Archived - PART III - Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP)

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Catalogue No. PS35-6E-PDF
ISSN 2292-5384

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Erratum

Subsequent to tabling in Parliament and online publication of the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities, errors in the Section I table entitled "Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs" and in the Section II tables under Program 1.4 and Program 1.7 entitled "Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)" were corrected in both the French html and pdf versions. Specifically, an invalid footnote was removed from the "Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs" table while explanatory notes were added to the "Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)" tables under Program 1.4 and Program 1.7.


Minister’s Message

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency PreparednessAs Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, it is my pleasure to present to Parliament the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

The CBSA works to protect the well-being of Canadians against the full scope of threats and emergencies that can affect our border security. Along with its partners in the Public Safety Portfolio, the CBSA plays a vital role in helping to deliver on our commitment to keep Canada safe, while protecting the rights of Canadians.  The CBSA’s role in trade facilitation supports jobs and growth and helps keep Canada competitive in an evolving global economy.

This 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities of the CBSA provides information on how the Agency will support the Government on achieving our agenda in the coming year and I am fully confident that the CBSA is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year’s report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government’s progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, the CBSA’s reports to Parliament will focus more transparently on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow our Department’s progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister’s mandate letter to me.

I am very proud to have been appointed Minister responsible for the CBSA.  The organization has a strong reputation for vigilance and service, and I’m confident it will carry that record forward in the coming year.

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Linda Lizotte-MacPherson

Ministerial Portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling Instruments: Canada Border Services Agency Act; Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 2003

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border.

Responsibilities

The CBSA is an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which is responsible for integrated national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border management operations. Specific responsibilities of the CBSA include the following:

  • administering legislation that governs the admissibility of people and goods into and out of Canada;
  • identifying, detaining, and removing people who are inadmissible to Canada;
  • interdicting illegal goods at Canada’s border;
  • protecting food safety, plant and animal health, and Canada’s resource base;
  • administering trade legislation and agreements, including the enforcement of trade remedies that protect Canadian industry;
  • administering a fair and impartial redress mechanism; and
  • collecting duties and taxes on imported goods.
Examples of Acts Administered by the CBSA
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Canada Border Services Agency Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Customs Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Food and Drug Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Special Import Measures Act
CBSA Service Locations

The CBSA provides services at multiple points across Canada and abroad, including the following:

  • 117 land border crossings
  • 71 sufferance warehouses
  • 27 rail offices
  • 226 airports
  • 426 marine reporting sites
  • 12 ferry terminals
  • 10 cruise ship operations
  • 217 commercial vessel clearance facilities
  • 3 international mail processing centres
  • 47 international offices
  • 56 inland offices

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.
    • 1.1 Program: Risk Assessment
      • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Intelligence
      • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Targeting
      • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Security Screening
    • 1.2 Program: Secure and Trusted Partnerships
      • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Trusted Traveller
      • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Trusted Trader
    • 1.3 Program: Admissibility Determination
      • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Highway Mode
      • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Air Mode
      • 1.3.3 Sub-Program: Rail Mode
      • 1.3.4 Sub-Program: Marine Mode
      • 1.3.5 Sub-Program: Postal
      • 1.3.6 Sub-Program: Courier Low Value Shipment
    • 1.4 Program: Criminal Investigations
    • 1.5 Program: Immigration Enforcement
      • 1.5.1 Sub-Program: Immigration Investigations
      • 1.5.2 Sub-Program: Detentions
      • 1.5.3 Sub-Program: Immigration Hearings
      • 1.5.4 Sub-Program: Removals
    • 1.6 Program: Recourse
    • 1.7 Program: Revenue and Trade Management
      • 1.7.1 Sub-Program: Anti-dumping and Countervailing
      • 1.7.2 Sub-Program: Trade Policy
      • 1.7.3 Sub-Program: Trade Compliance
    • Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority: Secure the Border Strategically

Changes in traveller patterns and increasing commercial volumes give rise to new and evolving border-related risks such as handguns and assault weapons entering Canada, terrorism, contraband concealment methods, and the spread of infectious diseases. At the heart of this challenge is the need to continue focusing the CBSA’s energy and resources on travellers and goods that are of the highest risk, while facilitating the legitimate flow of goods and people into Canada. Strategically securing Canada’s borders involves the use of high-quality information that integrates CBSA’s intelligence gathering and analytics activities with enforcement statistics to manage border-related risks. It requires focussing the Agency’s resources on high-risk people and goods entering or leaving Canada. By “pushing the border out,” the CBSA can leverage cutting-edge technology and advanced analytics to improve the Agency’s capacity to assess risks as early as possible. Securing the border also involves continued collaboration with the Agency’s counterparts in the United States, including Customs and Border Protection and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Through the Beyond the Border Action Plan the CBSA has collaborated with its US counterpart agencies to strengthen border security between both countries and promote economic prosperity by making border processes more effective and efficient.

Priority TypeFootnote1

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to  Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

eManifest

June 2009 December 2016 1.1 - Risk Assessment
1.2.2 - Trusted Trader
1.3.1 - Highway Mode
1.3.2 - Air Mode
1.3.3 - Rail Mode
1.3.4 - Marine Mode
1.3.5 - Postal
1.3.6 - Courier Low Value Shipment

Interactive Advance Passenger Information

November 2015 To be determined 1.1.1 - Intelligence

NEXUS

June 2009 To be determined 1.3.1 - Highway Mode
1.3.2 - Air Mode
1.3.4 - Marine Mode

Entry/Exit

To be determined Phases 2012-2017 1.1.1 - Intelligence

Refugee Reform

November 2012 To be determined 1.1.3 - Security Screening
1.3 - Admissibility Determination
1.4 - Criminal Investigations
1.5 - Immigration Enforcement

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website. Footnotei

Streamline and Simplify the Border Experience

Advances in electronic technology, the use of biometric information, and the implementation of client-focused, self-service kiosks and portals continue to bring great benefits to border management helping the CBSA to quickly process travellers and get goods to their destination faster. On the other hand, technological advances may pose new challenges in the future, such as cyber-threats to critical border infrastructure. By streamlining and simplifying the border experience, the CBSA leverages technology such as advanced screening and risk assessment programs to minimize delays and enable automated passage for low-risk travellers and goods while allowing the Agency to focus on those that represent the highest risks.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to  Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management

January 2016 Mach 2020 1.7 – Revenue and Trade Management

NEXUS

June 2009 To be determined 1.3.1 – Highway Mode
1.3.2 – Air Mode
1.3.4 – Marine Mode

Radio Frequency Identification Technology

To be determined March 2017 1.3.1 – Highway Mode

Postal Modernization

April 2014 Q1 2015-16 1.1 – Risk Assessment

Courier Low Value Shipments

To be determined Q1 2019-20 1.1 – Risk Assessment
1.3.6 – Courier Low Value Shipment
Priority: Advance Global Border Management

Advancing global border management entails working with partners in the international community to further Canada’s interests in border facilitation and security. It means harmonizing processes to expedite national and international trade and travel. It also means working with border and customs organizations around the world to address shared issues and to “push the border out” by assessing risks earlier in the traveller and commercial continuums. The CBSA will continue to partner with U.S. Customs and Border Protection on shared interests, such as implementation of the Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives and intercepting prohibited handguns and assault weapons before they reach Canadian communities. The CBSA will also pursue this priority through strategic engagement with international organizations (e.g., Border management intelligence agencies, the World Customs Organization and World Trade Organization), and negotiation of bilateral and multilateral agreements to improve security and service delivery.

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives

Planned  Initiatives

Start Date

End Date

Link to  Department’s Program Alignment Architecture

Mutual Recognition Arrangements with the European Union, Israel and Mexico

To be determined

March 2017

1.2.2 - Trusted Trader

Advanced Passenger Information/Passenger Name Record

To be determined

To be determined

1.1.1 - Intelligence
1.3.2 - Air Mode

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Business Travel Card

To be determined

To be determined

1.2.1 - Trusted Traveller

Priority: Strengthen Organizational Resilience

The CBSA relies on its engaged, high-performing workforce, modern business processes and the strategic use of information technology to achieve its goals. Adapting to a changing operating environment in times of fiscal restraint requires efficient and effective use of the Agency’s resources. The CBSA is shifting its day-to-day activities from primarily processing transactions, to more intelligence-based activities informed by risk assessments and performance results. This shift requires investing in modern infrastructure, recruiting and developing employees with advanced analytical skills, and supporting management excellence. It also requires using innovative information technologies to provide the necessary performance information for strategic and frontline decision-making, advanced analytics and enhanced client service, resulting in more effective management of border-related risks. This shift is supported by the CBSA People Strategy, the Agency’s plan to enable a skilled and high-performing work force, as well as strategies to address mental health (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder and depression).

