PART III - Departmental Expenditure Plans: Departmental Plan

Table of Contents

Catalogue No. PS35-6E-PDF
ISSN 2371-7505

This document is also available in PDF (1.5 MB) [help with PDF files]

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P., Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Minister's Message

Our 2017–18 Departmental Plan provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on what we do and the results we are trying to achieve during the upcoming year. To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report to replace the Report on Plans and Priorities.

The title of the report has been changed to reflect its purpose: to communicate our annual performance goals and the financial and human resources forecast to deliver those results. The report has also been restructured to tell a clearer, more straightforward and balanced story of the actual results we are trying to achieve, while continuing to provide transparency on how tax payers' dollars will be spent. We describe our programs and services for Canadians, our priorities for 2017–18, and how our work will fulfill our departmental mandate commitments and the government's priorities.

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) provides integrated border services that support national security and public safety priorities and facilitate the free flow of legitimate trade and travel. This mandate has direct consequences for the well-being of our country. In 2017–18, the CBSA will continue to meet an array of operational and policy challenges, all of which will require fully supported human resources, program development and technological innovation. Additionally, substantial changes in geopolitical relationships, criminal activity and immigration trends will require a CBSA that is more responsive and flexible than in the past.

Specifically, the CBSA will need to continue supporting the government's broad efforts to improve and maintain strong relations with the United States (U.S.) trade and border policies. In an important effort to facilitate increased Canada-U.S. trade, the Agency will take further steps to support the Gordie Howe International Bridge project in the coming year. 

The CBSA also has a range of operational challenges to manage. Organized crime is becoming increasingly sophisticated, which poses new challenges for intelligence and interdiction. The arrival of highly potent opioids, like fentanyl and carfentanil is posing increased challenges for the Agency at Canada's borders. The CBSA also continues to play an integral part in welcoming and re-settling an unprecedented number of refugees from conflict areas around the world, including Syria and Iraq.

The CBSA is taking a number of steps to effectively address this new environment. Using emerging technologies and strengthened partnerships, it will give its officers the necessary tools and resources to improve security and service at the border. In co-operation with the U.S., the CBSA will continue to pursue full implementation of Entry/Exit and Preclearance systems to keep Canada safe and open for business. Similarly, the Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) initiative will allow for the collection of passenger information to identify high-risk travellers before they arrive in Canada. In terms of infrastructure, the Agency is in the process of transforming its detentions program and facilities in order to provide alternatives to detention, better conditions and improved security for those in its care.

Finally, in 2017–18, the CBSA will evaluate its strategic direction to meet the demands of a rapidly changing border environment. Even with its busy day-to-day mandate, the Agency is looking years down the road to ensure it evolves to meet the needs of those travelling to and importing into Canada.

I am very proud to serve as Minister responsible for the CBSA. I am confident the organization will continue to deliver on the priorities expressed in the Prime Minister's mandate letterFootnote i to me.

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Plans at a glance

Focusing the Canada Border Services Agency's (CBSA) efforts and resources on travellers and goods that are of the highest risk, while facilitating the legitimate flow of goods and people into Canada, is at the heart of what the CBSA does. In 2017–18, the Agency will deliver on this mandate by enhancing its infrastructure and improving the services it provides to facilitate the flow of travellers and conveyances, while advancing its risk assessment and screening procedures to focus on intercepting high-risk goods and people bound for Canada. The plans below provide a snapshot of the types of investments the Agency is undertaking to support the free flow of goods and people and to improve the security of Canadians.

For more information on the CBSA's plans, priorities and planned results, see the "Planned results" section of this report.

Modernize security screening procedures

Over the course of the year, the Agency will continue to support the Government of Canada's "Security and Opportunity" priority by building on the significant work of resettling Syrian refugees that it completed last year together with its partners in Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS). The CBSA will also advance key security screening initiatives such as the IAPI initiative, which works to help prevent improperly documented travellers or prescribed persons from travelling to Canada. The IAPI initiative strengthened the existing Advance Passenger Information / Passenger Name Record (API/PNR) program and pushed Canada's borders out pursuant to the Beyond the Border commitment. Pending the ratification of the Passenger Name Record (PNR) agreement between the European Union (EU) and Canada, the CBSA will continue to collect PNR data per current practices.

Enhance Trusted Traveller programs

The Agency will continue to promote its Trusted Traveller Programs to facilitate the legitimate flow of people across the border, allowing the Agency to focus its resources on higher-risk travellers and will enhance the traveller experience through automating the declaration process in the air mode. The CBSA continually seeks to strengthen program integrity and modernize its trusted traveller programs through, for example, the international expansion of the NEXUS program.

Throughout 2017–18, the CBSA will work with the United States (U.S.) Customs and Border Protection to expand NEXUS eligibility to third countries, namely Mexico and the United Kingdom, to increase international benefits.  

Modernize and secure the border

The CBSA will continue to support efforts to strengthen Canada's relationship with the U.S., and further advance the Government of Canada's "Security and Opportunity" priority as well as the Minister's mandate letter commitment to keep Canadians safe. This commitment will be met through the Agency's contribution to the new Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy, and the Entry/Exit initiative. Entry/Exit collects entry information on all travellers entering Canada, and shares this information with the U.S. Similarly, the Agency will work with colleagues in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to collect and share information between the CBSA and the National Sex Offender Registry administered by the RCMP.

Ongoing development of the next generation of Primary Inspection Kiosks and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology will further minimize delays and facilitate traveller processing for air and highway travellers, respectively. The Agency's plans to deploy wireless handheld devices to small and remote ports of entry without traditional infrastructure will also assist in processing travellers, and allow the CBSA to focus resources on identifying and interdicting higher-risk people and goods.

