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government as denoted by the visual identifiers below. These contributions are components of the following programs and sub-programs and are further explained in Section II:

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THEME

PROGRAM ACTIVITY

SUB-PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

Theme3small_enTheme III: Protecting Nature Admissibility Determination
  • Highway Mode
  • Air Mode
  • Rail Mode
  • Marine Mode
Theme4small_enTheme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government Internal Services
  • Resource Management Services
  • Asset Management Services

The CBSA also ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

For additional details on the CBSA’s activities to support sustainable development, please see Section II of this RPP and the Agency’s Sustainable Development Strategy 2014–2017Footnote viii.For complete details on the federal strategy, please see Environment Canada’s sustainable developmentFootnote ix website.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks.

Program 1.1: Risk Assessment

Description

The Risk Assessment Program “pushes the border out” by seeking to identify high-risk people, goods and conveyances as early as possible in the travel and trade continuum to prevent inadmissible people and goods from entering Canada. This benefits the travelling public and the trade community by enabling the Agency to focus its examination and interdiction activities on high-risk people and goods, thereby facilitating the entry of low-risk travellers and goods. The Agency uses automated risk assessment systems and intelligence to identify potential risks to the security and safety of people and goods.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
155,301,134 155,301,134 140,296,656 140,608,297

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
1,084 1,073 1,076

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Potential threats to the safety and security of Canada, such as inadmissible goods and people, are identified, assessed and intercepted prior to arrival Percentage of threats that led to an enforcement action or admissibility recommendation 18% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to modernize the tools it uses to manage risks away from the border

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

The Agency will continue to prioritize intelligence and targeting activities that prevent high-risk goods and people from gaining access to Canada. Key initiatives such as Interactive Advance Passenger Information under the Beyond the Border Action Plan and the risk assessment of shipments under the eManifest initiative will be progressing in 2014-15. In addition, renewal of intelligence tools available to frontline decision makers will be undertaken as part of the continued improvement of the lookouts system.

Sub-program 1.1.1: Intelligence

Description:

The Intelligence Program collects, analyzes and distributes actionable intelligence regarding people, goods, shipments or conveyances bound for or leaving Canada to help the CBSA and other law enforcement partners identify people, goods, shipments or conveyances that may be inadmissible or pose a threat to the security of Canada. CBSA officers located within Canada, at ports of embarkation or at posts abroad assess information collected from a wide range of sources. In addition, the CBSA provides timely, accurate, strategic, operational and tactical intelligence advice to government authorities, like-minded counterpart nations and stakeholders related to threats to national security, including information on terrorism, weapons proliferation, war crimes, organized crime, smuggling, immigration fraud and irregular migration, fraudulent documentation, and border enforcement. Intelligence products such as lookouts, alerts, scientific reports, and threat and risk assessments inform, support and enhance the Agency’s screening and targeting capabilities and other CBSA programs (such as Admissibility Determination, Criminal Investigations and Immigration Enforcement). A lookout is reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence on actual or suspected infractions or criminal activities that may result in the interception of inadmissible people. A lookout takes the form of an electronic file record. A lookout “hit” will “flag” or identify particular individuals, including corporations, and specific goods, conveyances or shipments. A lookout “hit” requires a mandatory referral to a secondary examination.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
47,192,754 47,412,160 46,694,383

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
480 483 475

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible people Interception Rate (number of CBSA liaison officer interceptions of improperly documented travellers prior to their arrival by air to Canada, measured against improperly documented arrivals to Canada 70% 03/2015
Reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible goods, shipments and/or conveyances The percentage increase in value of intelligence-led seizures compared to non-intelligence-led seizures 400% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to support CBSA decision making through closer collaboration with Criminal Investigations and Immigration Enforcement in order to produce timely intelligence that enables the Agency to secure the border strategically

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15, the Agency will continue to address process and systems challenges that may be impeding the effective and timely dissemination of intelligence internally, and to external client stakeholders, such as Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and other law enforcement agencies.

In parallel, the CBSA will continue to improve its performance measurement framework for the intelligence program in order to better monitor intelligence-led enforcement outcomes and ensure that intelligence activities are measurable and aligned to address the Agency’s key border enforcement priorities.

Key Commitment: Build and maintain effective international partnerships through the CBSA’s International Network

Related Organizational Priority: Advance Global Border Management

The Agency must engage extensively with the international community, both at the bilateral and multilateral levels. A productive relationship with international counterparts allows the Agency to address shared issues, exchange information and best practices, and accomplish mutual goals and objectives. A key component of the CBSA’s international engagement strategy is the International Network. The CBSA International Network has a significant presence worldwide with officers and executive-level counsellors serving in missions strategically located around the world. The CBSA liaison officers’ role has been expanded to better reflect the Agency’s full mandate as it relates to border-related threats, national security, human smuggling prevention, contraband detection, supply chain security and food, plant and animal safety. Maintaining an effective international operational capacity is essential to the Agency’s border management approach based on threat mitigation, and implementation of guiding principles of the Agency’s Border Modernization agenda of Pushing the Border Out and Facilitating Low Risk.

To continue to build and maintain effective international partnerships, the Agency will, in 2014−15, undertake a number of activities. The Agency will strengthen the logistical support for the International Network and use the Network to address border threats early through engagement with foreign partners, airlines and commercial shippers. The Agency will evolve the liaison officers network to better reflect the Agency’s full mandate and use the executive-level counsellors to advance the Agency’s strategic goals with key international partners. The Agency will also undertake a review of the Liaison Officers Management Framework with CIC. Finally, the CBSA will ensure that resources, plans and procedures are in place to respond to international crisis situations.

Sub-program 1.1.2: Targeting

Description:

The Targeting Program identifies people and goods bound for Canada that may pose a threat to the security and safety of the country. The CBSA uses a number of automated advance information sources from carriers and importers to identify people, goods and conveyances that may pose a threat to Canada. Advance Passenger Information and Advance Commercial Information provide the CBSA with electronic pre-arrival information on people and goods that can be used to perform risk assessments in advance of their arrival in Canada. Known threats are identified when there is a match against an enforcement database entry. People and goods that are identified as posing a threat to Canada are referred for verification and examination upon their arrival at a port of entry.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
86,772,458 73,617,825 74,649,652
* The decrease in planned spending from 2014−15 to 2015−16 is mainly due to the completion of the eManifest project.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
409 416 427

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Air passengers that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival Average percentage of air passengers targeted for examination that led to a result 25% 03/2015
Marine containers and contents that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival Percentage of marine containers targeted for contraband and Food, Plant and Animal (FPA) examination that yielded a result 1% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance the screening of travellers prior to their departure for Canada by using a common approach

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15, the CBSA will continue to enhance its traveller targeting program. The coming into force of the Agreement Between Canada and the European Union on the Transfer and Processing of Passenger Name Record Data means Canada will now receive advance information prior to a flight’s departure for Canada. This supports the Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) project, a key Beyond the Border Action Plan initiative. IAPI will expand the existing API/PNR program by collecting passenger information earlier in the traveller continuum. This will allow the CBSA to effectively screen and issue board/no-board messages for all travellers and crew members flying to Canada prior to departure.

In 2014−15, the Agency will continue to enhance advance passenger information systems including the development and implementation of an enhanced scenario-based passenger targeting methodology to more effectively identify high-risk travellers prior to their arrival in Canada. This methodology will be consistent with that of the U.S. and with existing bilateral information-sharing agreements. These activities are also part of the risk response strategies linked to the Contraband and Terrorist Activities risks and align with the CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile.

In addition, as part of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, the Entry/Exit Initiative will incorporate advance exit information as part of a multi-phased approach to improve information sharing with other federal departments on travellers leaving Canada, including expanding the sharing of passage history information with the U.S. for the specific purposes of immigration, law enforcement, and national security.