Priority Type

Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned  Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to  Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
Border Infrastructure Project Plan September 2015 March 2019 Admissibility Determination
CBSA People Strategy May 2015 To be determined Internal Services

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Terrorist Activities

The risk that individuals/groups with links to terrorism, or materials to support terrorist activities, will enter, exit, or transit Canada.

  • Develop and implement Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) initiatives, designed to collect passenger information earlier in the traveller continuum to allow the CBSA to effectively screen and enhance risk assessment activities and to issue board/no-board messages for all travellers and crew members flying to Canada prior to departure
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination

Contraband

The risk that commercial quantities of contraband will enter or transit Canada.

  • Collaborate with industry to build, outfit and staff two new Marine Container Examination Facilities (MCEFs), including deployment of new detection technology and procedures, to increase examination capacity
  • Work towards the full implementation of eManifest, which will require importers to electronically provide Advance Commercial Information (ACI) to the CBSA prior to arrival and within prescribed mode-specific time frames
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination

Food, Plant and Animal (FPA)

The risk that plant pests, invasive alien species, unsafe food, and/or plant and animal diseases will enter Canada.

  • Maintain work with industry to build, outfit and staff two new MCEFs, including deployment of new detection technology and procedures, to increase examination capacity
  • Continue to work towards the full implementation of eManifest, which will require importers to electronically provide ACI to the CBSA prior to arrival and within prescribed mode-specific time frames
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination

The Agency operates in a complex and dynamic environment, where the exposure to risk is often driven largely by factors beyond its control. Ensuring plans mitigate key risks allows the CBSA to secure the border strategically, streamline and simplify the border experience, and advance global border management.
The above table identifies three of the Agency’s top external risks, as evaluated by senior management and found in the CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile, the Agency’s overarching, enterprise-level risk document. The risk response strategies presented include activities that are planned for 2016-17 to help mitigate these risks. An overview of each risk is presented below.

The above table identifies three of the Agency’s top external risks, as evaluated by senior management and found in the CBSA Enterprise Risk Profile, the Agency’s overarching, enterprise-level risk document. The risk response strategies presented include activities that are planned for 2016-17 to help mitigate these risks. An overview of each risk is presented below.

Descriptions of Key Risks:

Terrorist Activities: Terrorism is recognized as a national security threat as Canada has been identified as a target by certain extremist groups, such as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Collaboration with international bilateral and multilateral partners, the overseas detection work by CBSA liaison officers and the capacity building activities by different CBSA areas, heightened screening by CBSA personnel in collaboration with Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), as well as improved risk assessment capacity as a result of the implementation of the National Targeting Centre are a few of the controls mitigating the Terrorist Activities risk. The Paris attacks in November 2015 and the attacks in San Bernardino, California, are a recent example of why there is a constant need for vigilance.

Contraband: Over the past two decades, organized crime such as drug and currency trafficking, and the illegal movement of firearms, tobacco and vehicles has become increasingly sophisticated, such as new designer drugs appearing frequently, which presents enforcement challenges as it reaches beyond national jurisdictions. Ongoing collaboration with law enforcement partners at home and abroad, the use of automated targeting systems, and the work accomplished by a variety of enforcement teams are examples of ways the Agency controls its exposure to the Contraband risk. For instance, the ongoing modernization of the Postal Program, coupled with the targeting of higher value shipments, has resulted in a significant increase in the value of seizures in recent years. This is a clear indicator that the Contraband risk continues to be considerable, and that the Agency will require a continuation of efforts to mitigate this trend.

Food, Plant and Animals: The speed and ease with which travel and trade move around the globe has increased Canada’s vulnerability to FPA-related threats. The economic and ecological impacts resulting from the introduction of dangerous FPA commodities to Canada could be considerable. External factors such as the oversight capacity of other countries and the high volumes of cargo drive the exposure to this risk. While continued cooperation with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency helps to ensure threats are identified and understood, the Agency faces challenges with its examination capacity for FPA in commercial streams.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

1,673,039,553

1,673,039,553

1,663,192,046

1,579,940,267

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

13,565

13,479

13,442

 

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services

2013-14
Expenditures

2014-15
Expenditures

2015-16
Forecast Spending*

2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks

1.1. Risk Assessment

167,659,404

181,814,888

184,678,387

162,510,532

162,510,532

160,945,408

157,316,340

1.2. Secure and Trusted Partnerships

40,998,175

42,228,468

34,823,000

35,243,046

35,243,046

35,170,050

32,124,101

1.3. Admissibility Determination

816,408,042

982,394,090

897,812,947

901,059,087

901,059,087

913,327,832

837,161,162

1.4. Criminal Investigations

31,415,641

37,290,323

30,388,209

33,348,629

33,348,629

26,078,277

26,078,277

1.5. Immigration Enforcement

173,297,292

186,711,928

154,524,671

128,654,073

128,654,073

129,072,690

129,072,690

1.6. Recourse

11,919,916

13,359,832

11,870,923

11,485,183

11,485,183

11,485,877

11,485,877

1.7. Revenue and Trade Management

90,169,773

88,403,795

85,443,865

80,336,485

80,336,485

68,042,143

68,042,143

Subtotal

1,331,868,243

1,532,203,324

1,399,542,002

1,352,637,035

1,352,637,035

1,344,122,277

1,261,280,590

Internal Services Subtotal

518,243,259

468,941,046

411,856,813

320,402,518

320,402,518

319,069,769

318,659,677

Total

1,850,111,502

2,001,144,370

1,811,398,815

1,673,039,553

1,673,039,553

1,663,192,046

1,579,940,267

In the previous two reporting cycles, the CBSA committed to reporting at the Sub-Program level beginning in the 2016-17 RPP, following the implementation of the new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA). Due to factors beyond the Agency’s control (such as the caretaker convention pursuant to the 2015 Federal election), decisions relating to changes to PAA were deferred for all departments to the next fiscal year. Therefore, once the new PAA has been approved, the CBSA will begin reporting at the lowest level accordingly.

The 2015-16 forecasted spending ($1,811.4 million) is slightly higher than the authorities approved in the 2015-16 Main Estimates ($1,774.2 million). This is mainly attributed to the Agency currently taking into account the costs associated to paylist expenditures as well as the spending related to the resettlement of Syrian refugees. It is anticipated that these additional authorities will be received by the end of the fiscal year.

The 2016-17 Main Estimates of $1,673.0 million represents a decrease of $101.2 million or 5.7% from the 2015-16 Main Estimates of $1,774.2 million. The net decrease in the Main Estimates is primarily due to the completion of initiatives such as Arming and the planned reduction of funding for major initiatives included in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Beginning in 2016-17, the planned spending is expected to decrease and stabilize in 2018-19 due to the completion of several major project milestones.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars) Footnoteii
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016-17
Planned Spending

International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks

Risk Assessment International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 162,510,532
Secure and Trusted Partnerships International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 35,243,046
Admissibility Determination Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada
901,059,087
Criminal Investigations Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada
33,348,629
Immigration Enforcement Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada
128,654,073
Recourse Economic Affairs A safe and secure Canada A fair and secure marketplace
11,485,183
Revenue and Trade Management Economic Affairs A fair and secure marketplace
80,336,485

 

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending

Economic affairs

91,821,668

Social affairs

1,063,061,789

International affairs

197,753,578

Departmental Spending Trend

Overall, the Agency’s expenditures are declining and are anticipated to stabilize beginning in 2017-2018. The decrease in spending is primarily due to the completion and implementation of several large projects and delivering on core commitments set out in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

Expenditures in 2014-2015 are the exception since the Agency incurred additional expenditures for the one-time transitional payment as the Government moved to a pay-in-arrears pay system, and the one-time severance payout for the recently signed collective agreement for Border Services Officers (BSOs).