Implement the National Immigration Detention Framework

The Agency continues to support the Minister's priority to transform immigration detention with a view to creating a better, fairer system that minimizes the use of criminal correctional facilities. Over the year, the Agency will work to ensure that viable alternatives to detention are available across the country.  In doing so, the CBSA expects to reduce the number of minors and long-term detainees held in immigration detention. Furthermore, in implementing the National Immigration Detention Framework, the Agency will begin addressing concerns of the United Nations Commission for Refugees and the Canadian Red Cross Society, among other stakeholder organizations, regarding immigration detention practices and facilities in Canada.

Modernize border infrastructure

As part of the Government of Canada's commitment to making greater investments in Canadian infrastructure, the CBSA is supporting efforts to renew the Agency's border and IT Infrastructure. Modernizing our physical and technological infrastructure will get goods processed at the border faster and into Canadian markets sooner. It will also provide border service officers with enhanced tools to increase productivity and improve decision-making, allowing people to quickly move on to their final destinations.

Throughout the year, the Agency will work with Shared Services Canada to upgrade computing and communications infrastructure at various ports of entry (POE). The CBSA will also enter into the procurement phase of physical infrastructure projects, including work to renew small land POE.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border.

Mandate and role

The CBSA, established by the Canada Border Services Act, is an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which is responsible for integrated national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border management operations. Specific responsibilities of the CBSA include the following:

Examples of Acts Administered by the CBSA

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Customs Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Food and Drug Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Special Import Measures Act

CBSA Service Points

The CBSA provides services at multiple points across Canada and abroad, including the following:

  • 117 land border crossings
  • 71 sufferance warehouses
  • 27 rail offices
  • 224 airports
  • 437 marine reporting sites
  • 12 ferry terminals
  • 10 cruise ship operations
  • 216 commercial vessel clearance facilities
  • 3 international mail processing centres
  • 36 international offices
  • 54 inland offices

Regional Distribution of CBSA Offices

Regional Distribution of CBSA Offices

CBSA around the World

CBSA around the World

For more general information about the department, see the "Supplementary information" section of this report. For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister's mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.Footnote ii

Operating context: conditions affecting our work

The CBSA operates in a complex and dynamic global environment where it must be responsive to government priorities and major events related to global security and trade, such as last year's priority of resettling over 25,000 Syrian refugees or the lifting of the visa requirement for Mexican nationals entering Canada. The Agency is undergoing a transformation in the way it does its business, focusing on better use of intelligence and analytics, a more strategic planning culture that focusses on delivering results for Canadians and using IT to find innovative solutions to some of its most pressing issues and risks. The Agency is also expecting an increase in immigration numbers to have an impact on the CBSA's operations in 2017–18.

The conflict in Syria and Iraq continues to have a significant impact on the safety and security of Canadians, the country's institutions and its interests abroad. The evolving threats of "homegrown" terrorism and terror activities influenced by Daesh, Al-Qaeda, etc., are a key public safety challenge that the Agency continues to monitor closely. Therefore, collaboration among Public Safety Portfolio departments as well as the international community to interdict threats abroad is a key priority for the CBSA and its partners.

With the inauguration of a new U.S. administration, Canada will continue to work closely on a number of border-related issues with our largest and most important political and economic ally, such as cross-border deaths involving the prescription drug fentanyl. The Government of Canada is updating its drug strategy to provide a comprehensive approach that will reduce the harms currently experienced by individuals and communities. Over the year, the Government of Canada is expected to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Customs Act, and the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act to better equip health and law enforcement officials to counter the harms associated with drug and substance abuse in Canada.

Cross-border movement of goods by organized crime is becoming increasingly sophisticated and is likely to remain a serious concern, posing significant intelligence and interdiction challenges for the CBSA. The Agency will continue to work closely with international law enforcement to identify gaps and risk assess threats to the global trade and transportation networks exploited by organized crime for illegal trafficking of contraband, prohibited weapons and suspected proceeds of crime.

To address these changes, advances in technology are revolutionizing the way the Agency designs, builds and delivers its programs and services. The Agency is expected to leverage the latest technologies, including making greater use of big data analyses, to conduct risk assessments as well as provide enhanced services at the border. At the same time, the Agency is undergoing internal changes to ensure that its workforce is able to meet the challenges of tomorrow. Keeping pace with technological advances, working closely with our partners and engaging our employees will continue to be enduring priorities for the Agency to ensure greater collective safety and security of the international travel continuum and the global supply chain.

Key risks: things that could affect our ability to achieve our plans and results

Security

The risk of not keeping pace with cross-border criminal activity, national security threats, migration flows and public safety priorities.

The CBSA plays an important role in ensuring the safety and security of Canadians and protecting public health and the country's economic prosperity. Keeping pace with cross-border criminal activity, national security threats, migration flows and public safety priorities is an ongoing challenge. Technological advances present both threats and opportunities in border management. While these advances may increase the Agency's capabilities, they may also benefit transnational organized crime groups in identifying and exploiting border vulnerabilities. Ongoing work towards full implementation of the Entry/Exit Initiative, modernization of the Postal Program, as well as the Agency's core targeting, examination, detection, and enforcement activities serve to help mitigate this risk.

Intelligence and Analysis

The risk of not adequately analyzing global information, trends and challenges related to security and supply.

The Agency's ability to address border threats is related to the degree to which it can analyze global information, trends and challenges related to security and supply. As such, the availability of actionable intelligence is of great importance; however, current jurisdictional agreements and legislation impact intelligence flows between the Agency and its partners. A lack of international information-sharing agreements on a broader scope of topics also creates difficulties in addressing threats. Ongoing consultation with security screening partners, the implementation of IAPI, Advance Passenger Information (API)/Passenger Name Record, and eManifest will contribute to managing this risk.