Finally, in 2014−15, the Agency’s Passenger Information System (PAXIS) will be redesigned to better enable targeting officers to review the risk of travellers using API/PNR data prior to arriving at one of Canada's international airports. The CBSA will also support the new targeting service delivery model, enhance the targeting reporting functionality, and improve its enforcement systems.

Key Commitment: Continue to implement Advance Commercial Information (ACI) requirements for cargo, conveyance, crew, and importer advance trade data to facilitate the risk assessment of shipments before arrival in Canada (eManifest)

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

eManifest is a transformational initiative that aims to modernize and improve cross-border commercial processes by supporting the CBSA’s ability to improve the security of supply chains and reduce barriers to trade. The eManifest initiative entails the collection and risk assessment of ACI to allow the Agency to target high risks as early as possible in the supply chain continuum; offer expedited border processing for commercial goods determined to be low risk; and improve the consistency and predictability of service delivery to traders and stakeholders.

In 2014−15, regulations are expected to come into force, making it mandatory for highway and rail carriers to transmit ACI prior to the conveyances arriving in Canada.

In 2014−15, regulations are also expected to come into force, which build upon existing ACI program requirements by making it mandatory for marine carriers to submit additional information pertaining to containerized cargo to the CBSA through eManifest. This will strengthen the targeting of marine containers and contents that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada prior to their arrival. A multiplicity of data sources from carriers, freight forwarders, and importers will serve to both enable security screening for commercial goods, as well as exposing any containers which have not been reported.

In 2014−15, the CBSA will continue to gradually upgrade and modernize its electronic systems, which enable importers to transmit advance trade data, and carriers in all modes of transport to transmit multi-modal pre-load/pre-arrival cargo data. The CBSA will implement a new risk assessment methodology to improve the secure flow of trade.

Key Commitment: Continue the implementation of the Targeting Business Model

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

The CBSA significantly advanced the implementation of its Targeting Business Model by fully transitioning air cargo, air passenger and marine cargo targeting activities to the National Targeting Centre in 2012−13. In addition, the National Targeting Program was established, the National Targeting Policy was finalized and a national standardized training framework was designed and implemented. The Agency enhanced its reporting and performance measurement framework to strengthen management of the targeting program as a result.

In 2014−15, the Agency will complete the implementation of its Targeting Business Model by centralizing the remaining targeting activities to the National Targeting Centre including marine (cruise ship) passenger targeting.

Key Commitment: Improve API/PNR Compliance and Data Quality

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

To strengthen the CBSA’s ability to undertake pre-arrival risk assessment (targeting) of travellers, the Agency is currently implementing a comprehensive action plan to improve the quality of Advance Passenger Information and Passenger Name Record data being provided by international carriers. This plan will be fully implemented by June 2014. It will provide strengthened direction to airlines on collecting and providing API and PNR data, and will provide airlines with a regular report on their performance in terms of compliance and data quality. In addition, as part of the Beyond the Border Action Plan, the CBSA will implement an automated monitoring system enabling it to quickly identify issues with the quality of all incoming data. The requirement for this work was identified in the Auditor General’s Report of Fall 2013.

Sub-program 1.1.3: Security Screening

Description:

The Security Screening Program is responsible for the security screening of foreign nationals who have been referred to the CBSA by a CIC visa officer abroad or in Canada, and who are seeking to come to Canada as a permanent resident, temporary resident (e.g., visitor) or refugee, or are already in Canada and seeking to remain as a temporary or permanent resident.

The CBSA is responsible for ensuring that there are no security concerns related to the individual seeking entry to Canada (e.g., counter-terrorism, counter-espionage, war crimes, crimes against humanity and organized crime) and, based on a thorough screening exercise (including the review of information and intelligence from a wide variety of internal and external sources), makes a recommendation to CIC on the admissibility of the individual. This program is also responsible for determining the admissibility of senior diplomats being posted to Ottawa to ensure that they meet the admissibility requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
21,335,922 19,266,671 19,264,262

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
195 174 174

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Persons who may be a national security concern are found to be inadmissible to Canada

*National Security Screening includes cases pertaining to sections 34, 35 and/or 37 of the Immigration and  Refugee Protection Act

Percentage of all negative CBSA recommendations to Citizenship and Immigration relating to Temporary Residents that result in a finding of inadmissibility

*Includes refusals under other sections of the Act and remedies to overcome inadmissibilities

95% 03/2015

Percentage of all negative CBSA recommendations to Citizenship and Immigration relating to Temporary Residents that result in a finding of inadmissibility

*Includes refusals under other sections of the Act and remedies to overcome inadmissibilities

95% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to improve the performance measurement capability of the CBSA’s Immigration Security Screening Program

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15 the Agency will continue to improve the performance measurement for the National Security Screening Program to ensure the CBSA is providing effective security screening advice to CIC, and to ensure continued support of the CBSA’s commitment to the safety and security of Canadians. The CBSA will also develop a reporting tool to evaluate CIC’s satisfaction with the CBSA’s security screening work and to ensure the program is achieving optimal outcomes.

Under the National Security Screening Program (NSSP), the CBSA provides CIC with recommendations that assess the admissibility of refugee claimants as well as temporary and permanent resident applicants pursuant to sections 34 (Security); 35 (War Crimes); and 37 (Organized Crime) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA). The CBSA recommendations are provided to CIC decision makers to inform admissibility decisions under IRPA. The NSSP ensures that individuals who may pose a threat to the safety and security of Canada are denied entry, while facilitating the travel of low-risk individuals to Canada. 

Program 1.2: Secure and Trusted Partnerships

Description:

Through the Secure and Trusted Partnerships Program, the CBSA works closely with clients, other government departments and international border management partners to enhance trade chain and traveller security while providing pre-approved, low-risk travellers and traders with streamlined and efficient border processes. The CBSA develops and administers programs and cooperative agreements with its partners to ensure alignment with international standards (e.g. World Customs Organization SAFE Framework of Standards) and promote best practices in global border management. By increasing membership in trusted traveller and trader programs, the CBSA is able to improve its capacity to mitigate risk in advance and focus examination efforts on identifying travellers and traders of unknown or higher risk.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
42,062,245 42,062,245 41,432,038 40,635,411

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
483 474 476

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved


Capacity to focus on high-risk people and goods at ports of entry is increased

Percentage increase in trusted traveller programs membership from previous fiscal year

*An increase in trusted travellers will result in a decrease of unknown or high risk travellers, thereby allowing border services officers to focus more on the latter group of travellers

12% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to enhance the benefits of programs that help trusted businesses and travellers move efficiently across the border

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simply the Border Experience

The Secure and Trusted Partnership Programs facilitate the passage of low-risk travellers and goods into Canada, enhancing the safety and security of Canadians and allowing the CBSA to focus on goods and people of unknown or high risk. Increasing the efficiency and availability of these programs enhances the benefits for traders, travellers and the CBSA. It also keeps Canada aligned with our trading partners who operate similar programs.

With respect to commercial trade, the CBSA will continue working with the U.S. to align both countries' trusted trader programs while continuing to upgrade technology and enhance member benefits.

Key Commitment: Strengthen international relationships with border management agencies, administrations and organizations to promote facilitation and security for trade and travel

Related Organizational Priority: Advance Global Border Management

The CBSA will continue to leverage international relationships with partner border management agencies, administrations and organizations to mitigate threats to Canada and promote trade and travel. The Agency's continued collaboration with key partners and engagement through multilateral fora (such as the World Customs Organization, Five Country Conference (FCC), and Border Five (B5) will support the advancement of Government of Canada priorities.