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

  2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 9,886 1,325 3,520 0
Statutory 187,287 188,723 182,608 184,712 183,503 182,142
Voted 1,662,825 1,812,421 1,618,905 1,487,003 1,476,169 1,397,798
Total 1,850,112 2,001,144 1,811,399 1,673,040 1,663,192 1,579,940

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CBSA’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2016-17 Main Estimates Footnoteiii.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome:

International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada’s border and Canada’s population is protected from border-related risks

Program 1.1: Risk Assessment

Description

The Risk Assessment program "pushes the border out" by seeking to identify high‑risk people, goods and conveyances as early as possible in the travel and trade continuum to prevent inadmissible people and goods from entering Canada. This benefits the travelling public and the trade community by enabling the Agency to focus its examination and interdiction activities on high‑risk people and goods, thereby facilitating the entry of low‑risk travellers and goods. The Agency uses a variety of threat and risk assessment methodologies, intelligence and supporting technologies to identify potential risks to the security and safety of people and goods.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

162,510,532

162,510,532

160,945,408

157,316,340

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

1,085

1,087

1,053

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Potential threats to the safety and security of Canada, such as inadmissible goods and people, are identified, assessed and intercepted prior to arrival/departure.

Percentage of threats that led to an enforcement action or inadmissibility recommendation

18.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to modernize the Agency’s tools to manage risks at the earliest point in the travel and trade streams

In 2016-17, the CBSA will continue to assess risks away from the border by targeting high-risk travellers and goods as early as possible in the trade and travel streams. The Agency continues to focus on examining high-risk people and goods while ensuring low-risk travellers and goods are efficiently processed. To support these intelligence and enforcement activities, the Agency will continue with the implementation of eManifest, a transformational initiative. eManifest enhances the safety and security of Canada’s trade chain by requiring, through proposed regulations,  all carriers, freight forwarders and importers in all modes of transportation to electronically transmit Advance Commercial Information (ACI) to the CBSA. This information allows the CBSA to conduct pre-arrival risk assessments of goods into Canada and resulting in more effective enforcement activities. In 2016-17, this will include onboarding and client testing for new notices, issuing compliance requirements for carriers and freight forwarders, and drafting of a second regulatory amendment package to support the extension of ACI to importers in all modes through Advance Trade Data requirements.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Intelligence

Description

The Intelligence Program collects, analyzes and distributes actionable intelligence regarding people, goods, shipments or conveyances bound for or leaving Canada to the CBSA and other law enforcement partners identify people, goods, shipments or conveyances that may be inadmissible or pose a threat to the security of Canada. Agency officers located within Canada, at ports of embarkation or at posts abroad assess information collected from a wide range of sources. In addition, the CBSA provides timely, accurate, strategic, operational and tactical intelligence advice to government authorities, like‑minded counterpart nations and stakeholders related to threats to national security, including information on terrorism, weapons proliferation, war crimes, organized crime, smuggling, immigration fraud and irregular migration, fraudulent documentation and border enforcement. Intelligence products such as lookouts, alerts, scientific reports and threat and risk assessments inform, support and enhance the Agency's screening and targeting capabilities and other CBSA programs (such as Admissibility Determination, Criminal Investigations and Immigration Enforcement). A lookout is reliable, accurate and actionable intelligence on actual or suspected infractions or criminal activities that may result in the interception of inadmissible people. A lookout takes the form of an electronic file record. A lookout "hit" will "flag" or identify particular individuals, including corporations, and specific goods, conveyances or shipments. A lookout "hit" requires a mandatory referral to a secondary examination.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Reliable, accurate and actionable information and intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible people.

The percentage of CBSA Liaison Officer recommendations to airlines leading to interceptions of improperly documented travellers prior to their arrival by air to Canada, measured against improperly documented arrivals to Canada

70.00%

March 2017

Reliable, accurate and actionable information and intelligence resulting in the interception of inadmissible goods, shipments and/or conveyances.

Ratio of the value of intelligence led seizures to the value of non-intelligence led seizures

9:1

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Ensure the Intelligence Program continues to support the CBSA’s enforcement priorities

The CBSA continues to work with its stakeholders in law enforcement and national security to improve intelligence-specific measures while maintaining close collaboration with federal partners as the Agency contributes to broader Government of Canada intelligence priorities. In 2016-17, the Agency’s advancement of key technologies and processes, such as IAPI and Entry/Exit, will enhance file management, including the ability to “flag” and identify particular threats through enhanced performance reporting of intelligence, and non-intelligence, led seizures.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Targeting

Description

The Targeting Program identifies people and goods bound for Canada that may pose a threat to the security and safety of the country. The CBSA uses a number of automated advance information sources from carriers and importers to identify people, goods and conveyances that may pose a threat to Canada. Advance Passenger Information and ACI provide the CBSA with electronic pre-arrival information on people and goods that can be used to perform risk assessments in advance of their arrival in Canada. Known threats are identified when there is a match against an enforcement database entry. People and goods that are identified as posing a threat to Canada are referred for verification and examination upon their arrival at a POE.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Air passengers that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival.

Average percentage of air passengers targeted for examination that led to a result

25.00%

March 2017

Marine containers and contents that pose a threat to the security and safety of Canada are identified prior to their arrival.

Percentage of marine containers targeted for contraband and FPA examination that yielded a result

1.50%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance the screening of travellers prior to their departure for Canada by using a common approach  

In 2016−17, the CBSA will continue to enhance its traveller targeting program by supporting the future phases of the IAPI to receive advance information prior to a flight’s departure to Canada. The Agency will continue to work with its international counterparts to support the ratification of the Agreement between Canada and the European Community on the Processing of Advance Passenger Information and Passenger Name Record Data. It will also align with the U.S., by establishing a common approach to pre-departure screening using IRCC’s new Electronic Travel Authorization to screen visa-exempt travellers prior to boarding flights destined for Canada

In addition, in 2016−17, the Agency will continue to develop the predictive analytics model, providing the CBSA with another tool for conducting risk assessments in the traveller stream.

Key Commitment: Continue the implementation of the Targeting Business Model in the commercial stream

In 2016-2017, the CBSA will focus on developing a detailed implementation plan for centralizing rail and highway targeting. Focused on eliminating duplication of effort, addressing existing gaps, eliminating a multi-tier approach to targeting and improving national consistency in program delivery, the Model will further improve the Targeting Program by centralizing and better integrating critical activities used to identify people, goods and/or conveyances posing threats to Canadians.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Security Screening

Description

The Security Screening Program is responsible for the security screening of foreign nationals who have been referred to the CBSA by an IRCC visa officer abroad or in Canada, who are seeking to come to Canada as a permanent resident, temporary resident (e.g., visitor) or refugee, or are already in Canada and seeking to remain as a temporary or permanent resident.

The CBSA is responsible for ensuring that there are no security concerns related to the individual seeking entry to Canada (e.g., counter-terrorism, counter-espionage, war crimes, crimes against humanity and organized crime) and, based on a thorough screening exercise (including the review of information and intelligence from a wide variety of internal and external sources), makes a recommendation to IRCC on the admissibility of the individual. This program is also responsible for determining the admissibility of senior diplomats being posted to Ottawa to ensure that they meet the admissibility requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Persons who may be a national security concern are found to be inadmissible to Canada.

*National Security Screening includes cases pertaining to sections 34, 35 and/or 37 of the IRPA.

Percentage of all non-favourable CBSA recommendations to IRCC relating to Permanent Residents that result in a finding of inadmissibility

*Includes refusals under other sections of the Act and remedies to overcome inadmissibility

80.00%

March 2017

Percentage of all non-favourable CBSA recommendations to IRCC relating to Temporary Residents that result in a finding of inadmissibility

*Includes refusals under other sections of the Act and remedies to overcome inadmissibility (PPTRV and TRP)

95.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to work with the Government of Canada Security Screening partners to improve processes and better mitigate risks

The CBSA is committed to continue working with the Government of Canada’s security screening partners, including IRCC, the RCMP, CSIS and others, to improve processes and the mitigation of risks. In collaboration with these other governmental departments, the Agency works towards facilitating the admissibility process for individuals and admitting low-risk travellers into Canada.