Facilitation

The risk of not enhancing business models to increasingly facilitate the border movement of low-risk travellers and goods.

Businesses, as well as travellers, expect a quick and efficient border crossing experience. Greater use of automation offers more simplicity, transparency and speed in service delivery. Trusted programs, which enhance trade chain and traveller security while providing pre-approved, low-risk travellers and traders with streamlined and efficient border processes, continue to see strong growth. However, pressures related to program maintenance and compliance monitoring are being experienced, increasing the risk that program benefits may not be fully realized. Continued expansion of the Preclearance program and ongoing implementation of the next generation of Primary Inspection Kiosks (PIK) are helping to ensure this risk is managed.

Trade Compliance

The risk of not enforcing trade compliance and collecting appropriate revenue.

The Agency influences the Canadian marketplace by enforcing trade compliance and collecting revenue fairly, thereby ensuring a level playing field. The Agency has limited available capacity to target imports for trade compliance verification, which increases the likelihood of inaccurately assessed goods entering the country undetected. Existing trade compliance risking and verification activities and the implementation of the CBSA Assessment Revenue Management initiative (CARM) are some of the controls for addressing this risk.

Key risks
Risks Risk response strategy Link to the department's Programs Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities
Security
  • Work jointly with the U.S. on the Entry/Exit Initiative
  • Implement Remote Traveller Processing (RTP)
  • Modernize the Postal Program and implement processes and systems to meet international standards in the Courier/Low Value Shipment streams
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination
Government of Canada Priority:
  • Security and Opportunity
Intelligence and Analysis
  • Work towards the ratification of the PNR Treaty with the EU
  • Introduce a new targeting tool in eManifest for commercial shipments, conveyances and equipment
  • Advance technologies and processes that will further IAPI program
  • Risk Assessment
  • Admissibility Determination
Government of Canada Priority:
  • Security and Opportunity
Facilitation
  • Advance the development of the Preclearance program
  • Pursue Mutual Recognition Agreements that build on the benefits offered to Trusted Program participants
  • Secure and Trusted Partnerships
  • Admissibility Determination
Government of Canada Priority:
  • A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy
Trade Compliance
  • Implementation of the CARM initiative
  • Secure and Trusted Partnerships
  • Revenue and Trade Management
Government of Canada Priority:
  • A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Programs

Program 1.1: Risk Assessment

Description

The Risk Assessment program "pushes the border out" by seeking to identify high-risk people, goods and conveyances as early as possible in the travel and trade continuum to prevent inadmissible people and goods from entering Canada. This benefits the travelling public and the trade community by enabling the Agency to focus its examination and interdiction activities on high-risk people and goods, thereby facilitating the entry of low-risk travellers and goods. The Agency uses a variety of threat and risk assessment methodologies, intelligence and supporting technologies to identify potential risks to the security and safety of people and goods.

Planning highlights
Modernize security screening procedures

Over the past year, the CBSA performed security screening activities as part of the government-wide effort to resettle Syrian refugees in Canada. The CBSA, IRCC and CSIS are currently exploring opportunities to make the program more efficient by identifying and eliminating gaps and duplication and exploring possibilities to further modernize the process in the future.

In 2017–18, the CBSA will continue to advance technologies and processes that will further traveller-related program initiatives, such as the IAPI initiative. The Agency will continue to work towards the ratification of the PNR Treaty with the EU. The Treaty ensures that air carriers based in the EU provide PNR data to the CBSA for risk assessment purposes, which the CBSA uses to issue board/no-board messages to commercial air carriers. In addition, IAPI will enhance traveller screening prior to departure for Canada. Expanding the collection of API to non-commercial air carriers will address the gaps identified by the Beyond the Border Action Plan audit reportFootnote iii on the risks of not knowing in advance who is entering the country.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results* 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

* Even though the 18% target has not been met, results are within the acceptable threshold range because it represents aggregate data that is combined from several measurements.

** 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report

Potential threats to the safety and security of Canada, such as inadmissible goods and people, are identified, assessed and intercepted prior to arrival Percentage of threats that led to an enforcement action or inadmissibility recommendation 18% March 2018 18.00% 19.00% 10.40%**
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
173,555,664 173,555,664 170,297,370 170,235,705
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
1,198 1,167 1,167

Program 1.2: Secure and Trusted Partnerships

Description

Through the Secure and Trusted Partnerships Program, the CBSA works closely with clients, other government departments and international border management partners to enhance trade chain and traveller security while providing pre-approved, low-risk travellers and traders with streamlined and efficient border processes. The CBSA develops and administers programs and cooperative agreements with its partners to ensure alignment with international standards (e.g., the World Customs Organization (WCO) SAFE Framework of Standards) and promote best practices in global border management. By increasing membership in trusted traveller and trader programs, the CBSA is able to improve its capacity to mitigate risk in advance and focus examination efforts on identifying travellers and traders of unknown or higher risk.

Planning highlights
Continue to enhance trusted traveller programs

In 2017–18, the NEXUS program will be further enhanced by launching international arrangements with Mexico and the U.K. that will enable Mexican and British members of their respective domestic trusted traveller program to apply to NEXUS.

Strengthen strategic and operational cooperation

In 2017–18, the CBSA and its partners plan to expand the existing pre-clearance program from eight to ten airports in Canada, adding Toronto (Billy Bishop) and Quebec City airports, as well as the Montréal train station and the Rocky Mountaineer train in British Columbia. For those pre-inspection sites that choose to convert existing operations to full preclearance, the CBSA and its partners will support this transition. The Agency will also advance the program's development to support future pre-clearance operations in the U.S.