In 2014–15 the CBSA will lead the development of a multiyear strategy that will guide the collaborative efforts of the B5 group (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the U.S.) to the year 2020. Canada will assume the chair of the B5 beginning in July 2014. Similarly, in 2014 the Agency will co-chair with CIC the FCC, which brings together immigration authorities of the same five nations. This will include hosting the annual plenary session and the advancement of an FCC-wide traveller facilitation scheme. Furthermore, the CBSA will continue to assert its leadership in the WCO as a member of the June 2014 Policy Commission and the Finance Committee, as well as provide regional leadership in the Americas under the auspices of the Regional Conference of Customs Directors General of the Americas and Caribbean. Particular emphasis will be placed on advancing of the WCO Economic Competitiveness Package, the authorized economic operator concept, air cargo security, capacity building, and on developing international standards for the improvement of customs data quality.

Sub-program 1.2.1: Trusted Traveller

Description:

The Trusted Traveller Programs are designed to simplify the border clearance process for pre-approved, low-risk travellers entering Canada. The CBSA offers two programs for travellers, NEXUS and CANPASS. These programs streamline (expedite and simplify) border clearance. NEXUS is a joint initiative with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in the air, land and marine modes of transportation, while CANPASS is a Canadian suite of programs for clients entering Canada by plane, corporate and private aircrafts, and private boats. Both programs are available to citizens or permanent residents of Canada and/or the U.S. and enable members to cross the border faster when travelling to Canada and, in the case of NEXUS, when travelling to the U.S.

Applicants to the programs must pass various assessments (e.g., security checks, interviews and risk assessments) specific to the program before being granted membership. NEXUS and CANPASS Air members can use iris recognition technology for passage processing at designated airports, and NEXUS members use Radio Frequency Identification technology for processing at designated highway ports of entry. Members of NEXUS or the CANPASS Private Boat, CANPASS Corporate Aircraft or CANPASS Private Aircraft programs entering Canada by private aircraft, corporate aircraft or private boat must report their arrival in advance and make their declarations to the CBSA Telephone Reporting Centre.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
32,041,289 31,502,056 31,691,431

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
366 357 359

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Border clearance is streamlined and expedited

Percentage of random referrals of NEXUS members

*NEXUS random referral rate is to be lower than conventional

≤1% 03/2015
Trusted travellers are low-risk

Percentage of Trusted Traveller members examined who are found to be in compliance with border legislation, regulations and program criteria

97% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance benefits and streamline processing of Trusted Traveller Programs (TTPs), including replacement of NEXUS kiosk technology and expansion of trusted traveller programs to third countries

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

In 2014−15, the CBSA will continue to enhance the benefits of TTPs and streamline the processing of members at ports of entry. For example, the CBSA will replace aging TTP kiosks technology with modern kiosks that are more stable and provide scalable and enhanced functionality. In addition, the CBSA will continue to advance the Beyond the Border Action Plan commitments related to enhancing NEXUS benefits by advancing work toward third-country trusted traveller programs. Under this initiative, Canadian citizens would be able to apply to third-country trusted traveller programs and vice versa, thereby receiving benefits such as expedited border clearance.

Sub-program 1.2.2: Trusted Trader

Description:

The Trusted Trader Program simplifies many of the border requirements for pre-approved, low-risk participants so that shipments can be processed more quickly and efficiently at the border. Importers approved under the Customs Self Assessment (CSA) benefit from a streamlined accounting and payment process as well as an expedited clearance option for qualified goods. Members of the Partners in Protection program benefit from enhanced supply chain security as well as lowered examination rates. In addition, members of these Trusted Trader Programs have the option of utilizing the Free and Secure Trade (FAST) lanes to transport eligible imported goods into Canada. FAST is a joint initiative between the CBSA and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

To become a member of the Trusted Trader Programs, applicants must undergo an in-depth risk assessment. Once granted membership, CSA importers can use their own business systems and processes to forward trade data to the CBSA and remit payment of duties and taxes through their own financial institutions. In addition, CSA importers can also apply for trade compliance benefits which allow approved importers the flexibility to completely self-assess and audit their revenue reporting and trade requirements.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
10,020,956 9,929,982 8,943,980

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
117 117 117

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Impact of border processing on trusted programs members is minimized

Percentage of Trusted Trader shipments examined at border

1% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance benefits to participants of Trusted Trader Programs that help businesses move efficiently across the border

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

In 2014−15, the CBSA will continue to enhance benefits to participants of Trusted Trader Programs that help businesses move efficiently across the border. The CBSA will continue harmonizing the Canadian Partners In Protection Program with the U.S. Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism Program to enhance benefits and expand membership. The CBSA will also continue the implementation of the Trusted Trader eApplication.

Program 1.3: Admissibility Determination

Description:

Through the Admissibility Determination Program, the CBSA develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships that enable border services officers to intercept people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada, and to process admissible people and goods within established service standards. In addition, the Agency develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships to control the export of goods from Canada.

In the traveller stream, border services officers question people upon arrival to determine if they and their personal goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Border services officers will then make a decision to grant entry or refer a person for further processing (e.g. payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document), and/or for a physical examination.

In the commercial stream, carriers and importers are required to provide information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers review the status of pre-arrival decisions and/or the provided accompanying documentation to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Based on this determination, a border services officer may refer the goods for further processing, examination and/or scientific/engineering analysis. Upon further examination goods may be seized or penalties imposed.

With some exceptions, all goods being exported from Canada must be reported “in writing” to the CBSA.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
681,725,979 681,725,979 647,713,847 594,877,995

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
6,548 6,461 6,455

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
People and goods who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at ports of entry Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible 3.20% 03/2015
Travellers entering Canada at a land port of entry are processed within established service standards Percentage of people reaching the primary inspection booth within the service standard 95% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

n_bw The CBSA contributes to the FSDS 2013−2016, Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians by preventing the harmful intentional and unintentional introduction of invasive alien species into Canada, detecting and identifying new species, and responding rapidly upon detection. The Agency’s Traveller Border Programs Division implements practices such as inspecting and intercepting shipments, checking customs documents, applying proper quarantine regulations and enforcing international and national legislation, to mitigate threats posed by invasive species and disease to ecosystems, economies, and societies. For more information, refer to the CBSA's Sustainable Development Strategy 2014–2017 Footnote x.  

Key Commitment: Strengthen the Agency’s ability to minimize delays for low-risk travellers and goods while optimizing measures to intercept inadmissible goods and people

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

Upholding professionalism while processing goods and travellers without compromising the CBSA’s high security standards remains the core business for the Admissibility Determination Program. To ensure this formula is employed operationally, the CBSA works closely with U.S. and other international counterparts through a shared commitment to improve cross-border facilitation and to enhance security at Canadian ports of entry, including leveraging new technologies such as biometrics.

In 2014−15, the CBSA will undertake a number of initiatives designed to modernize border services, many of them in consultation with the U.S., under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. The Admissibility Determination Program will be improving its risk mitigation capacity, increasing the efficiency of program delivery, and increasing the effectiveness of programs. The program will also focus on leveraging its strong foundation of stakeholder and partner engagement moving forward.

In 2014–15, the Agency will also continue to implement kiosk technology upgrades as part of Automated Border Clearance (ABC). This program is designed to process increased volumes of travellers and offer a secure and viable alternative for border processing through the use of self-service kiosk technology for eligible passengers travelling on valid Canadian passports or permanent resident cards. Expansion of the use of self-service kiosks in Tier 1 airports will continue through to 2015–16.

Sub-program 1.3.1: Highway Mode

Description:

The Highway Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at 117 designated land ports of entry while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards. Border services officers conduct interviews of persons and drivers of commercial carriers and then make a decision to allow the entry of a person or shipment or refer them for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) and/or examination (e.g., physical search of a vehicle, further investigation of admissibility).

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods, and carriers and exporters are required to report their goods.