In 2016-17, the CBSA will identify the inadmissibility training gaps, and address these gaps by prioritizing course development for officers. The Agency will continue to improve the performance measurement for the Security Screening Program to ensure the CBSA is providing effective security screening advice to IRCC. The Agency will also administer a Quality Assurance survey with IRCC to ensure the CBSA’s security screening work continues to meet their needs. Results will be analyzed and an action plan will be developed in order to address any issues, as required.

Program 1.2: Secure and Trusted Partnerships

Description

Through the Secure and Trusted Partnerships Program, the CBSA works closely with clients, other government departments and international border management partners to enhance trade chain and traveller security while providing pre-approved, low-risk travellers and traders with streamlined and efficient border processes. The CBSA develops and administers programs and cooperative agreements with its partners to ensure alignment with international standards (e.g., the World Customs Organization (WCO) SAFE Framework of Standards) and promote best practices in global border management. By increasing membership in trusted traveller and trader programs, the CBSA is able to improve its capacity to mitigate risk in advance and focus examination efforts on identifying travellers and traders of unknown or higher risk.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

35,243,046

35,243,046

35,170,050

32,124,101

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

363

363

363

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Capacity to focus on high-risk people and goods at ports of entry is increased.

 

Percentage increase in trusted traveller programs membership from previous fiscal year

*An increase in trusted travellers will result in a decrease of unknown or high risk travellers, thereby allowing BSOs to focus more on the latter group of travellers

12.00%

March 2017

Number of approved memberships from total applications to Trusted Trader Program.

80.00

March 2017

Average time savings for NEXUS members at land Port of Entry (POE) (average processing time in NEXUS lanes versus conventional lanes) in seconds

*Processing time is the time elapsed from the initiation of the licence plate reader until the release/referral decision is entered into the system

5 seconds

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to enhance the benefits of programs that help trusted travellers move efficiently across the border, including the expansion of trusted traveller programs to eligible countries

The Agency’s modernization efforts will continue to support the flow of goods and people into Canada through the implementation of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. In 2016-17, the CBSA will enhance the benefits of trusted programs, such as NEXUS and Free and Secure Trade (FAST), which help trusted businesses and travellers move efficiently across the border. Over the course of the year, the CBSA will increase international membership in NEXUS, allowing for more pre-approved low risk travellers by expanding trusted traveller programs to various eligible countries. In support of this, the Agency will leverage international relationships with other border management agencies to promote traveller facilitation and security. The CBSA will continue to work to implement a trilateral trusted traveller arrangement with the U.S. and Mexico, while working with both countries towards streamlining customs procedures and harmonizing data requirements for traders.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Trusted Traveller

Description

The Trusted Traveller Programs are designed to simplify the border clearance process for pre-approved, low-risk travellers entering Canada. The CBSA offers two programs for travellers, NEXUS and CANPASS. These programs streamline (expedite and simplify) border clearance. NEXUS is a joint initiative with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in the air, land and marine modes of transportation, while CANPASS is a Canadian suite of programs for clients entering Canada by plane, corporate and private aircrafts, and private boats. Both programs are available to citizens or permanent residents of Canada and/or the U.S. and enable members to cross the border faster when travelling to Canada and, in the case of NEXUS, when travelling to the U.S.

Applicants to the programs must pass various assessments (e.g., security checks, interviews and risk assessments) specific to the program before being granted membership. NEXUS and CANPASS Air members can use iris recognition technology for passage processing at designated airports, and NEXUS members can use Radio Frequency Identification technology for processing at designated highway ports of entry. Members of NEXUS or the CANPASS Private Boat, CANPASS Corporate Aircraft or CANPASS Private Aircraft programs entering Canada by private aircraft, corporate aircraft or private boat must report their arrival in advance and make their declarations to the CBSA Telephone Reporting Centre.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Border clearance is streamlined and expedited.

Percentage of Trusted Traveller Programs applications processed within 30 business days upon receipt of a complete application out of all completed Trusted Traveller Program applications received

95.00%

March 2017

Trusted travellers are low-risk.

Percentage of Trusted Traveller members examined who are found to be in compliance with border legislation, regulations and program criteria

97.00% or more

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to strengthen international relationships and build on the benefits offered to participants of trusted traveller programs

In 2016-17, the Agency will move forward with its implementation of the Beyond the Border Action Plan by working with international partners. The Agency will continue to replace aging NEXUS equipment as well as relocate NEXUS highway lanes to accommodate infrastructure expansions and port rebuilds. More specifically, the CBSA will replace aging NEXUS highway lane equipment at the following seven ports of entry (Ambassador Bridge, Windsor, ON; Blue Water Bridge, Sarnia, ON; Peace Bridge, Fort Erie, ON;  Douglas, BC; and Lacolle, QC) as well as relocate NEXUS highway lanes at the Sault Ste. Marie, ON and Lacolle, QC ports of entry. Lastly, building off the preliminary results of the NEXUS electronic gate (eGate) pilot at the Peace Bridge in Fort Erie, Ontario, the Agency will assess the results of the pilot and determine the way forward.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Trusted Trader

Description

The Trusted Trader Program simplifies many of the border requirements for pre-approved, low risk participants so that shipments can be processed more quickly and efficiently at the border. Importers approved under the Customs Self Assessment (CSA) benefit from a streamlined accounting and payment process as well as an expedited clearance option for qualified goods. Members of the Partners in Protection program benefit from enhanced supply chain security as well as lowered examination rates. In addition, members of these Trusted Trader Programs have the option of utilizing the FAST lanes to transport eligible imported goods into Canada. FAST is a joint initiative between the CBSA and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

To become a member of the Trusted Trader Programs, applicants must undergo an in depth risk assessment. Once granted membership, CSA importers can use their own business systems and processes to forward trade data to the CBSA and remit payment of duties and taxes through their own financial institutions. In addition, CSA importers can also apply for trade compliance benefits which allow approved importers the flexibility to completely self-assess and audit their revenue reporting and trade requirements.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Impact of border processing on trusted programs members is minimized.

Percentage of Trusted Trader shipments examined at border

Less than 1.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to strengthen international relationships and build on the benefits offered to participants of trusted trader programs

The CBSA will continue to play its important facilitation role in international trade by working with international partners to facilitate trade. In 2016-17, the CBSA will continue Customs Mutual Recognition Arrangement negotiations with the European Union, Israel and Mexico. The Agency will also develop further enhancements to the Trusted Trader Portal, and continue to harmonize the Partners in Protection (PIP) program with the United States Customs and Border Protection’s Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism program in the areas of policy, procedures and processing practices. (PIP is a voluntary commercial security program that creates partnerships between the CBSA and companies that are directly involved in cross-border trade. It enlists the cooperation of private industry to enhance border and trade chain security, combat organized crime and terrorism and help detect and prevent contraband smuggling. Member companies are recognized as being trusted traders, which allows the CBSA to focus its resources on areas of higher or unknown risk.) In 2016-17, the CBSA will also introduce a new dedicated FAST lane and booth at Fort Erie and modify the current FAST infrastructure at Pacific Highway, as part of its commitment to infrastructure enhancement.  

Program 1.3: Admissibility Determination

Description

Through the Admissibility Determination program, the CBSA develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships that enable BSOs to intercept people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada and to process legitimate people and goods seeking entry into Canada within established service standards. In addition, the Agency develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships to control the export of goods from Canada.

In the traveller stream, BSOs question people upon arrival to determine if they and their personal goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Border services officers will then make a decision to grant entry or refer a person for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document), and/or for a physical examination.

In the commercial stream, carriers and importers are required to provide information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers review the status of pre arrival decisions and/or the provided accompanying documentation to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Based on this determination, a border services officer may refer the goods for further processing, examination and/or scientific/engineering analysis. Upon further examination goods may be seized, released or penalties imposed.

With some exceptions, all goods being exported from Canada must be reported "in writing" to the CBSA.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

901,059,087

901,059,087

913,327,832

837,161,162

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

7,687

7,686

7,687

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

People and goods who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at ports of entry.

Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible.

3.20%

March 2017

Percentage of imported commercial goods examined that result in seizure action in the marine, highway, air and rail modes of importation

0.05%

March 2017

People entering Canada for the purposes of legitimate travel at a land POE are processed within established service standards.