Continue to enhance trusted traveller programs

In 2017–18, the Agency will continue to harmonize the Partners in Protection (PIP) program with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) program in the areas of policy, procedures, and processing practices. The CBSA and U.S. CBP will continue to focus on joint implementation and subsequent assessment of PIP/C-TPAT Harmonization for highway carriers. The Agency will also continue ongoing Mutual Recognition Arrangement negotiations and initiate new ones to strengthen international programs and build on the benefits offered to participants of Trusted Trader Programs.

The CBSA will continue to develop the Trusted Trader Portal initiating efforts on the Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) and Automated Risking components of the project. In addition, the Agency will complete its review and development of performance indicators to more accurately measure the impact and outcomes of its Trusted Trader Programs, in order to provide Canadians with a more complete picture of the associated benefits.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

The drop in the most recent fiscal year reflects the dramatically large increases in the two previous years. While 2015-16 saw a smaller increase in active members (159,972) than 2014-15 (202,955), it should be noted that 2014-15 experienced the highest annual increase in active trusted traveller program members ever recorded, fueled primarily by the NEXUS program. The combined volume increase of active members in 2015-16 was only slightly less than the volume increase for 2013-14 (161,074); a difference of only 1,102 members. Volumes recorded for the first three quarters of 2016-17, as of December 31, 2016, have surpassed the volumes recorded for the first three quarters of 2015-16, as of December 31, 2015.

* N/A signifies that the performance indicator was not in use that year

** The 2015–16 results for Trusted Trader Program (TTP) memberships was updated to align to the total TTP membership reporting methodologies developed at part of recent Audit General of Canada's recommendations. The updated results are 163.

Capacity to focus on high-risk people and goods at ports of entry is increased.

Percentage increase in trusted traveller programs membership from previous fiscal year

*An increase in trusted travellers will result in a decrease of unknown or high risk travellers, thereby allowing BSOs to focus more on the latter group of travellers
12.00% March 2018 17.20% 18.90% 12.50%

Number of approved memberships from total applications to Trusted Trader Program.

80.00 March 2018 N/A* N/A* 133**

Average time savings for NEXUS members at land Port of Entry (POE) (average processing time in NEXUS lanes versus conventional lanes) in seconds

*Processing time is the time elapsed from the initiation of the licence plate reader until the release/referral decision is entered into the system
5 seconds March 2018 31 seconds N/A* 34 seconds**
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
37,910,170 37,910,170 34,896,687 34,896,737
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
397 397 397

Program 1.3: Admissibility Determination

Description

Through the Admissibility Determination program, the CBSA develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships that enable BSOs to intercept people and goods that are inadmissible to Canada and to process legitimate people and goods seeking entry into Canada within established service standards. In addition, the Agency develops, maintains and administers the policies, regulations, procedures and partnerships to control the export of goods from Canada.

In the traveller stream, BSOs question people upon arrival to determine if they and their personal goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Border services officers will then make a decision to grant entry or refer a person for further processing (e.g., payment of duties and taxes, issuance of a document), and/or for a physical examination.

In the commercial stream, carriers and importers are required to provide information to the CBSA at or prior to arrival in Canada. Border services officers review the status of pre arrival decisions and/or the provided accompanying documentation to determine whether the goods meet the requirements of applicable legislation and regulations to enter Canada. Based on this determination, a border services officer may refer the goods for further processing, examination and/or scientific/engineering analysis. Upon further examination goods may be seized, released or penalties imposed.

With some exceptions, all goods being exported from Canada must be reported "in writing" to the CBSA.

Planning highlights
Modernize and secure the border

In 2017–18, Canada and the U.S. will continue to work jointly on the Entry/Exit initiative, a Minister's mandate letter commitment through which entry into one country confirms departure from the other. Throughout the year, the Agency will further its work on the current information exchange with the U.S. at the land border to include all travellers and use the additional exit records to close immigration warrants and reprioritize removal orders. The Agency will also deploy wireless handheld technology to support primary processing at POE that do not have traditional infrastructure, complete the current deployment of RFID technology and continue the implementation of the next generation of PIK to improve the Agency's ability to manage its traveller airport of entry operations.

In addition, the Agency's support for the new Canadian Drugs and Substances Strategy further supports the Minister's Mandate commitments. Under the new Strategy, the Agency will help protect Canadian communities from the devastating effects of prescription drug abuse by prohibiting the importation of unregistered pill presses and providing BSOs with improved authorities to interdict suspect mail.

The Agency will continue to employ new technologies to secure the border. For example, in January 2017 the CBSA completed the RTP pilot in Morses Line, Quebec, which extended the hours of service at the POE by enabling travellers arriving after staffed-hours to be processed by an off-site BSO. Over the course of 2017–18, the Agency will analyze the results of the pilot and determine the way forward for RTP.

Highlighting CBSA innovation
eDeclaration

CanBorder apps, the CBSA's series of mobile apps, is geared towards improving border security, streamlining service, reducing border wait times and alleviating congestion for travellers entering Canada. The newest app, eDeclaration, allows travellers to complete their customs declaration in advance of arriving at the primary inspection line (PIL). Using the app will save travellers roughly 40% of the projected processing time upon arrival. In addition to streamlining the border crossing experience, eDeclaration will allow the CBSA to reduce paper consumption through digital service delivery by phasing out the current Declaration Card distributed on-board aircraft.

IAPI has been implemented for the top 201 commercial air carriers. The Agency plans to continue onboarding more commercial air carriers. In addition, the Agency continues to study the most suitable way forward regarding the non-commercial industry in relation to IAPI.