Examinations may be performed with the use of specialized tools (e.g., gamma ray imaging Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System, ion scanners and detector dogs) and may include a full or partial offload of the goods to detect the presence of prohibited or restricted goods (e.g., narcotics or weapons). People and/or goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty, seizure or denied entry to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
399,594,011 374,603,732 330,945,569
* The decrease in planned spending from 2014–15 to 2015–16 is mainly due to the completion of the eManifest project, sunsetting program integrity funding  for frontline officers, as well as the delivery on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
3,662 3,575 3,584

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
People who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at land ports of entry Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at highway ports 4% 03/2015
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at a highway port of entry Percentage of people examined at a highway port of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 1% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, Canada and the U.S. have committed to jointly plan investments and enhance client service along the Canada–U.S. border

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

Sustaining client service excellence for the Highway Mode in a constantly evolving operational environment requires investments in border management technology. In 2014–15, the Agency will develop a pilot of remote traveller processing, which is expected to be implemented at two small and remote ports of entry during the following fiscal year. The pilot will enable the CBSA to assess the viability of using technology to process travellers remotely. The Agency will also continue to support investment in infrastructure improvements designed to increase facilitation in the highway mode (e.g., Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, Truck Cargo Pre-inspection Pilot Project (Phase 2)). These initiatives are aligned with the Agency’s commitments in the Beyond the Border Action Plan, which directs both countries to jointly plan investments and support the facilitation of trade and travel across the Canada–U.S. border.

Sub-program 1.3.2: Air Mode

Description:

The Air Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at designated airports while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Upon arrival, border services officers conduct interviews of persons seeking entry into Canada, aided by electronic pre-arrival risk-assessment information submitted by the airlines. CBSA officers make a decision to admit the person or refer them for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) or examination.

For private and corporate aircraft and general aviation traffic reporting through the Telephone Reporting Centre, various checks are conducted by means of the telephone reporting system. Border services officers make a decision to admit people or refer them for further processing or examination.

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods, and carriers and exporters are required to report their goods. More specifically, air carriers are required to submit electronic pre-arrival information related to their goods for import. Those goods meeting the requirements of border-related legislation are released at the airport or at a designated sufferance warehouse, while those goods identified as being potentially inadmissible are held for an examination.

To assist border services officers in their examinations, detection tools such as detector dogs and ion scanners may be used. People and goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty, seizure or denied entry to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
181,958,499 183,803,872 180,815,165

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
1,976 1,980 1,971

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
People and their goods that are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at air ports of entry Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at air ports of entry 3.54% 03/2015
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at airports of entry Percentage of people examined at air ports of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 1.3% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to remain diligent in mitigating risks posed through the air mode, while ensuring the facilitation of low-risk travellers

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

Considering the increasing volume of air travellers crossing Canada’s border, it is a priority for the CBSA to identify individuals of interest before they board an aircraft and to facilitate the travel experience of low-risk individuals by working with industry and other external clients. A major modernization effort is underway, as previously outlined in the Entry/Exit and Interactive Advance Passenger Information initiatives under the Risk Assessment Program. The CBSA will continue to engage and work collaboratively with air industry stakeholders and other federal government departments to ensure effective development and integration of procedures and processes to meet the Agency’s commitment to border security and traveller facilitation. Additionally, in 2014−15, the Agency will finalize a plan to implement its vision for air traveller processing, including further automation of traveller processing.

Sub-program 1.3.3: Rail Mode

Description:

The Rail Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at a rail port of entry or rail yard, while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Rail operators are required to report train, passenger and/or cargo information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers may conduct onboard interviews of travellers seeking entry into Canada upon arrival at the border to determine their admissibility or whether further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) or examination (e.g., physical search of baggage, further investigation of admissibility) is required.

In the commercial stream, border services officers review the electronic information submitted by the rail carrier and the importer/exporter, and make a decision to release the cargo or refer it for an examination at the rail yard.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
18,861,342 18,860,420 18,860,129

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
143 143 143

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at rail ports of entry Percentage of people examined at rail ports of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA

0.01%

03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to support finalization of a new agreement to cover land, marine and rail pre-clearance

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

Under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, a new agreement to cover land, marine and rail pre-clearance is currently being negotiated between Canada and the U.S. It is anticipated that this new pre-clearance agreement will provide an enabling framework for pre-clearance initiatives to be jointly deployed with the U.S., when and where appropriate, including in the rail mode.

Sub-program 1.3.4: Marine Mode

Description:

The Marine Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at a marine port of entry, while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Prior to arrival in the traveller stream, border services officers receive information regarding the passengers and crew aboard cruise ships, ferries, tour boats, private small vessels in the Trusted Traveller Program and commercial vessels. At large cruise ship offices and certain ferry terminals, passengers are processed using Integrated Primary Inspection Line. For those private vessels reporting through the Telephone Reporting Centre, various checks are conducted by means of the telephone reporting system. Border services officers make decisions to admit people or refer them for further processing or examination.

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods. Carriers and exporters are required to report their goods; marine carriers are required to submit advance electronic information for imports and have the option for exports. To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as Remote Operated Vehicles and the Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System are used. In major ports, 100 percent of marine containers are scanned for the presence of radiological material using radiation portals. People and goods that are found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to enforcement action which may include a monetary penalty, seizure, or being denied entry to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
49,204,277 49,041,951 49,028,208

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
523 523 523

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
People who  are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at marine ports of entry Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at a marine port of entry 2.60% 03/2015
Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at marine ports of entry Percentage of people examined at a marine port of entry who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA 1.3% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Two new marine container examination facilities will be built by the Port Authority in Vancouver, in collaboration with the CBSA, to be able to meet the examination requirements

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

Under the Beyond the Border Action Plan (Integrated Cargo Security Strategy initiative), the CBSA has identified addressing risks and vulnerabilities in the commercial marine mode as a priority in 2014−15. Specifically, the Agency will address container examination capacity challenges in order to improve its ability to intercept goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA at marine ports of entry. The CBSA will work with industry to build, outfit and staff two new marine container examination facilities, including deployment of new detection technology and procedures, to increase its examination capacity and directly mitigate related risks in the marine mode.

Sub-program 1.3.5: Postal

Description:

The Postal Program identifies and intercepts international mail items valued at less than CAD$2,500 that are inadmissible to Canada while ensuring that admissible mail items are processed within established service standards, and applicable duties and taxes are assessed and collected. Mail items valued at CAD$2,500 or higher are processed in the regular commercial import stream.

The Postal Program operates at three CBSA Mail Centres in Canada. Border services officers conduct an inspection of international mail items to determine whether further processing (e.g., assessment and payment of duties and/or taxes) and/or a physical examination is required. Mail items that do not require CBSA intervention are released to Canada Post for delivery.

To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as X-ray and detector dogs may be used. Mail items found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be seized on behalf of other government departments. Importers are advised of their appeal rights, and Canada Post is advised that the item has been taken from the mail stream. All other items that are deemed admissible, after examination, are released to Canada Post for delivery.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
28,981,892 18,278,122 12,103,239
* The decrease in planned spending from 2014−15 to 2015−16 and 2015−16 to 2016−17 is due to the completion of the Postal Modernization project and the return of efficiency gains to the consolidated revenue fund.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
196 192 186

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Mail that is non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA is intercepted at a Postal centre

Percentage of examined international mail items that are seized

2.50% 03/2015

Percentage of opened and examined international mail items that are seized

5% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: The CBSA will continue to partner with Canada Post Corporation to improve the facilitation of mail for Canadians and stakeholders.

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

The CBSA will remain diligent in mitigating risks posed through the postal mode, while ensuring timely delivery across the supply chain and the safety and prosperity of Canadians. Working closely with the Canada Post Corporation, the CBSA will continue to improve facilitation of mail. A major postal modernization effort is underway to strengthen the secure and efficient movement of international mail through integration of new and improved procedures and processes. This modernization effort is also part of the CBSA risk response strategy linked to the Contraband risk and the CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile.