Percentage of people reaching the primary inspection booth within the service standard (10 minutes on weekdays; 20 minutes on weekends and holidays)

95.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Facilitate the admissibility of Syrian refugees by working collaboratively with IRCC and other government departments

As part of the Agency’s efforts to support legitimate travel into Canada, the CBSA will continue to work closely with its federal and international partners to welcome 25,000 Syrian refugees. Canada will work with the governments of Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, along with international and Canadian partners to facilitate this re-settlement. This includes working with counterparts at Canadian missions and embassies abroad to process and security screen refugee applications before coming into Canada. Upon arrival, the Agency will finalize the verification of identity and screen for signs of illness ensuring the safety, security and health of Canadians and refugees.

Key Commitment: Transform the CBSA commercial programs in order to modernize and bring efficiencies to the processing of commercial goods

In 2016-17, the Agency, in consultation with key internal and external stakeholders, will develop a roadmap to achieve the Beyond 2020: Commercial Vision to support the transformation and evolution of its commercial programs. The Commercial Vision provides a strategic framework and action plan that will enable the CBSA to transform the Commercial Program towards a more efficient and innovative border management model which balances benefits to trade with enforcement responsibilities. In addition, to address future needs of the CBSA’s export program, the Agency will continue to develop the export system requirements for the replacement of the Canadian Automated Export Declaration system which maintains access to the electronic reporting option that is widely used by the trade community.

Program 1.3.1: Highway Mode

Description

The Highway Program identifies and intercepts inadmissible people and goods seeking entry to Canada at 117 designated land ports of entry while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards. Border services officers conduct interviews of persons and drivers of commercial carriers and then make a decision to allow the entry of a person or shipment or refer them for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) and/or examination (e.g., physical search of a vehicle, further investigation of admissibility).

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods, and carriers and exporters are required to report their goods.

Examinations may be performed with the use of specialized tools (e.g., gamma ray imaging Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System, ion scanners and detector dogs) and may include a full or partial offload of the goods to detect the presence of prohibited or restricted goods (e.g., narcotics or weapons). People and/or goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty, seizure or denied entry to Canada.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

People who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at land ports of entry.

Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at highway ports. (includes rail)

4.00%

March 2017

Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at a highway POE.

Percentage of people examined at a highway POE who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA

1.30%

March 2017

Percentage of imported commercial goods examined in the highway mode that result in seizure action

0.02%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to enhance client service along the Canada-U.S. border

Canada and the U.S. have committed to continue to facilitate the movement of cross-border people and goods through investments in technology, like Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. In 2015-16,  the Agency began installing RFID technology and will assess the feasibility of implementing this technology at additional ports of entry across Canada. Additionally, the Agency will further its border modernization efforts for the Highway mode by delivering infrastructure projects at key POEs in British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Program 1.3.2: Air Mode

Description

The Air Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at designated airports while ensuring that legitimate people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Upon arrival, BSOs conduct interviews of persons seeking entry into Canada, aided by electronic pre arrival risk assessment information submitted by the airlines. CBSA officers make a decision to admit the person or refer them for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) or examination.
For private and corporate aircraft and general aviation traffic reporting through the Telephone Reporting Centre, various checks are conducted by means of the telephone reporting system. Border services officers make a decision to admit people or refer them for further processing or examination.

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods, and carriers and exporters are required to report their goods. More specifically, air carriers are required to submit electronic pre-arrival information related to their goods for import. Those goods meeting the requirements of border-related legislation are released at the airport or at a designated sufferance warehouse, while those goods identified as being potentially inadmissible are held for an examination.

To assist BSOs in their examinations, detection tools such as detector dogs and ion scanners may be used. People and goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty, seizure or denied entry to Canada.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

People and their goods that are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at air POEs.

Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at air POE

3.54%

March 2017

Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at air POEs.

Percentage of people examined at air POE who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA.

1.60%

March 2017

Percentage of imported commercial goods examined that result in seizure action in the air mode

0.07%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Advance work on a “universal” kiosk to replace all existing primary kiosks

In 2016-17, as part of the Agency’s Border Modernization initiatives, CBSA will build and begin deploying the next generation of primary kiosks and automate the E311 Declaration Card. The “universal” kiosks will further automate border processing, reducing costs and saving time, and will replace existing primary kiosks, including ABC, NEXUS and CANPASS kiosks. Automation of the E311 Declaration Card will enable travelers to declare in advance, reducing the need for paper-based declarations and the paper burden associated with it, while enhancing document and identity verification.

Program 1.3.3: Rail Mode

Description

The Rail Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at a rail POE or rail yard while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Rail operators are required to report train, passenger and/or cargo information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers may conduct onboard interviews of travellers seeking entry into Canada upon arrival at the border to determine their admissibility or whether further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document) or examination (e.g., physical search of baggage, further investigation of admissibility) is required.

In the commercial stream, BSOs review the electronic information submitted by the rail carrier and the importer/exporter, and make a decision to release the cargo or refer it for an examination at the rail yard.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at rail POE.

Percentage of people examined  at rail POE who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA

1.00%

March 2017

Percentage of imported commercial goods examined that result in seizure action in the rail mode

0.01%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance the Rail Program

In 2016-17, the Agency will address recommendations from an internal audit related to the commercial rail mode. To enhance its ability to carry out its mandate in commercial rail mode and respond to the recommendations, the Agency will focus on strengthening governance, identifying and prioritizing risk, strengthening internal controls and completing a management controls framework.

Program 1.3.4: Marine Mode

Description

The Marine Program identifies and intercepts people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada seeking entry at a marine POE, while ensuring that admissible people and goods are processed within established service standards.

Prior to arrival in the traveller stream, BSOs receive information regarding the passengers and crew aboard cruise ships, ferries, tour boats, private small vessels in the Trusted Traveller Program and commercial vessels. At large cruise ship offices and certain ferry terminals, passengers are processed using Integrated Primary Inspection Line. For those private vessels reporting through the Telephone Reporting Centre, various checks are conducted by means of the telephone reporting system. Border services officers make decisions to admit people or refer them for further processing or examination.

In the commercial stream, importers are required to account for their goods. Carriers and exporters are required to report their goods; marine carriers are required to submit advance electronic information for imports and have the option for exports. To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as Remote Operated Vehicles and the Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System are used. In major ports, 100 percent of marine containers are scanned for the presence of radiological material using radiation portals. People and goods that are found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to enforcement action which may include a monetary penalty, seizure, or being denied entry to Canada.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

People who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at marine POE.

Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible at a marine POE

2.06%

March 2017

Goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted at marine POE.

Percentage of people examined at a marine POE who are found to be in possession of goods that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA

1.30%

March 2017

Percentage of imported commercial goods examined at the first point of arrival that result in seizure action in the marine mode

0.13%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Maintain work to advance upgrades to Marine Container Examination Facilities

In 2016-17, the Agency will continue to work with industry partners and the Port Authority in Vancouver to advance the MCEF project, which will increase the Agency's examination capacity and enhance the facilitation of legitimate trade. This will also include the implementation of detection technology and the development of new examination procedures to more efficiently mitigate marine-related risks.

Key Commitment: Continue to work to address threats of narcotics smuggling and illegal migration involving private vessels 

In 2016-17, the Agency will continue its work with stakeholders to perform joint initiatives that will address narcotics smuggling and illegal migration involving private vessels.

Program 1.3.5: Postal

Description

The Postal Program identifies and intercepts international mail items valued at less than CAD$2,500 that are inadmissible to Canada while ensuring that admissible mail items are processed within established service standards, and applicable duties and taxes are assessed and collected. Mail items valued at CAD$2,500 or higher are processed in the regular commercial import stream.

The Postal Program operates at three CBSA Mail Centres in Canada. Border services officers conduct an inspection of international mail items to determine whether further processing (e.g., assessment and payment of duties and/or taxes) and/or a physical examination is required. Mail items that do not require CBSA intervention are released to Canada Post for delivery.

To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as X ray and detector dogs may be used. Mail items found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be seized on behalf of other government departments. Importers are advised of their appeal rights, and Canada Post is advised that the item has been taken from the mail stream. All other items that are deemed admissible, after examination, are released to Canada Post for delivery.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Mail that is non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA is intercepted at a Postal centre.

Percentage of examined international mail items that are seized

2.50%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to modernize the Postal program

The Agency’s modernization of Postal programs will help strengthen and secure the movement of international mail into Canada. In 2016-17, the CBSA will evaluate the operations of the Vancouver Mail Centre and examine the feasibility of applying similar approaches and lessons learned to the modernization of the Montreal and Toronto Mail Centres. In addition, the Agency will develop an e-commerce strategy to better manage the security and facilitation aspects of its mandate in order to keep pace with increasing postal volumes.