The CBSA is also committed to implementing system changes to reflect amendments to Bill C-26, the Sex Offender Information Registration Act, which will permit the CBSA to collect travel information from registered sex offenders, and authorize information sharing between the National Sex Offender Registry, administered by the RCMP, and the CBSA.

Strengthen and simplify the importation process

In 2017–18, the CBSA will continue engaging and cooperating with its North American partners to advance its border management initiatives and national security interests. To this end, the CBSA will enhance the Rail Program, in part, by building on recommendations from an internal auditFootnote iv by supporting progress towards increased electronic reporting.

The Agency will also continue to work with industry partners and the Port Authority in Vancouver to advance the Marine Container Examination Facility (MCEF) Project over the course of the year.  The opening of a new MCEF will increase the Agency's examination capacity and enhance the facilitation of legitimate trade.

In 2017–18, the Commercial Passage portion of the eManifest project will be deployed to enhance commercial processing in all modes. The new functionality will enable BSOs to process commercial shipments using a modern, integrated, user-friendly screen, for more efficient primary processing. eManifest Commercial Passage will also provide BSOs with a more efficient process to capture examination results and the ability to confirm a drivers identity through the introduction of picture-in-booth technology; this will expedite processing of low risk, trusted drivers in highway mode. In addition, the eManifest project will introduce a new targeting tool for commercial shipments, conveyances and equipment that will enhance targeting capabilities in all modes of transportation and provide a more efficient approach to risk assessment.

Finally, in 2017–18, the Agency will continue to modernize the Postal Program and implement processes and systems to meet international standards in the Courier/Low Value Shipment stream. By improving operations of the Vancouver Mail Centre and beginning the modernization of both the Montreal and Toronto Mail Centres, the CBSA will be able to facilitate the processing of these shipments. Modernization of these processes will allow the Agency to meet growing e-Commerce volumes and further align with our international partners.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

* N/A signifies that the performance indicator was not in use that year.

** N/A signifies that the performance indicator was not in use that year; however, when the revised methodology is applied to the "percentage of commercial goods examined that resulted in seizure action" indicator, the 2013–14 and 2014–15 results are 0.06% and 0.08%, respectively.

People and goods who are inadmissible to Canada are intercepted at ports of entry

Percentage of people examined who are found inadmissible

3.20% March 2018 N/A* 3.83% 3.20%

Percentage of imported commercial goods examined that result in seizure action in the marine, highway, air and rail modes of importation

0.05%

March 2018 N/A** N/A** 0.08%

Legitimate people entering Canada at a land port of entry are processed within established service standards

Percentage of people reaching the primary inspection booth within the service standard (10 minutes on weekdays; 20 minutes on weekends and holidays)

95.00% March 2018 94.60% 97.10% 97.20%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19*
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending

*The reduction of planned spending between 2017–18 and 2018–19 is mainly due to the sunset of capital funding for the Accelerated Infrastructure Program to maintain and upgrade federal infrastructure assets and the decrease of operating and capital funding requirements for major initiatives included in the Beyond the Border Action Plan.

923,906,326 923,906,326 794,324,175 786,292,838
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents

*As noted above, in 2018–19, the Agency's funding for Admissibility Determination has mainly decreased  in capital and non-salary requirements which has no significant impact in the number of FTEs.

7,427 7,403 7,399

Program 1.4: Criminal Investigations

Description

Under the Criminal Investigations program, the CBSA protects the integrity of border-related legislation and contributes to public safety and Canada's economic security by investigating and pursuing the prosecution of travellers, importers, exporters and/or other persons who commit criminal offences in contravention of Canada's border-related legislation.

CBSA investigators review potential border legislation violations and gather evidence using a variety of investigative techniques, including search warrants, production orders and digital forensic analysis. These violations include criminal offences under the Customs Act, Immigration and Refugees Protection Act (IRPA), various food, plant and animal legislation, and other border-related legislation. In conjunction with the Public Prosecution Service of Canada, the CBSA pursues the prosecution of individuals or business entities who violate Canada's border-related legislation.

Planning highlights
Continue to strengthen the criminal investigations program

In 2017–18, the CBSA will continue to strengthen its capacity to investigate and prosecute individuals or business entities that violate Canada's border-related legislation. For instance, the Agency will implement its updated national training standards for investigators and work will continue to leverage the newly designed Criminal Investigator training courses to improve program guidance and provide training opportunities to staff.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

* N/A signifies that the performance indicator was not in use that year

** 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report

Crown counsel accepts referrals for prosecution prepared by CBSA

Percentage of referrals for prosecution accepted by Crown

95.00% March 2018 99.00% 98.00% 98.00%

Individuals / businesses are convicted in order to punish and deter future contraventions

Percentage of concluded prosecutions that result in a conviction

85.00% March 2018 N/A* N/A* 95.00%**
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
29,604,517 29,604,517 29,797,962 29,798,000
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
303 303 303

Program 1.5: Immigration Enforcement

Description

The Immigration Enforcement Program determines whether foreign nationals and permanent residents who are or may be inadmissible to Canada are identified and investigated, detained, monitored and/or removed from Canada. Foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada believed to be inadmissible are investigated and may have a report written against them by a CBSA inland enforcement officer. Depending on the type of inadmissibility, the merits of the report are reviewed by either a Minister's Delegate or an independent decision maker at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) where a CBSA hearings officer represents the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. Subsequent to this review, a removal order may be issued against the foreign national or permanent resident in question. Removal orders issued against refugee claimants are conditional and do not come into force until the claim against the removal order is abandoned, withdrawn or denied by the IRB.

Planning highlights
Highlighting CBSA innovation
Alternatives to Detention

Through the Community Case Management and Supervision (CCMS) program, the CBSA aims to achieve a reduction in detention of approximately 8% annually by applying elements of the Toronto Bail program and programming undertaken by Correctional Services Canada.