Sub-program 1.3.6: Courier Low Value Shipment

Description:

The Courier Low Value Shipment (LVS) Program identifies and intercepts courier importations that are inadmissible to Canada. The importations, conducted by approved courier participants, enter at designated sufferance warehouses. This provides a streamlined reporting, release and accounting process for most courier importations valued at less than CAD$2,500. Mail items valued at CAD$2,500 or higher are removed from the Program and processed in the regular commercial process.

To participate in the Courier LVS Program, a courier company must be pre-approved by the CBSA. Prior to the arrival of a courier shipment, the CBSA reviews the electronic information submitted by the courier to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of the Program and applicable legislation and/or if a physical examination is required. If a physical examination is required, the item is presented to a border services officer upon arrival. To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as targets and detector dogs may be used. Goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty or seizure.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
3,125,958 3,125,750 3,125,685

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
48 48 48

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Courier shipments that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted Percentage of courier shipments examined that are removed from the Courier Low Value Shipment Program and transferred to the regular import stream because the goods were prohibited, restricted, controlled or non-compliant 9% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: The CBSA will continue to develop and implement regulations and systems to meet the standards of the World Customs Organization and the World Trade Organization and commitments made under the Beyond the Border Action Plan for Low Value Shipments.

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

Facilitating the processing of low-value import shipments, without compromising the CBSA’s high security standards remains the core business of the Courier Low Value Shipments Program. As part of the delivery of this program, the CBSA is committed to developing and implementing regulations and systems to meet the standards of the World Customs Organization and the World Trade Organization, as well as to become more aligned with U.S. standards.

Under Courier LVS Program modernization, the Agency will take a balanced approach to national security and trade facilitation. Specifically, in 2014−15 the CBSA will continue to augment the number of participants’ proprietary systems that are used to electronically report their shipments. This will improve the efficiency of the program by allowing the CBSA to electronically review shipments reported for release by the program’s participants. In addition, the CBSA will complete a feasibility study to determine the best option to incorporate the program’s imports into the CBSA’s pre-arrival risk assessment model.

Program 1.4: Criminal Investigations

Description:

Under the Criminal Investigations Program, the CBSA protects the integrity of border-related legislation and contributes to public safety and Canada’s economic security by investigating and pursuing the prosecution of persons who commit criminal offences in contravention of Canada’s border-related legislation.

CBSA investigators review potential border legislation violations and gather evidence using a variety of investigative techniques, including search warrants and production orders. These violations include criminal offences under the Customs Act, Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, various food/plant and animal legislation, and other border-related legislation. In conjunction with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the CBSA pursues the prosecution of individuals or business entities who violate Canada’s border-related legislation.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
23,391,775 23,391,775 23,391,775 23,391,775

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
279 279 279

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Crown counsel accepts referrals for prosecution prepared by CBSA

Percentage of referrals for prosecution accepted by Crown

95% 03/2015

CBSA Program (Intelligence, Port of Entry, Inland, Compliance Verification, etc.) referrals to Investigations that result in an opened case

Percentage of the CBSA Program (Intelligence, Port of Entry, Inland, Compliance Verification, etc.) referrals to criminal investigations that result in an opened case

55% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Strengthen the Criminal Investigations Program

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15, the Agency will continue to concentrate efforts on investigating an increased number of complex immigration and import/export cases. In addition, efforts aimed at intercepting and enforcing the laws pertaining to the illegal importation/exportation of high-risk commodities at ports of entry, such as firearms smuggling, will be strengthened alongside improving computer forensic and intelligence analysis support capability. The Agency will continue to target high-risk criminal non-compliance and the organizers or facilitators of fraud; to increase the role of intelligence in the investigation of crimes; to renew the training program for criminal investigators; and, to advance investigatory IT systems and tools.

Key Commitment: Enhance the integration of the CBSA’s intelligence, criminal investigations, and inland enforcement responsibilities to achieve greater efficiency and effectiveness

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15, the Agency will further integrate policy development for the CBSA intelligence and enforcement programs, improve intelligence support and linkages with the CBSA criminal investigations program, enhance core training and officer career paths, identify system requirements, and improve program outcomes. This commitment allows the Agency to fully implement an integrated approach to the management of border risks to better focus enforcement activities against the Agency’s enforcement priorities and mandate. The Agency will also strengthen the investigation referral process by creating one point of contact per region for referrals to criminal investigations, intelligence or inland enforcement to enhance the CBSA's capacity to better manage referrals and cases and monitor program performance.

Program 1.5: Immigration Enforcement

Description:

The Immigration Enforcement Program determines whether foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada are identified and investigated, detained, monitored and/or removed from Canada.

Foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada believed to be inadmissible are investigated and may have a report written against them by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Depending on the type of inadmissibility, the merits of the report are reviewed by either a Minister’s delegate or an independent decision maker at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) where a CBSA hearings officer represents the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Subsequent to this review, a removal order may be issued against the foreign national or permanent resident in question. Removal orders issued against refugee claimants are conditional and do not come into force until the claim is abandoned, withdrawn or denied by the IRB.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
164,911,279 164,911,279 158,549,531 138,751,772
* The decrease in planned spending from 2014−15 to 2015−16 and 2015−16 to 2016−17 is mainly due to the completion of the Refugee Reform project, the Arming of Border Services Officers, sunsetting of funding for the cessation and vacation refugee claims activities related to the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, as well as the delivery on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
1,198 1,203 1,096

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Immigration enforcement actions are focused on high priority foreign nationals and permanent residents who may pose a safety and/or security risk to Canada

Percentage of high-priority foreign nationals removed from Canada compared to the high-priority population in the removals inventory

*Based on annual average

100% 03/2015

Timely removal of failed refugee claimants who are inadmissible to Canada

Percentage of failed refugee claimants removed from Canada within 12 months of a negative decision from the Refugee Protection Division or Refugee Appeal Division 80% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: To monitor and assess the effectiveness and impact of the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

The Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act introduced major reforms to Canada’s immigration system, including:

  • changes to the refugee status determination system that are intended to deliver faster decisions, deter abuse and quickly remove failed refugee claimants;
  • measures to strengthen the immigration system by reducing identity fraud through the use of biometric data, such as fingerprints and photos in the Temporary Resident Program; and,
  • measures to address human smuggling and irregular arrivals.

The Agency will draft regulatory amendments to support these legislative changes. The Agency will also monitor how trends in the new system are evolving and impacting on other CBSA and partner agency activities. This will assist the Agency in identifying and assessing further efficiencies in business processes that support the immigration system.

Sub-program 1.5.1: Immigration Investigation

Description:

The Immigration Investigations Program investigates reports and arrests foreign nationals and permanent residents already in Canada who are or may be inadmissible to Canada as defined by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Investigation techniques can include data analysis of information collected regarding an individual’s immigration application, physical surveillance to locate fugitive inadmissible persons, and field searches of residences and belongings for evidence. Depending on the type of inadmissibility and the status of the person in question, inadmissibility reports are reviewed by either a Minister’s Delegate or the IRB. When a person fails to appear for an immigration proceeding such as an examination, admissibility hearing or removal interview, a warrant for their arrest may be issued. Warrants may also be issued against a foreign national or permanent resident where a CBSA inland enforcement officer has reasonable grounds to believe that they are inadmissible to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
74,270,252 69,478,048 53,482,888
* The decrease in planned spending from 2014−15 to 2015−16 and 2015−16 to 2016−17 is mainly due to the completion of the Refugee Reform project, the Arming of Border Services Officers, as well as the delivery on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
631 648 570

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Immigration investigations are conducted against foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada

Percentage of immigration investigations initiated that result in a person being identified as inadmissible to Canada

55% 03/2015

Timely investigation of foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada

Percentage of immigration investigations finalized within one year of being initiated

95% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Support the Government's reform of the refugee determination system through initiatives that facilitate the timely removal of failed refugee claimants and enhance the Agency’s capacity to investigate and locate foreign nationals and permanent residents in contravention of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

The CBSA is responsible for investigating, detaining, and removing foreign nationals and permanent residents found to be inadmissible to Canada, or who pose a threat to Canada, including persons involved in terrorism, organized crime, war crimes and crimes against humanity. By strengthening immigration investigations, the capacity and ability of the CBSA to investigate and locate inadmissible foreign nationals for enforcement proceedings, including removal, as soon as possible, will be enhanced.