Program 1.3.6: Courier Low Value Shipment

Description

The Courier Low Value Shipment (LVS) Program identifies and intercepts courier importations that are inadmissible to Canada. The importations, conducted by approved courier participants, enter at designated sufferance warehouses. This provides a streamlined reporting, release and accounting process for most courier importations valued at less than CAD$2,500. Mail items valued at CAD$2,500 or higher are removed from the Program and processed in the regular commercial process.

To participate in the Courier LVS Program, a courier company must be pre-approved by the CBSA. Prior to the arrival of a courier shipment, the CBSA reviews the electronic information submitted by the courier to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of the Program and applicable legislation and/or if a physical examination is required. If a physical examination is required, the item is presented to a border services officer upon arrival. To assist officers in their examinations, detection tools such as targets and detector dogs may be used. Goods found to be in violation of the applicable legislation and/or regulations may be subject to a monetary penalty or seizure.

Performance Measurement

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Courier shipments that are non-compliant with legislation administered by the CBSA are intercepted.

Percentage of courier shipments examined that are seized

0.25%

March 2017

Percentage of courier shipments examined that are removed from the Courier LVS Program and transferred to the regular import stream because the goods were prohibited, restricted, controlled or non-compliant

7.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to develop and implement processes and systems to meet international standards.

In 2016-17, the CBSA will continue to incorporate the Courier LVS Program’s information into its risk assessment activities and facilitate the processing of low-value shipments with better data while maintaining the high security standards of the program. In addition, the Agency will develop an e-commerce strategy to better manage the security and facilitation aspects of its mandate in order to keep pace with increasing volumes.

Program 1.4: Criminal Investigations

Description

Under the Criminal Investigations program, the CBSA protects the integrity of border-related legislation and contributes to public safety and Canada's economic security by investigating and pursuing the prosecution of travellers, importers, exporters and/or other persons who commit criminal offences in contravention of Canada's border-related legislation.

CBSA investigators review potential border legislation violations and gather evidence using a variety of investigative techniques, including search warrants, production orders and digital forensic analysis. These violations include criminal offences under the Customs Act, IRPA, various food, plant and animal legislation, and other border-related legislation. In conjunction with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the CBSA pursues the prosecution of individuals or business entities who violate Canada's border-related legislation.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18*
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

33,348,629

33,348,629

26,078,277

26,078,277

*The reduction of planned spending between 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 is due to the sunset of funding for the implementation and administration of reforms to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program and International Mobility Program.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

338

304

304

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Crown counsel accepts referrals for prosecution prepared by CBSA.

Percentage of referrals for prosecution accepted by Crown

95.00%

March 2017

Individuals/businesses are convicted in order to punish and deter future contraventions.

Percentage of concluded prosecutions that result in a conviction

85.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue to strengthen the CBSA’s Criminal Investigations Program

Over the past year, the Agency made progress in developing an updated and enhanced Investigator Training Course for new Investigators. In 2016-17, building off the feedback received from course participants, the CBSA will continue to enhance and make improvements to the Investigator Training Course. In addition, the Agency will also continue its work ensuring alignment of its digital forensics capacity in support of enforcement and intelligence activities.

In addition, the Agency will continue to work with its partners in the criminal justice system, including the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, to ensure that the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights is fully integrated in criminal investigations regarding IRPA offences.

Program 1.5: Immigration Enforcement

Description

The Immigration Enforcement Program determines whether foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada are identified and investigated, detained, monitored and/or removed from Canada.

Foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada believed to be inadmissible are investigated and may have a report written against them by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Depending on the type of inadmissibility, the merits of the report are reviewed by either a Minister's Delegate or an independent decision maker at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) where a CBSA hearings officer represents the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Subsequent to this review, a removal order may be issued against the foreign national or permanent resident in question. Removal orders issued against refugee claimants are conditional and do not come into force until the claim against the removal order is abandoned, withdrawn or denied by the IRB.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

128,654,073

128,654,073

129,072,690

129,072,690

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

1,091

1,091

1,091

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Immigration enforcement actions are focused on high priority foreign nationals and permanent residents who may pose a safety and/or security risk to Canada.

Percentage of high priority foreign nationals removed from Canada compared to the high priority population in the removals inventory (Based on annual average)

100.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Develop and implement robust immigration enforcement policies

The CBSA is responsible for investigating, detaining, and removing foreign nationals and permanent residents found to pose a threat or be inadmissible to Canada, including persons involved in terrorism, organized crime, war crimes or crimes against humanity. The CBSA plays a crucial role in ensuring the admissibility of individuals seeking entry into Canada and to protect the safety of Canadians.

Key Commitment: Ensure the integrity of the immigration enforcement policy framework

The CBSA is committed to ensuring the ongoing integrity of the immigration enforcement policy framework. To support this commitment in 2016-2017, the Agency will develop and implement miscellaneous regulations to address identified gaps in the regulations and also to address comments raised by the Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations.

Sub-Program 1.5.1: Immigration Investigation

Description

The Immigration Investigations Program investigates reports and arrests foreign nationals and permanent residents already in Canada who are or may be inadmissible to Canada as defined by the IRPA.

Investigation techniques can include data analysis of information collected regarding an individual's immigration application, physical surveillance to locate fugitive inadmissible persons, and field searches of residences and belongings for evidence. Depending on the type of inadmissibility and the status of the person in question, inadmissibility reports are reviewed by either a Minister's Delegate or the IRB. When a person fails to appear for an immigration proceeding such as an examination, admissibility hearing or removal interview, a warrant for their arrest may be issued. Warrants may also be issued against a foreign national or permanent resident where a CBSA inland enforcement officer has reasonable grounds to believe that they are inadmissible to Canada.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Immigration investigations are conducted against foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada.

Percentage of immigration investigations initiated that result in a person being identified as inadmissible to Canada 

55.00%

March 2017

Percentage of immigration warrants executed/cancelled as a result of active investigation activities conducted by the CBSA

90.00%

March 2017

Timely investigation of foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada.

Percentage of immigration investigations finalized within one year of being initiated

95.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance the Agency’s capacity to investigate and locate foreign nationals and permanent residents in contravention of the IRPA

By strengthening immigration investigations, the capacity and ability of the CBSA to investigate and locate inadmissible foreign nationals for enforcement proceedings will be enhanced. In 2016−17, the Investigations Program will support removal efforts of inadmissible persons by continuing to investigate and locate foreign nationals and permanent residents in contravention of the IRPA. This will be achieved through the implementation of regional models to deliver a nationally consistent triage function to prioritize investigation cases. In addition, the CBSA will continue efforts to reduce the warrant inventory by way of regular review of older warrants and the negotiation of information sharing agreements aimed at improving investigation results. Lastly, the Agency will strive to enhance decision making by assessing system reporting limitations related to investigation performance data and developing an action plan to address system change requirements, where feasible.

Sub-Program 1.5.2: Detentions

Description

The Detentions Program detains and/or monitors the conditions of release of foreign nationals or permanent residents where there are reasonable grounds to believe the individual is inadmissible to Canada and where the individual is a danger to the public, poses a flight risk or where their identity is not established. Foreign nationals and permanent residents may also be detained upon entry into Canada for an examination or where the individual is suspected of being inadmissible for security reasons. They are entitled to an IRB hearing after being detained for 48 hours, 7 days and 30 days. The CBSA has three immigration holding centres in Canada located at Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Foreign nationals and permanent residents that may pose a risk to the safety and security of Canada are detained.

Percentage of foreign nationals and permanent residents who may be inadmissible to Canada or who may be ready for removal who are detained according to their assessed level of risk.