The current suite of tools available to officers to facilitate release from detention depends on an individual's ties to community and ability to provide a guarantor to facilitate release. As a result, many individuals are subject to costly detention where alternative community supports may be available.
In addition to the CCMS program, Electronic Monitoring aims to achieve a 1% annual reduction in detention by providing additional tools to CBSA officers to effect release of individuals deemed higher risk for non-compliance from detention, particularly in instances where removal may not be imminent and costly detention may as a result be long-term.

The Agency also plans to pilot the Telephone Voice Reporting project, which allows low-risk foreign nationals subject to immigration enforcement to self-report by placing a phone call to an automated check in system that verifies their identity through voice biometrics and captures their location at the time of the call.

Implement the National Immigration Detention Framework

In 2017–18, in support of the Minister's mandate letter commitment to create a better and fairer immigration detention system, the CBSA will advance the implementation of a multi-year plan to transform the immigration detention. The Agency will establish a community release program across all regions of the country, deploy a national compliance tool to provide an alternative to in-person reporting, enhance medical services made available in Immigration Holding Centres and engage in efforts to modernize the Laval, Quebec and Vancouver, British Columbia Immigration Holding Centres. The CBSA will also review and enhance its policy framework with a view to reducing the number of minors, vulnerable persons and long-term detainees held in detention. Cumulatively, these measures will minimize the CBSA's reliance ‎on criminal correctional facilities to house immigration detainees and provide for a more humane and affordable system that meets or exceeds international obligations with regards to immigration detention.

Improve the refugee determination system

The CBSA will work with IRCC to identify and advance policy, legislative/regulatory and operational enhancements related to the refugee determination system. Over the coming year, the CBSA will enhance its capacity and ability to remove foreign national criminals, failed refugee claimants and other inadmissible persons from Canada. In support of this commitment, the Agency will negotiate readmission arrangements with select countries and regularly update content on the CBSA Border Information Services website to ensure that the general public is provided clear and timely information on immigration processing.

Address immigration enforcement policy gaps

The Agency will advance work on amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to establish baseline conditions for monitoring and control of security inadmissibility cases as committed to in the Horizontal Evaluation of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act Division 9 / National Security Inadmissibility InitiativeFootnote v which was published on June 28, 2016. The CBSA is also committed to ensuring the ongoing integrity of the immigration enforcement policy framework. As such, the Agency will develop and implement amendments to enhance seizure authorities in response to identified gaps in the regulations as noted by the Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of RegulationsFootnote vi. Regulatory amendments to improve the CBSA's ability to enforce removal ordersFootnote vii will also be advanced. Finally, regulations to enhance the Ministerial Relief application processFootnote viii will also be developed and implemented.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

* N/A signifies that the performance indicator was not in use that year

** N/A signifies data was not collected that year.

*** 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report

Immigration enforcement actions are focused on high priority foreign nationals and permanent residents who may pose a safety and/or security risk to Canada.

Percentage of high priority foreign nationals removed from Canada compared to the high priority population in the removals inventory (Based on annual average)

95.00% March 2018 N/A* 111.00%** 83.00%***

Timely removal of failed refugee claimants who are inadmissible to Canada

Percentage of failed refugee claimants removed from Canada within 12 months of a negative decision under the new system from the Refugee Protection Division or Refugee Appeal Division)

80.00% March 2018 N/A** 51.00% 47.00%***
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending

* The Agency's planned spending will decrease between 2018–19 and 2019–20. The variance in planned spending is mainly attributed to an increase of funding under the Mexico Visa Lift Initiative offset by the decrease of capital funding requirements for the National Detention Framework due to the anticipated completion of the construction of the Surrey Immigration Holding Centre in 2018–19.

192,766,475 192,766,475 194,881,478 179,090,071
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents

In 2018–19, Immigration Enforcement full-time equivalents increases as a result of incremental funding provided, under the Mexico Visa Lift Initiative.

993 1,067 1,062

Program 1.6: Recourse

Description

The Recourse Program provides the business community and individuals with an accessible mechanism to seek an impartial review of service-related complaints, program decisions and enforcement actions taken by the CBSA. This program ensures that their decisions are fair, transparent and accurately reflect the Agency's policies and the Acts administered by the CBSA.

Individuals can complete a written submission if they disagree with an enforcement action or a program decision made by the CBSA or wish to submit a complaint or compliment about services. Clients are provided with a timely acknowledgement of their correspondence, before CBSA officials conduct a thorough review, taking into consideration the legislation administered by the Agency, CBSA policies, the client's point of view and, where necessary, technical opinions from CBSA experts or legal advice from the Department of Justice. Individuals who are not satisfied with the CBSA's review can appeal to the appropriate court, tribunal or external review body.

The Recourse Program also facilitates the review of external complaints of discrimination filed with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and assists the Department of Justice representing the Agency on appeals to the Federal Court, various tribunals and other external bodies.

Planning highlights
Modernize the recourse program

In line with Blueprint 2020, the Agency will review the feasibility of the ideas that were generated from the Recourse Innovation Working Group that occurred in October 2016, including streamlining the Access to Information and Privacy Recourse Directorate process to remove paper copies of documents in support of the Government of Canada Green Initiative. In addition, the Agency will continue to implement recommendations from the Trade Programs Functional Review conducted in 2016–17, such as improving front-end processing, the soundness of decisions and case management with the goal of streamlining Agency Trade processes and modernizing the way the Agency does business. By ensuring decisions are made in a timely manner and enhancing the quality of enforcement decisions, the Agency's Recourse Program will continue to offer a robust redress mechanism to the public through which the public can challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions. This is done in accordance with various legislative appeal provisions.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

* N/A signifies that the performance indicator was not in use that year

** 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report

*** In 2015–16, Recourse performance was reported in workable time.  That means that all periods during which a file could not be worked on were removed from the calculation. Going forward, performance on enforcement appeals will be reported exclusively in the number of calendar days it took between receipt of the appeal in CBSA and the decision date.