In 2014−15, the CBSA will continue to support the Government of Canada's reform of the refugee determination system through initiatives that facilitate the timely removal of failed refugee claimants. The Agency will focus its efforts on removing inadmissible persons and will continue to build its capacity in 2014−15, to investigate and locate foreign nationals and permanent residents in contravention of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Continued emphasis will be placed on cases of marriages of convenience.

To support these efforts, the Agency will negotiate information sharing arrangements to assist in identifying and locating foreign nationals who are wanted for immigration enforcement with partner agencies and departments, both domestically and internationally. Particular emphasis will be placed on increasing immigration information sharing with the U.S. in 2014−15 under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. Additional efforts will also be made to identify immigration consultants who operate in a manner that abuses the immigration process (consultant fraud).

Sub-program 1.5.2: Detentions

Description:

The Detentions Program detains and/or monitors the conditions of release of foreign nationals or permanent residents where there are reasonable grounds to believe the individual is inadmissible to Canada and where the individual is a danger to the public, poses a flight risk or where their identity is not established. Foreign nationals and permanent residents may also be detained upon entry into Canada for an examination or where the individual is suspected of being inadmissible for security reasons. They are entitled to an IRB hearing after being detained for 48 hours, 7 days and 30 days. The CBSA has three immigration holding centres in Canada located at Vancouver, Toronto and Montréal.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
42,233,748 42,233,610 42,231,066

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
140 140 140

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Foreign nationals and permanent residents that may pose a risk to the safety and security of Canada are detained

Percentage of foreign nationals and permanent residents who may be inadmissible to Canada or who may be ready for removal who are detained  according to their assessed level of risk

85% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Pursue the establishment and maintenance of detention agreements with provinces that assist the Agency in detaining higher risk individuals pursuant to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA)

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

The Detentions Program is responsible for ensuring that the treatment of the Agency’s detainee population is being carried out under the CBSA’s National Detention Standards as well as the obligations set out in various international instruments to which Canada is signatory. Persons detained under IRPA are held in either a CBSA-run immigration holding centre or a provincial correctional facility under a fee-for-service arrangement.

The Agency relies on provincial jails to hold immigration detainees who represent a higher risk (e.g. significant criminal records, serious criminality, member of an organized crime or street gang, war crimes or crimes against humanity), and to house lower-risk immigration detainees in areas where the CBSA does not have a holding centre. In 2014−15, the Agency will aim to implement Detention Agreements with Ontario and Quebec and commence Detention Agreement negotiations with other provinces.

Sub-program 1.5.3: Immigration Hearings

Description:

The Immigration Hearings Program ensures that the Government of Canada’s interests are represented at immigration proceedings before the IRB of Canada which determines the immigration and detention status of foreign nationals and permanent residents already in Canada, in accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. CBSA hearings officers are responsible for representing the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of CIC at immigration proceedings before the IRB. This function ensures that foreign nationals and permanent residents who are inadmissible to Canada are denied status, and removal orders are issued where appropriate.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
19,716,635 19,715,539 15,919,941
* The decrease in planned spending from 2015−16 to 2016−17 is mainly attributed to the sunsetting of funding for the cessation and vacation refugee claims activities related to the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
199 199 170

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

The position of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of CIC with respect to immigration status is represented and upheld at administrative proceedings before the IRB

Percentage of decisions rendered by Members of the IRB and outcomes that align with the priorities of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of CIC 70% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: The CBSA will investigate and refer an increased volume of cessation and vacation hearings to the Refugee Protection Division of the Immigration and Refugee Board

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15, the CBSA is committed to increasing the number of cessation or vacation cases referrals to the IRB, while ensuring that in successful cessation or vacation cases, the removal orders are enforced as soon as possible. The Agency will also establish specialized processes to manage tips and referrals, as well as analyze trends, and provide information, guidance and training to CBSA staff and partners regarding roles, responsibilities and relevant procedures.

Sub-program 1.5.4: Removals

Description:

The Removals Program ensures that foreign nationals and permanent residents with an enforceable removal order are removed from Canada. Once a person is removal-ready, an interview is conducted to ensure that a travel document is available and that a pre-removal risk assessment is offered by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Where a valid travel document is not available, CBSA inland enforcement officers liaise with foreign embassies to secure the required travel documents. The CBSA may have to make further arrangements for removal, which could include arranging for travel (e.g., purchasing an airline ticket or chartering a plane for high-risk individuals in exceptional cases), providing escorts (e.g., to respond to airline and transit country requirements), and liaising with CBSA staff abroad (migration integrity officers) to ensure smooth passage from Canada to the final destination.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
28,690,644 27,122,334 27,117,877

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
228 216 216

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Timely removal of foreign nationals subject to an enforceable removal order

Average number of days to facilitate a removal of a failed claimant from Canada pre-Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act (PCISA)

* PCISA came into force December 15, 2012

550 03/2015

Average number of days to facilitate a removal of a failed claimant from Canada post-Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act (PCISA)

365 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance the capacity and ability of the Agency to remove foreign national criminals, failed refugee claimants and other inadmissible foreign nationals from Canada in a timely manner

Related Organizational Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

In 2014−15 and beyond, the CBSA will continue negotiations on removal arrangements with problematic countries to ensure the timely issuance of travel documents. The Agency will also continue to deliver the Assisted Voluntary Returns and Reintegration Pilot in cooperation with the International Organization for Migration with a view to encourage cost-effective and efficient voluntary returns of failed refugee claimants. In 2014−15 the Agency will continue to strengthen the results, effectiveness and efficiency of the Removals Program through the implementation of the Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act and related regulations, and by considering a pilot project for escorted removals.

Program 1.6: Recourse

Description:

The Recourse Program provides the business community and individuals with an accessible mechanism to seek an impartial review of service-related complaints, program decisions and enforcement actions taken by the CBSA. This program ensures that its decisions are fair, transparent and accurately reflect the Agency’s policies and the Acts administered by the CBSA.

Individuals can complete a written submission if they disagree with an enforcement action or a program decision made by the CBSA or wish to submit a complaint or compliment about services. Clients are provided with a timely acknowledgement of their correspondence, before CBSA officials conduct a thorough review, taking into consideration the legislation administered by the Agency, CBSA policies, the client’s point of view and, where necessary, technical opinions from CBSA experts or legal advice from the Department of Justice. Individuals who are not satisfied with the CBSA’s review can appeal to the appropriate court, tribunal or external review body.

The Recourse Program also facilitates the review of external complaints of discrimination filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and assists the Department of Justice representing the Agency on appeals to the Federal Court, various tribunals and other external bodies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
9,832,518 9,832,518 9,832,518 9,832,518

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
102 102 102

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Initial contact with the appellant is timely Percentage of Trade and Enforcement appeals acknowledged in 10 days 85% 03/2015
Timely decisions made in support of border services legislation Percentage of Enforcement Appeals decided in 180 days 75% 03/2015
Percentage of Trade Appeals decided in 180 days 70% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Implement the Recourse Modernization Initiative to ensure the Agency’s recourse functions are streamlined and have a focus on client service

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

The goal of continuous program improvement will define business for the 2014–15 fiscal year. Key activities include: the piloting of an issue-based process for reviewing trade appeals; enhancing the Recourse Content Management System; and the monitoring of, and reporting on, performance against service standards.