85.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Develop and implement a National Immigration Holding Centre Strategy  

Individuals who seek entry into Canada who are high-risk and are found to be inadmissible to Canada are detained in holding centres. The CBSA has standards in place to ensure that the appropriate practices are being followed and implemented. In 2016-17, the Agency will continue to advance the development and implementation of a National Immigration Holding Centre (IHC) Strategy. The IHC Strategy strives to renew inadequate or failing detention infrastructure to help achieve consistent national program standards through built for purpose facilities and services

In addition, the Agency will continue to implement the National Risk Assessment for Detentions, which establishes a standard definition of detainee risk, improves national consistency, and enhances the overall management of the detention program. The CBSA will also develop and begin to implement enhanced National Detention Standards in 2016-17. Over the course of the year, the Agency will continue to ensure that its contracts with third-parties for detention-related services enhance the effectiveness of immigration enforcement. Finally, the CBSA will continue to work on the service contract for the new IHC in the Greater Toronto Area.

Sub-Program 1.5.3: Immigration Hearings

Description

The Immigration Hearings Program ensures that the Government of Canada's interests are represented at immigration proceedings before the IRB which determines the immigration and detention status of foreign nationals and permanent residents already in Canada, in accordance with the IRPA. CBSA hearings officers are responsible for representing the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship at immigration proceedings before the IRB. This function ensures that foreign nationals and permanent residents who are inadmissible to Canada are denied status, and removal orders are issued where appropriate.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

The position of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada with respect to immigration status is represented and upheld at administrative proceedings before the IRB.

Percentage of decisions rendered by Members of the IRB and outcomes that align with the priorities of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and/or the Minister Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada

70.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Ensure the Immigration Hearings Program remains fair and transparent

The Agency’s Immigration Hearings Program contributes to Public Safety and ensures the integrity of the Immigration Program through the application of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).  In 2016-17, the CBSA will undertake a risk analysis of the Hearings Program and develop mitigation strategies to address key risks. In addition, the CBSA will assess system limitations related to the Hearings Program’s performance data and develop an action plan to address system change requirements. Additionally, in 2016-17, the Agency will review core training available to officers to ensure the necessary elements are covered, including maintaining and/or improving results in hearings before the IRB, and negotiating their inclusion in future training review plans.

Sub-Program 1.5.4: Removals

Description

The Removals Program ensures that foreign nationals and permanent residents with an enforceable removal order are removed from Canada. Once a person is removal ready, an interview is conducted to ensure that a travel document is available and that a pre removal risk assessment is offered by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Where a valid travel document is not available, CBSA inland enforcement officers liaise with foreign embassies to secure the required travel documents. The CBSA may have to make further arrangements for removal, which could include arranging for travel (e.g., purchasing an airline ticket or chartering a plane for high risk individuals in exceptional cases), providing escorts (e.g., to respond to airline and transit country requirements), and liaising with CBSA staff abroad (migration integrity officers) to ensure smooth passage from Canada to the final destination.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Timely removal of foreign nationals subject to an enforceable removal order.

Average number of days to facilitate a removal from Canada of a failed claimant who received their negative refugee determination Pre-Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act (PCISA) from Canada

* PCISA came into force December 15, 2012

650

March 2017

Average number of days to facilitate a removal from Canada of a failed claimant who received their negative refugee determination Post- PCISA from Canada

365

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Enhance the capacity and ability of the Agency to remove foreign national criminals, failed refugee claimants and other inadmissible persons from Canada in a timely and cost-effective manner

In 2016−17, the CBSA will continue to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the Removals Program by negotiating readmission arrangements with certain countries to ensure the timely issuance of travel documents, and to clearly outline protocols and procedures, in order to increase the Agency’s ability to enforce removals. The Agency will also implement a national Quality Assurance program to positively enforce data integrity and file management best practices. Finally, over the course of the year, the CBSA will update current content on the CBSA Border Information Services site to ensure that the general public is provided clearand relevant information on immigration processing.

Program 1.6: Recourse

Description

The Recourse Program provides the business community and individuals with an accessible mechanism to seek an impartial review of service-related complaints, program decisions and enforcement actions taken by the CBSA. This program ensures that their decisions are fair, transparent and accurately reflect the Agency's policies and the Acts administered by the CBSA.

Individuals can complete a written submission if they disagree with an enforcement action or a program decision made by the CBSA or wish to submit a complaint or compliment about services. Clients are provided with a timely acknowledgement of their correspondence, before CBSA officials conduct a thorough review, taking into consideration the legislation administered by the Agency, CBSA policies, the client's point of view and, where necessary, technical opinions from CBSA experts or legal advice from the Department of Justice. Individuals who are not satisfied with the CBSA's review can appeal to the appropriate court, tribunal or external review body.

The Recourse Program also facilitates the review of external complaints of discrimination filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and assists the Department of Justice representing the Agency on appeals to the Federal Court, various tribunals and other external bodies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

11,485,183 11,485,183 11,485,877 11,485,877

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

113

113

113

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms that provide timely decisions in support of the acts and regulations administered by the CBSA.

Percentage of enforcement appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 days

90.00%

March 2017

Percentage of trade appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 days

85.00%

March 2017

Percentage of enforcement appeals received that are decided within 180 days

80.00%

March 2017

Percentage of trade appeals received that are decided within 180 days

75.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Implement the first release of the Recourse Content Management System-Enforcement (RCMS-E)

In 2016-17, as part of its modernization efforts, the CBSA will implement the first release of the RCMS-E to better manage its information holdings. Files processed through the RCMS can be accessed more efficiently and effectively while also reducing the overall paper burden of the Agency, as they are logged electronically.

Key Commitment: Integrate the Review of Trusted Traveller files

In order to continue to move towards a single-window for redress for CBSA clients, the Trusted Traveller review mechanism will be better integrated into the Agency’s overall recourse functions. This will result in a more consistent and streamlined appeal process for clients.

Program 1.7: Revenue and Trade Management

Description

The Revenue and Trade Management Program administers international and regional trade agreements and domestic legislation and regulations governing trade in commercial goods. The Program ensures that appropriate trade data is collected and that the duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are remitted in accordance with Canadian trade laws and import requirements. Commercial importers must accurately report on their goods at the time of importation, and remit the required payment, or self-correct their entries, and pay any additional amounts owing, when they have reason to believe that trade-related reporting errors have occurred.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18*
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

80,336,485

80,336,485

68,042,143

68,042,143

*The reduction of planned spending between 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 is due to the planned reduction of funding for Phase 2 of the CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management Project and the Single Window Initiative.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

835

787

787

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are collected in accordance with trade policies

Percentage of compliance* of importers with Canada's trade laws and importing requirements

* This compliance rate is determined through a random verification process. Compliance is defined as a verification that results in less than $1000 owed to the Government of Canada.

85.00%

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Support the Canadian economy by modernizing the systems and processes that facilitate the importation of goods into the country

Trade is vital for Canada’s economy as it opens markets for Canadian goods and services, growing the country’s businesses and creating jobs for Canadians. The CBSA will continue the implementation of the CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM) initiative in support of the economy. Moreover, CARM will support service delivery improvement to Canada’s import trade community by moving from transaction-based account management, to a client-centered focus. The first phase, a new Accounts Receivable Ledger system, was implemented in January 2016. This new system will be leveraged to improve efficiencies, enable e-payment options and strengthen the use of technology to more efficiently and effectively manage and report on revenues collected on behalf of the Government of Canada.  Clients will benefit from streamlined client-based accounting and enhanced financial statements, as well as increased payment flexibility.

Additionally, in 2016-17, the CBSA will continue to support the Government of Canada’s trade agenda by working with federal partners in administering Canada’s trade agreements. The Agency will look to support the Government of Canada’s efforts to work with the U.S. and Mexico to facilitate trade.

Sub-Program 1.7.1: Anti-Dumping and Countervailing

Description

The Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Program is responsible for the administration of the Special Import Measures Act (SIMA). Its role is to provide assistance to Canadian producers who face unfair foreign competition from dumped or subsidized goods in the Canadian marketplace. The SIMA provides measures of redress against such goods when they have caused injury to the Canadian industry, and is in keeping with Canada's international obligations as a signatory to the World Trade Organization (WTO). Protecting Canadian industry against the injury from dumped or subsidized imports requires a two track approach, with the CBSA responsible for determining whether imports are being dumped or subsidized, and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal making the decision of whether these imports have caused injury to Canadian production.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Canadian industry is protected from economic injury caused by the subsidizing and dumping of imported goods.