Travellers and the import/export community have access to recourse mechanisms to challenge certain CBSA actions and decisions in a timely manner

Percentage of enforcement appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 days

90.00% March 2018 N/A* 87% 87.00%

Percentage of trade appeals received that are acknowledged within 10 days

85.00% March 2018 N/A* 87% N/A*

Percentage of enforcement appeals received that are decided within 180 days

80.00% March 2018 N/A* 64.00%** 94.00%**

Percentage of trade appeals received that are decided within 180 days

75.00% March 2018 N/A* 78% 76.00%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
10,432,587 10,432,587 10,441,509 10,441,523
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
111 111 111

Program 1.7: Revenue and Trade Management

Description

The Revenue and Trade Management Program administers international and regional trade agreements and domestic legislation and regulations governing trade in commercial goods. The Program ensures that appropriate trade data is collected and that the duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are remitted in accordance with Canadian trade laws and import requirements. Commercial importers must accurately report on their goods at the time of importation, and remit the required payment, or self-correct their entries, and pay any additional amounts owing, when they have reason to believe that trade-related reporting errors have occurred.

Planning highlights
Modernize the trade program and relateed systems

In 2017–18, the CBSA will continue to support Canadian businesses engaged in international trade. It will seek to modernize trade-related programs and systems through continued implementation of CARM, which will proceed through the readiness phase and into the design phase. Once completed in March 2020, CARM will automate the processes required to assess, collect, manage and report on revenue. In doing so, it will help to improve compliance and mitigate risks to the Revenue and Trade Management Program priority and further enable importers to self-assess commercial importations and comply with Canada's trade requirements. This year, the CBSA will work with Public Services and Procurement Canada to complete the CARM smart procurement process to select a vendor partner to deliver the technology portion of CARM. Once a vendor partner is selected, the Agency will proceed with the design phase (beginning in 2017–18) and implementation of remaining CARM capabilities (from 2018–19 onwards).

The CBSA will also implement measures to strengthen the integrity of its trade-related programs. It will work closely with the Department of Finance to implement changes to the SIMA, which will increase transparency and participatory rights of Canadian industry in anti-dumping and countervailing processes.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14 Actual results 2014–15 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

* 2015–16 Departmental Performance Report.
** This performance indicator reports on the amount of significant non-compliance by importers (in dollar terms). The results indicate that importers were compliant in 97% of examined cases in 2016–2017, in terms of owing less than $1,000 of unpaid duties.  The overall compliance rate, when not taking into account whether duties were owing, is potentially lower.

Duties and taxes owed to the Government of Canada are collected in accordance with trade policies

Percentage of compliance* of importers with Canada's trade laws and importing requirements

* This compliance rate is determined through a random verification process. Compliance is defined as a verification that results in less than $1000 owed to the Government of Canada
85.00% March 2018 89.00% 84.00% ** 97.00%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
50,111,199 50,111,199 50,164,169 50,164,169
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
667 668 668

Information on the Canada Border Service Agency's lower-level programs is available on the CBSA's websiteFootnote ix and in the TBS InfoBase.Footnote x

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

Modernize border infrastructure

The CBSA is supporting the Government of Canada's commitment to invest in Canadian infrastructure to support economic growth, jobs for the middle class, and modern, efficient and sustainable federal facilities through key initiative such as the Gordie Howe International Bridge project, the Land Border Crossing project and the Government's Accelerated Infrastructure Program (AIP). In 2017–18, the Agency will continue to support the Gordie Howe International Bridge project, focussing on initial outreach to support recruitment as well as planning. Under the Land Border Crossing project, the Agency is working to modernize and renew small, land ports of entry that are aging and well beyond their life cycle for replacement.  In 2017–18 the Agency will complete its analysis of ports to renew and on initiate work on procurement.

Finally, the CBSA will continue to work with Shared Services Canada to implement modern computing, network and telephone infrastructure in support of border operations.

Increase financial agility

The CBSA operates in the context of a rapidly changing border environment, which is characterized by rising volumes across many lines of business and increasingly complex security and international contexts. At the same time that we have had to meet new demands, our resource base has declined, leading to program integrity pressures. To ensure that it is poised to meet integrated border management requirements into the future, the CBSA is undertaking two separate, but interconnected processes:

In addition, during 2017–18, the CBSA will continue to focus on resolving financial management challenges by addressing financial pressures, ensuring priorities are fully funded and optimizing revenue generation. Efforts will continue on implementing a robust financial management regime, including improving tools and processes that support effective financial planning, budgeting and forecasting. Planning efforts will be supported by strategic procurement plans for commodity-specific investment strategies to enhance the CBSA's asset life-cycle management capacity. Finally, in 2017–18, the Agency will develop a revenue generation strategy that includes a plan to increase the up-take of electronic payments.

Support a high-performing and innovative workforce

The CBSA will continue rolling out its three-year Strategy to Support Mental Health and its efforts to support a healthy, respectful and engaged CBSA workforce. The Strategy, aligned with overall Government of Canada efforts, will increase awareness about mental health, encourage open dialogue to reduce stigma, and integrate a mental health lens into CBSA programs and policies to improve employee and organizational health. It will also work to strengthen front line officer resilience and continue delivering training on how to respond appropriately when clients exhibit mental health issues. The CBSA's mental health activities will promote the health and safety of employees, clients, and people in the Agency's care.