Conducting recourse activities effectively means capitalizing on extensive cooperation between the Agency’s programs and frontline operations. In furthering the CBSA’s commitment to client service, the Recourse Program will provide feedback on appeal decisions and complaint responses to its internal Agency partners to ensure continuous improvement.

Program 1.7: Revenue and Trade Management

Description:

The Revenue and Trade Management Program ensures that duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are collected in compliance with Canadian trade and imports reporting requirements. For the purposes of this program description, “duties” means any duties or taxes levied or imposed on imported goods under certain Acts that the CBSA is responsible for administering. The program administers international and regional trade agreements and domestic legislation and regulations governing trade in commercial goods. Through its work on free trade negotiations, the program helps to strengthen international rules related to trade and open new markets for Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
73,918,165 73,918,165 69,117,374 66,928,881

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
814 816 801

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved
Duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are collected in accordance with trade policies

Percentage of compliance* of importers with Canada's trade laws and importing requirements


* This compliance rate is determined through a random verification process. Compliance is defined as a verification that results in less than $1000 owed to the Government of Canada

75% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Support the Government of Canada's free trade negotiations

Related Organizational Priority: Advance Global Border Management

Ready access to a broad range of imported goods, and to foreign markets for exported domestic products, ensures Canada’s continued economic prosperity and drives the business of the CBSA’s Revenue and Trade Management Program. Through its work on free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations, the Agency helps to strengthen international rules related to trade and to open new markets for Canadians by increasing the opportunities for, and the predictability of, export sales. This work contributes to the creation of jobs and boosts Canadian profits which, in turn, stimulate the economy. The CBSA supports various aspects of the FTA negotiations, specifically related to the customs procedures, trade facilitation, and intellectual property rights chapters. Once FTAs are entered into force, the CBSA manages the implementation of these border-related chapters.

In 2014–15, the CBSA will continue to participate in ongoing free trade negotiations involving international and multinational partners: in particular India, Japan, South Korea, the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Caribbean Community; as well as negotiations to expand and modernize the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement. The Agency remains committed to supporting any new free trade negotiations undertaken by the Government of Canada and to implementing the provisions of those agreements that are finalized and entered into force in 2014–15. In particular, if finalized and entered into force in 2014–15, the Agency will implement the provisions of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, agreed to in principle in October 2013.

Working with the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development and the World Customs Organization, in 2014–15 the CBSA will support the Government of Canada’s efforts to ratify and implement the World Trade Organization’s Trade Facilitation Agreement, concluded in December 2013.

Key Commitment: Continue to modernize and optimize systems and processes that support the assessment and collection of revenue from importers

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

The CBSA will continue its efforts to improve compliance with Canada’s trade legislation and regulations by concluding a comprehensive review of its trade-related policies and by introducing new web content for importers. In 2014–15, through the CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM) initiative, work will continue with the planning and phased delivery of new systems and procedures to simplify the assessment process and introduce new payment options for importers. In this fiscal year, the program will also begin to introduce a revised trade compliance strategy that will ensure the collection of accurate program data while increasing the CBSA’s return on investment. Finally, the program is developing a more efficient means of measuring trade compliance that will continue to produce statistically valid data while allowing for more resources to be allocated to targeted verifications that typically result in larger assessments.

Sub-program 1.7.1: Anti-Dumping and Countervailing

Description:

The Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Program is responsible for the administration of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA). Its role is to provide assistance to Canadian producers who face unfair foreign competition from dumped or subsidized goods in the Canadian marketplace. SIMA provides measures of redress against such goods when they have caused injury to the Canadian industry, and is in keeping with Canada's international obligations as a signatory to the World Trade Organization. Protecting Canadian industry against the injury from dumped or subsidized imports requires a two-track approach, with the CBSA responsible for determining whether imports are being dumped or subsidized, and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal making the decision of whether these imports have caused injury to Canadian production.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
3,970,560 3,970,560 3,973,414

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
114 114 114

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Canadian industry is protected from economic injury caused by the subsidizing and dumping of imported goods

Value of Canadian production protected as the result of applying the Special Import Measures Act

$7 billion 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhancing investigative and policy capacity to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of Canada’s anti-dumping and countervailing process

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

Along with the Canadian International Trade Tribunal, the Agency is responsible for the administration of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA). This Act represents the legislative framework in Canada to implement certain rights and obligations established under the auspices of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

In administering SIMA, the CBSA is currently protecting more than $7 billion in Canadian production. To continuously perform this function well, the Agency requires a highly specialized workforce, trained in conducting complex dumping and subsidy investigations, while respecting SIMA and Canada’s rights and obligations under the relevant WTO agreements.

Given the recent increases in the number of subsidy investigations, in 2014–15, the Agency will enhance the investigative and policy analysis capacity of its officers by developing and delivering advanced training on the administration of the SIMA and specifically on conducting subsidy investigations.

Sub-program 1.7.2: Trade Policy

Description:

The Trade Policy Program is responsible for interpreting the legislation and regulations that govern the tariff classification, origin and value of imported goods, and the related assessment of duties and taxes, so as to ensure that persons engaged in the importation of goods into Canada fully understand all of the trade-related requirements in order to promote self-compliance. The Program also administers Canada’s trade incentive initiatives (e.g., duties deferral, customs warehouses, remissions, and drawbacks) which assist Canadian businesses in remaining competitive in international markets. Further, the Program is responsible for the negotiation of the origin procedures that are included in all of Canada’s free trade agreements, which serve to strengthen international trade rules and open new markets for Canadians. Finally, the program is responsible for representing the views of Canadian businesses in international trade fora, such as the World Customs Organization and the World Trade Organization, in order to ensure a fair and accessible global trading environment.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
6,171,968 6,171,968 6,171,968

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
59 59 59

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Importers have access to interpretations, rulings, advice and guidance on trade-related issues

Percentage of advance rulings released within 120 calendar days of receipt of full information

95% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: To ensure that Canadian importers have ready access to information about Canada’s trade legislation, regulations and policies in order to promote self-compliance

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

In today’s global trade environment, Canadian businesses face complex legislative and regulatory requirements and ongoing foreign competition. To help importers gain a competitive edge by minimizing their risk, optimizing their trade operations, and improving their bottom line, the CBSA is currently working to develop and implement more efficient self-service options that will allow importers to better understand and comply with Canada’s trade requirements.

In 2014–15, the CBSA will complete a comprehensive review of its trade policies. Further, the Agency will offer importers access to a redesigned website that ensures that the most up-to-date, trade-related information is readily available in one, easily identifiable place. In 2014–15, the Agency will also continue, through its CARM initiative, to implement a system that will allow for the majority of the Agency’s advance rulings and national customs rulings to be published on its website. Finally, to further enhance the communication of trade-related information to Canadian importers, the CBSA is committed to engaging with its clients in at least three significant public forums during the course of this fiscal year.

Sub-program 1.7.3: Trade Compliance

Description:

The Trade Compliance Program works to ensure that Canadian importers accurately account for the commercial goods that they bring into Canada and pay all of the duties and taxes owing. Compliance activities include random verifications, selected using a statistical model, that are used to measure the rate of compliance by product type and/or industry. The results also provide valuable information that often lead to more focused, risk-based verifications in instances where non-compliance is suspected. These trade compliance activities are supported by robust monitoring and administrative penalty programs that are aimed at maintaining a level playing field for all Canadian importers by making certain that the rules apply equally to everyone and that the appropriate duties and taxes are paid in full.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*

2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
63,775,637 58,974,846 56,783,499
*The decrease in planned spending from 2014–15 to 2015–16 is mainly due to the completion of the project definition phase of the CARM project. In addition, the decrease in planned spending from 2014–15 to 2015–16 and 2015–16 to 2016–17 is due to the delivery on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
641 643 628

Performance Measurement

Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be
Achieved

Importers are in compliance with Canadian trade laws

Percentage of revenue-based, targeted compliance verifications that yield a positive result for the CBSA (i.e., $1000 or more owing to the Government of Canada)

85% 03/2015

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: To ensure that Canadian importers are in compliance with Canada’s trade laws and that all of the duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are properly assessed

Related Organizational Priority: Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

Each year, the CBSA assesses approximately $25 billion in total import revenue. While that amount of revenue is influenced by the economy and fluctuating trade volumes, vulnerabilities related to importer non-compliance increase the risk that the Government of Canada will not collect the full amount of duties and taxes owing.

In 2014–15, the Agency is exploring options to distribute its measurement workload over multiple years to allow for more resources to be allocated to targeted verifications, which typically result in larger assessments.

Further, the Agency will continue to assist Canadian importers in improving and sustaining their compliance with import requirements by publishing both the Trade Verification Manual and the Trade Incentives Manual on the CBSA’s website. In this fiscal year, the Agency will also implement a process through which importers can submit blanket adjustments, whereby amendments are matched to original entries to properly verify the amount of duty and taxes owed.  

Internal Services

Description:

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
585,248,014 585,248,014 564,231,925 541,658,255

Human Resources (FTEs)

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
3,243 3,192 3,136

Planning Highlights

g_bw The CBSA’s Internal Services play a significant role in the implementation of sustainable development and ensure that its commitments to Theme IV of the FSDS 2013–2016 – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government – are achieved. The Agency is responsible for targets in the following areas: greenhouse gas emissions reduction, real property environmental performance, green procurement, sustainable workplace operations, greening services to clients, and water management. For details on the Agency's activities related to these target areas, refer to the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information TableFootnote xi .  

Key Commitment: Well-designed and agile business – Employing efficient and effective business models that align with strategic priorities and available resources to achieve Agency goals.

Related Organizational Priority: Strengthen Organizational Resilience

Employing efficient and effective business models requires focused efforts on strengthening strategic planning and improving the tools and resources to support better management and decision making. In 2014–15, the CBSA will continue to strengthen its planning, design, and implementation of Agency-wide business processes, policies, tools and solutions needed for sound stewardship and decision making on resources. This will ensure resources continue to be aligned with strategic priorities, and are informed by a robust risk-management regime.

Key Commitment: Frontline Service Delivery – Entrenching service excellence across the spectrum of border services provided by the Agency.

Related Organizational Priority: Strengthen Organizational Resilience

In providing frontline services to Canadians and stakeholders, high standards of client service excellence are essential. In support of this ongoing commitment, in 2014–15 the Agency will continue implementing service excellence initiatives and monitoring satisfaction in the delivery of border services, including the development of a strategy to address an increase in requests for services in remote locations in northern Canada. The Agency will also promote the CBSA brand, identity, mandate and culture. In delivering a unified image, one built upon professional standards and a collective sense of purpose, the CBSA will help increase the public’s recognition of and trust in the effective and efficient delivery of trade and travel, and strengthened security.

In pursuing service excellence, and by contributing to the Government of Canada Open Data Initiative, the CBSA will ensure that its public information, whether provided through the CBSA website, the Canada.ca website, traditional media, social media, or other communications means, is more accessible and streamlined to provide up-to-date, accurate and timely information for Canadians and stakeholders. By enhancing communication with the public, confidence in the Agency’s ability to administer its programs and services will be increased.

Finally, in 2014–15, the CBSA will continue to modernize its emergency management practices to allow the Agency to better predict, monitor, react and recover from significant events that can impact border travel and service delivery. To that end the Agency will develop a policy framework for the effective management of significant events which will set the foundation for an incident command system.

Key Commitment: Modern, Responsive and Enabling Infrastructure – Maintaining modern technologies, information systems and physical assets to increase productivity and improve decision making.

Related Organizational Priority: Strengthen Organizational Resilience

Strengthening information management to support business needs; using science and engineering to support a modern border services agency; and implementing an infrastructure plan for critical systems and facilities, all remain enabling priorities for 2014–15. Mitigating significant disruptions to frontline services and the resulting impact on the strength of the Canadian economy and the security of Canadians has the CBSA constantly employing intelligence, science, sophisticated analytics and information systems to ensure the most effective management of border-related risks throughout the continuum. In 2014–15, the CBSA will continue to strengthen its science and engineering services in the area of detection technology, forensics, analytics, and radio telecommunications. The CBSA will also continue to develop and implement a plan to decommission aging and legacy business applications, and assure the availability of information technology and information management business systems to optimize border operations. This activity is also part of the risk response strategy linked to the IT Systems risk and aligns with the CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile.

Improving critical facilities with related technology systems will also provide border services officers with refined physical assets at ports of entry, resulting in a better border experience for the Agency’s clients. High standards of frontline service delivery will be enhanced through the development and gradual implementation of a long-term plan for a cost-effective and sustainable infrastructure program with a short-term focus on critical facilities and addressing risks.

Key Commitment: Employee Excellence – Ensuring a motivated, knowledgeable and innovative workforce that continually improves border integrity and security

Related Organizational Priority: Strengthen Organizational Resilience

In 2014–15, the CBSA will continue to renew its workforce in order to deliver the Agency’s Border Modernization agenda in support of a high-performing, bilingual and mobile frontline workforce. The primary initiative in this renewal is our three-part Officer Induction Model which includes: a national recruitment program focused on candidates that meet evolving operational needs; the Officer Induction Training Program at the CBSA College which provides intensive training including firearm certification of recruits; and the Officer Induction Development Program which supports and assesses trainees in their transition to the field operations. Continued enhancement of the model will remain a priority for the Agency.

In 2014-15, the CBSA will further its transition to an armed law enforcement agency and deliver on its commitment to arm the majority of CBSA officers by the end of fiscal year 2015-16. The Agency will continue to work with public safety partners on areas of mutual interest including training development and the use of specialized training infrastructure. Finally, the CBSA will develop a strategy for ongoing delivery of Arming and Use of Force training to ensure that CBSA officers are equipped with the necessary tools and skills to perform their duties in a safe and effective manner.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the CBSA’s operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the CBSA’s websiteFootnote xii .

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)

Financial information Estimated
Results 2013−14
Planned Results
2014–15
Change
Total expenses 1,970,001,000 1,897,828,000 (72,173,000)
Total revenues 16,430,000 16,430,000 -
Net cost of operations  1,953,571,000 1,881,398,000 (72,173,000)

Total expenses for the 2014–15 year are estimated to be $1.898 billion. This is a decrease of approximately $72 million or 3.7% compared to the 2013–14 year where total expenses were estimated to be $1.970 billion.

Total revenues are estimated to be $16.43 million in both years.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the CBSA’s websiteFootnote xiii .

  • Greening Government Operations;
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations over the next three fiscal years;
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects; and
  • User Fees.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and EvaluationsFootnote xiv publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For more information on the CBSA and its activities, please visit the CBSA’s website at : http://www.asfc-cbsa.gc.ca.

Contact Information for General Inquiries

By Telephone:

Within Canada: 1-800-461-9999
Outside Canada (long distance charges apply): 1-204-983-3500 or 1-506-636-5064
TTY within Canada (For those with hearing or speech impairments): 1-866-335-3237

By Email:

Contact@cbsa.gc.ca

By Mail:

Canada Border Services Agency
Ottawa, ON
Canada
K1A 0L8

Endnotes

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