Number of Canadian jobs protected as a result of applying the SIMA

33,000

March 2017

Value of Canadian production protected as the result of applying SIMA (in $billions)

7

March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Protect the Canadian economy from injury by carrying out the Agency's responsibilities under the Special Import Measures Act

The CBSA and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal share responsibility for administering and enforcing SIMA. The combined efforts of these two entities protect tens of thousands of Canadian jobs and billions in economic activity each year. Over the course of 2016-17, the Agency will continue to perform its duties under SIMA, including conducting dumping and subsidizing investigations, re-investigations, and expiry reviews. The CBSA will continue to carry out SIMA enforcement activities to help protect Canadian industry from the injury caused by dumped or subsidized goods imported to Canada.

Sub-Program 1.7.2: Trade Policy

Description

The Trade Policy Program is responsible for interpreting the legislation and regulations that govern the tariff classification, origin and value of imported goods, and the related assessment of duties and taxes, so as to ensure that persons engaged in the importation of goods into Canada fully understand all of the trade related requirements in order to promote self-compliance. The Program also administers Canada's trade incentive initiatives (e.g., duties deferral, customs warehouses, remissions, and drawbacks) which assist Canadian businesses in remaining competitive in international markets. Further, the Program is responsible for the negotiation of the origin procedures that are included in all of Canada's free trade agreements, which serve to strengthen international trade rules and open new markets for Canadians. Finally, the Program is responsible for representing the views of Canadian businesses in international trade fora, such as the WCO and the WTO, in order to ensure a fair and accessible global trading environment.

Performance Measurement
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Importers have access to interpretations, ruling, advice and guidance on trade-related issues. Percentage of advance rulings and national customs rulings released within 120 calendar days of receipt of full information 90.00% March 2017

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Promote importer self-compliance by publishing trade-related information products

The Agency’s Trade Policy Program will continue its trade facilitation role by promoting self-compliance and providing importers with trade-related information on obligations and legislation with which they must comply. In 2016-17, the Agency will continue to ensure its trade-related policies are published and made available on the CBSA’s web site. The Program will also maintain the practice of working with importers and providing advance rulings and national customs rulings upon request, and where consent is given, publishing those rulings on the Agency’s Web site. Throughout the year, the CBSA will engage the trade community by participating in key public fora focused on trade-related issues where the Agency can disseminate information as well as respond to the community’s questions and concerns. The Agency will continue to implement the origin procedures and trade facilitation measures that are included in all of Canada’s free trade agreements.

Sub-Program 1.7.3: Trade Compliance

Description

The Trade Compliance Program works to ensure that Canadian importers accurately account for the commercial goods that they bring into Canada and pay all of the duties and taxes owing. Compliance activities include random verifications, selected using a statistical model, that are used to measure the rate of compliance by product type and/or industry. The results also provide valuable information that often lead to more focused, risk based verifications in instances where non-compliance is suspected. These trade compliance activities are supported by robust monitoring and administrative penalty programs that are aimed at maintaining a level playing field for all Canadian importers by making certain that the rules apply equally to everyone and that the appropriate duties and taxes are paid in full.

Performance Measurement*
Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets

Date to Be Achieved

Importers are in compliance with Canadian trade laws Percentage of revenue-based, targeted compliance verifications that yield a positive result for the CBSA (i.e., $1000 or more owing to the Government of Canada) 65.00% March 2017

* The CBSA is transitioning to a multi-year cycle for random verifications and will report on the random compliance rate at the end of each cycle rather than yearly.

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Ensure that duties and taxes owing on imported goods are accurately assessed

By ensuring all taxes and duties on imports owed to the Government of Canada are paid, the Agency will continue to protect Canadian businesses from unfair competition. In 2016-17, the CBSA will conduct trade compliance verifications related to tariff classification, origin, valuation, and trade incentives. The Agency will also maintain the expansion of the Quality Assurance program in 2016-17 to include verifications of trade incentives.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates

2016-17
Planned Spending

2017-18
Planned Spending

2018-19
Planned Spending

320,402,518

320,402,518

319,069,769

318,659,677

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2,053

2,048

2,044

Planning Highlights

Key Commitment: Continue implementing a robust financial management regime

In order to make good financial decisions based on accurate data, to stop funding initiatives that are no longer effective and invest program dollars in those areas that are of good value to Canadians, a robust financial management regime is under development to enable the Agency to achieve its business objectives. In 2016-17, the CBSA will continue to enhance its financial management by further integrating technology, automating systems and streamlining processes. Efforts will continue on the renewal of existing financial policies to ensure that roles and responsibilities are well defined and that the consolidated policy structure is seamlessly integrated into related CBSA business processes. The CBSA will further strengthen its financial management regime by implementing an improved Revenue Management Framework and improving tools and processes that support effective planning, budgeting, forecasting and project expenditure management.

Key Commitment: Modernize Agency Border Infrastructure

The Government of Canada is committed to making greater investments in Canadian infrastructure, including Canada’s roads, bridges and border gateways. As part of this commitment, the Government and the CBSA are supporting efforts to renew the Agency’s Border Infrastructure and Custodial POE. In 2016-17, the CBSA will continue to modernize the Agency's Custodial POE by initiating work to determine the best approach to modernize small and remote POE, delivering key infrastructure projects underway, including in Lacolle, Quebec and Stewart and Fraser, British Columbia, and finalizing preparatory work for construction at the North Portal, Saskatchewan and Emerson, Manitoba border crossings. The Agency continues to play a key role with Transport Canada and the Windsor Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA) in the delivery of the Gordie Howe International Bridge. These efforts include participation in the delivery of the Agency’s requirements for the Gordie Howe International Bridge POE, leveraging efficiencies with the United States Customs and Border Patrol and support to the WDBA throughout the procurement process.

Key Commitment: Modernize information technology systems to make them more responsive to the Agency’s needs

Front line officers need modern IT tools to support the Agency's day-to-day operations. Updating the IT infrastructure will increase productivity and improve decision-making capabilities throughout the Agency. In 2016-17, the CBSA will continue to work with Shared Services Canada to transform enabling IT infrastructure to more modern Government of Canada solutions. The Agency’s modernization efforts will also include upgrading the CBSA’s risk assessment tools to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of intelligence, risk assessment and security screening activities.

Key Commitment: Support a high-performing and innovative workforce that operates in a fair and healthy working environment.

As the CBSA actively implements Border Modernization to respond to the changing global landscape and changes in border management, it is crucial that its workforce adapt to this evolving context. To support its workforce, the Agency has developed a strategic framework to share its vision and expectations for people management excellence known as the People Strategy. The Strategy reflects the commitment to ensure CBSA employees have the proper training, tools and working environment to strive for and achieve excellence. Implementation of the Strategy will be measured against three priorities: workforce development, leadership support and the creation of an enabling environment. In 2016-17, the CBSA will develop workforce strategies, including a mental health strategy, and support employee development and leadership capacity while maintaining a respectful work environment.

Key Commitment: Ensure services offered to Canadians and people entering Canada are in compliance with the Official Languages Act.

In 2016-17, the Agency will continue to ensure Canadians and people entering Canada are welcomed either in English or French. Over the course of the year, the CBSA Official Language School will continue to work with the regions to establish available and accessible in-class and online training. Furthermore, the Agency will place special focus on ensuring its current and future managers get the training they require while continuing to engage all staff as they put forward new and innovative approaches to develop and maintain bilingual capacity and create an environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the CBSA’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the CBSA’s website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016
(dollars)
Financial Information

2015-16
Forecast Results

2016-17
Planned Results

Difference
(2016-17 Planned Results minus 2015-16 Forecast  Results)

Total expenses

1,881,251,000

1,784,766,000

(96,485,000)

Total revenues

18,430,000

18,430,000

nil

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

1,862,821,000

1,766,336,000

(96,485,000)

As the aforementioned future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amount is prepared using the cash-basis of accounting, amounts will differ.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities are available on the CBSA’s website.

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication Footnoteiv. The tax measures presented in that publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For more information on the CBSA and its activities, please visit the CBSA's website.

Contact Information for General Inquiries

By Telephone:

Within Canada: 1-800-461-9999

Outside Canada (long distance charges apply): 1-204-983-3500 or 1-506-636-5064

TTY within Canada (For those with hearing or speech impairments): 1-866-335-3237

By Email:

contact@cbsa.gc.ca

By Mail:

Canada Border Services Agency
Ottawa, ON
Canada
K1A 0L8

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high‑level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
whole-of-government framework
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Footnote

Footnote 1

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

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