In 2017–18, the Agency will continue to ensure Canadians and people entering Canada are welcomed either in English or French. Furthermore, the Agency will place special focus on ensuring its current and future managers get the training they require while continuing to engage all staff as they put forward new and innovative approaches to develop and maintain bilingual capacity and create an environment conducive to the use of both official languages.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
343,409,298 343,409,298 342,519,010 341,904,316
Human resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
2,543 2,534 2,533

Spending and human resources

Figure 1: CBSA Spending Trend for Program Expenditures ($ thousands)

Planned spending

In 2017–18, the majority of the sunset funding is attributed to the Accelerated Infrastructure Program to maintain and upgrade federal infrastructure assets.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15
Expenditures
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Forecast spending
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
Risk Assessment 181,814,888 196,232,431  199,728,622 173,555,664 173,555,664 170,297,370 170,235,705
Secure and Trusted Partnership 42,228,468 32,177,618  34,270,664 37,910,170 37,910,170 34,896,687 34,896,737
Admissibility Determination 982,394,090 899,788,811  938,613,222 923,906,326 923,906,326 794,324,175 786,292,838
Criminal Investigations 37,290,323 31,193,842  32,844,339 29,604,517 29,604,517 29,797,962 29,798,000
Immigration Enforcement 186,711,928 161,969,717  170,114,521 192,766,475 192,766,475 194,881,478 179,090,071
Recourse 13,359,832 11,322,864  11,794,571 10,432,587 10,432,587 10,441,509 10,441,523
Revenue and Trade Management 88,403,795 84,407,179  87,178,900 50,111,199 50,111,199 50,164,169 50,165,672
Subtotal 1,532,203,324 1,417,092,462 1,474,544,839 1,418,286,938 1,418,286,938 1,284,803,350 1,260,920,546
Internal Services 468,941,046 379,200,769  395,630,340 343,409,298 343,409,298 342,519,010 341,904,316
Total 2,001,144,370 1,796,293,231 1,870,175,179 1,761,696,236 1,761,696,236 1,627,322,360 1,602,824,862

In 2014–15, the Agency's Actual Spending was higher than 2015–16 mainly due to the one-time severance payouts for border services officers (FB) and one-time transitional payments totalling $194.8 million.

The forecasted spending for 2016–17 is higher than the actual spending in 2015–16 as the Agency continues to address increasing volumes while maintaining current service standards. In addition the CBSA is making targeted investments in its ports of entry and immigration holding centers. These investments will continue to drive expenditures in 2017–18.

Between 2017–18 and 2018–19, the reduction of planned spending is attributed to the sunset of funding for the Accelerated Infrastructure Program to maintain and upgrade federal infrastructure assets and the decrease of funding requirements due to the completion of major initiatives included in the Beyond the Border Action Plan. 

Beginning in 2018–19, the planned spending is expected to decrease and stabilize due to the completion of several major project milestones.

Planned human resources

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15
Full-time equivalents
2015–16
Full-time equivalents
2016–17
Forecast
full-time equivalents
2017–18
Planned
full-time equivalents
2018–19 Planned
full-time equivalents
2019–20 Planned
full-time equivalents
Risk Assessment 1,149 1,183 1,241 1,198 1,167 1,167
Secure and Trusted Partnership 397 411 368 397 397 397
Admissibility Determination 7,297 7,449 7,565 7,427 7,403 7,399
Criminal Investigations 283 259 295 303 303 303
Immigration Enforcement 981 1,088 966 993 1,067 1,062
Recourse 108 110 105 111 111 111
Revenue and Trade Management 715 766 721 667 668 668
Subtotal 10,930 11,266 11,261 11,096 11,116 11,107
Internal Services 2,838 2,508 2,396 2,543 2,534 2,533
Total 13,768 13,774 13,657 13,639 13,650 13,640

In 2014–15 and 2015–16, the Agency's full-time equivalents totalled 13,768 and 13,774 respectively. Although the Agency is in the process of completing existing temporary initiatives, it received funding during 2016–17 to undertake new investments. As a result, the Agency's FTE base will remain stable over the planning horizon.

Estimates by vote

For information on the Canada Border Service Agency's organizational appropriations, consult the 2017–18 Main Estimates.Footnote xi

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the CBSA's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the CBSA's websiteFootnote ix.

Future Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2016–17
Forecast results
2017–18
Planned results
Difference
(2017–18 Planned results minus 2016–17 Forecast results)
Total expenses 2,017,651,000 2,004,819,000 (12,832,000)
Total revenues 18,430,000 18,430,000 nil
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,999,221,000 1,986,389,000 (12,832,000)

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: John Ossowski

Ministerial Portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling Instruments: Canada Border Services Agency ActFootnote xii; Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness ActFootnote xiii

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 2003

Reporting framework

The CSBA's Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017–18 are shown below.

Strategic Outcome: International trade and travel is facilitated across Canada's border and Canada's population is protected from border-related risks.

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the CBSA's websiteFootnote ix and in the TBS InfoBase.Footnote xiv

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CBSA's website.Footnote ix.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote xv This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For more information on the CBSA and its activities, please visit the CBSA's websiteFootnote ix.

Contact Information for General Inquiries

By Telephone:

Within Canada: 1-800-461-9999

Outside Canada (long distance charges apply): 1-204-983-3500 or 1-506-636-5064

TTY within Canada (For those with hearing or speech impairments): 1-866-335-3237

By Email:

contact@cbsa.gc.ca

By Mail:

Canada Border Services Agency
Ottawa, ON
Canada
K1A 0L8

Appendix [A]: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plans (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date modified: